NYT > Health

    In Medical Reporting, the Impact of Patients’ Stories

    In Medical Reporting, the Impact of Patients’ Stories


    Dr. George Yancopoulos, co-founder, president and chief scientific officer for Regeneron, at the drug-maker's genome research center in Tarrytown, NY, in...

    A highly unusual response to my article on insurance obstacles to obtaining powerful new cholesterol-lowering drugs came from the very top: the leaders of one of the two companies making the drugs.
    Flashy Science Hub and Vaping Parties Fail to Win Friends at W.H.O. Tobacco Talks

    Flashy Science Hub and Vaping Parties Fail to Win Friends at W.H.O. Tobacco Talks


    A display promoting heat-not-burn devices at a “Science Hub” set up by the tobacco giant Philip Morris International, next to the World Health Organization’s tobacco treaty conference in...

    Industry representatives, who were barred from the negotiations, ultimately failed to get delegates to designate a special exemption for new products.
    Personal Health: Unlocking the World of Sound for Deaf Children

    Personal Health: Unlocking the World of Sound for Deaf Children


    ‘My mother practically cried when I heard a cricket chirping in the house,’ says a woman who got a cochlear implant at age...

    ‘My mother practically cried when I heard a cricket chirping in the house,’ says a woman who got a cochlear implant at age 11.
    The Importance of Medical Touch

    The Importance of Medical Touch


    It can show gentleness and compassion or carelessness and...

    It can show gentleness and compassion or carelessness and incompetence.
    Dr. Bernard J. Carroll, ‘Conscience of Psychiatry,’ Dies at 77

    Dr. Bernard J. Carroll, ‘Conscience of Psychiatry,’ Dies at 77


    Dr. Bernard J. Carroll at Duke University in the 1980s. A pioneer in biological psychiatry, he later became a scourge of corruption in scientific research. He called most drug trials...

    After early work on the biological basis of depression, Dr. Carroll became a relentless campaigner against corruption among academic researchers.
    HPV Vaccine Expanded for People Ages 27 to 45

    HPV Vaccine Expanded for People Ages 27 to 45


    About 14 million women and men become infected with the human papillomavirus each year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and...

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of Gardasil 9, a vaccine against nine strains of the human papillomavirus for older age groups.
    How a Seafloor Blob Became Mexico’s ‘Black Gold’

    How a Seafloor Blob Became Mexico’s ‘Black Gold’


    Local fishermen hang out and wait for a turn for their boats to be serviced in front of one of the fishing cooperatives in Rio Lagartos during a break from the...

    A frenzy for sea cucumbers, driven by demand in Asia, has brought their populations near collapse in the waters off the Yucatán Peninsula.
    Trilobites: Hidden Stories of Chinese Migration and Culture Found in Giant Genetic Study

    Trilobites: Hidden Stories of Chinese Migration and Culture Found in Giant Genetic Study


    People of the Miao ethnic minority in Guizhou province, southwestern China. A sweeping study of Chinese DNA had more than 140,000 participants, representing nearly every Chinese province and 37 out of 56 officially recognized ethnic...

    Scientists reported an assortment of findings resulting from a sweeping and novel analysis of data from the prenatal tests of 141,431 participants.
    One Year After #MeToo, Examining a Collective Awakening

    One Year After #MeToo, Examining a Collective Awakening


    Exactly one year ago, reporting on Harvey Weinstein unleashed a movement. That movement’s adaptability and capacity continues to be tested at a whirlwind...

    Exactly one year ago, reporting on Harvey Weinstein unleashed a movement. That movement’s adaptability and capacity continues to be tested at a whirlwind pace.
    Matter: Deep in Human DNA, a Gift From the Neanderthals

    Matter: Deep in Human DNA, a Gift From the Neanderthals


    A 45,000-year-old Neanderthal skeleton found in La Chapelle-aux-Saints, France. Many modern humans carry Neanderthal...

    Long ago, Neanderthals probably infected modern humans with viruses, perhaps even an ancient form of H.I.V. But our extinct relatives also gave us genetic defenses.
    Doctors: My Human Doctor

    Doctors: My Human Doctor


    Medical school teaches us to examine, to research, to treat. We don’t learn to err and...

    Medical school teaches us to examine, to research, to treat. We don’t learn to err and recover.
    Pret A Manger Starts Labeling Food With Allergens

    Pret A Manger Starts Labeling Food With Allergens


    Pret A Manger said in a statement that it would start adding full ingredient labels to its...

    The British sandwich chain was criticized for inadequate labeling after a 15-year-old girl died after eating one of its sandwiches.
    Psychedelic Mushrooms Are Closer to Medicinal Use (It’s Not Just Your Imagination)

    Psychedelic Mushrooms Are Closer to Medicinal Use (It’s Not Just Your Imagination)


    Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have suggested that psilocybin, which is found in hallucinogenic mushrooms, be reclassified from a Schedule I drug, with no known medical benefit, to a Schedule IV drug, which is akin to prescription sleeping...

    Researchers say psilocybin, the active compound in the mushrooms, should be reclassified to treat anxiety and depression. But any such move would be years away.
    Trilobites: Why Elephants Don’t Shed Their Skin

    Trilobites: Why Elephants Don’t Shed Their Skin


    African elephants don't sweat, but the cracks in their skin retain 10 times more moisture than a flat surface, helping them regulate body temperature and retain sun-blocking...

    The cracks in African elephants’ skin help them keep cool and stay healthy. A new explanation for how those cracks form could offer insights into treating a human skin disease.
    Eating Processed Meats Tied to Breast Cancer Risk

    Eating Processed Meats Tied to Breast Cancer Risk


    Women who ate the most processed meats, like hot dogs, bacon and ham, had a 9 percent increased risk of breast cancer compared to those who infrequently ate such...

    Women who ate the most processed meats, like hot dogs, bacon and ham, had a 9 percent increased risk of breast cancer compared to those who infrequently ate such foods.
    F.D.A. Seizes Documents From Juul Headquarters

    F.D.A. Seizes Documents From Juul Headquarters


    The F.D.A. inspection at Juul Labs’s headquarters in San Francisco was a follow-up for a request of documents in...

    The latest move by the agency to increase pressure on e-cigarette makers to curtail marketing their products to teenagers.
    Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Chief Executive Resigns From Merck’s Board of Directors

    Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Chief Executive Resigns From Merck’s Board of Directors


    Craig B. Thompson, chief executive of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, will no longer serve on the board of drug maker Merck. Just last year, he received $300,000 in compensation for that position, in addition to an executive package of about $6.7...

    Under scrutiny for the hospital’s industry ties and compensation, Dr. Craig B. Thompson stepped down from two company boards.
    Breakthrough Leukemia Treatment Backfires in a Rare Case

    Breakthrough Leukemia Treatment Backfires in a Rare Case


    A colored scanning electron microscope image of a leukemia cell, red, being attacked by a CAR-T cell. CAR-T gene therapy programs a person’s immune system to attack cancer cells. But in one case, the programming helped a cancer cell elude detection,...

    The groundbreaking treatment that genetically engineers a patient’s own cells to fight leukemia turned lethal in one patient, reversing his remission.