The Guardian

    Electoral Commission launches inquiry into leave campaign funding

    Electoral Commission launches inquiry into leave campaign funding


    Watchdog has ‘reasonable grounds to suspect offence was committed’ by Vote Leave and student campaigner who received £625,000 from groupThe Electoral Commission is to investigate Vote Leave for a potential breach of spending limits during the EU...

    Watchdog has ‘reasonable grounds to suspect offence was committed’ by Vote Leave and student campaigner who received £625,000 from group

    The Electoral Commission is to investigate Vote Leave for a potential breach of spending limits during the EU referendum campaign, and a student campaigner who received £625,000 from the organisation.

    The watchdog will investigate whether the officially designated Brexit campaign during the referendum, fronted by Boris Johnson and Michael Gove, breached the £7m legal spending limit and whether it had filed its returncorrectly.

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    Examples of Steve Smith and Joe Root point to less Ashes antagonism | Geoff Lemon

    Examples of Steve Smith and Joe Root point to less Ashes antagonism | Geoff Lemon


    Starting with their leaders, Australia and England look like teams that have realised they’re better suited to another wayThey look like a couple of nice boys. Wheatfield hair, slightly awkward smiles. Helpful at charity days, polite at press...

    Starting with their leaders, Australia and England look like teams that have realised they’re better suited to another way

    They look like a couple of nice boys. Wheatfield hair, slightly awkward smiles. Helpful at charity days, polite at press conferences, respectful about others in their field. Not quite with the cherubic aspect they had when beginning their current vocation, but hints of those chubby dimply faces remain.

    Steve Smith and Joe Root, Ashes captains, don’t fit the mould. It’s supposed to be all tough guys and hard bastards, sledging and chuntering, flint-eyed glares and “broken fucken arms”. Chappell, Border, Illingworth, Jardine, a legacy built on rough words and wads of brutalised chewing gum.

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    Michael Cheika facing World Rugby investigation for conduct during England v Australia

    Michael Cheika facing World Rugby investigation for conduct during England v Australia


    • Governing body looking into coach’s post-match comments at Twickenham • Cheika is expected to discover his fate on TuesdayMichael Cheika’s conduct during Australia’s 30-6 defeat by England at Twickenham has been referred for investigation by...

    • Governing body looking into coach’s post-match comments at Twickenham
    • Cheika is expected to discover his fate on Tuesday

    Michael Cheika’s conduct during Australia’s 30-6 defeat by England at Twickenham has been referred for investigation by World Rugby.

    The Wallabies head coach was infuriated by a number of refereeing decisions and when a Michael Hooper try was disallowed in the first half, he appeared to mouth “fucking genius” in reference to the decision made by the referee Ben O’Keeffe.

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    West Brom consider Alan Pardew and Nigel Pearson after sacking Tony Pulis

    West Brom consider Alan Pardew and Nigel Pearson after sacking Tony Pulis


    • Martin O’Neill also in the running after Albion dismiss Pulis • Assistant coach Gary Megson to take temporary chargeWest Bromwich Albion are prepared to take time to consider their options after Tony Pulis was relieved of his post on Monday after...

    • Martin O’Neill also in the running after Albion dismiss Pulis
    • Assistant coach Gary Megson to take temporary charge

    West Bromwich Albion are prepared to take time to consider their options after Tony Pulis was relieved of his post on Monday after a poor run of results that culminated in the 4-0 home thrashing by Chelsea on Saturday, with Nigel Pearson, Alan Pardew and Martin O’Neill among the potential candidates to succeed him.

    Gary Megson, who was manager between 2000 and 2004 and returned to the club in the summer as Pulis’s assistant, has been put in caretaker charge and is expected to take control for at least this weekend’s trip to face Tottenham Hotspur at Wembley. But with West Brom currently just a point clear of the relegation zone after 13 matches, the club’s hierarchy are aware of the importance of making a swift appointment, with the home fixture against Newcastle United next Tuesday quickly followed by the visit of bottom side Crystal Palace.

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    Kitchen consequential: how hazardous is your cooking space?

    Kitchen consequential: how hazardous is your cooking space?


    Cooks may be unwittingly inhaling dangerous microscopic oil droplets while using frying pans – but how does the health risk compare with other hazards in our kitchen?No one needs reminding of the benefits of good cooking, but how often have you paused...

    Cooks may be unwittingly inhaling dangerous microscopic oil droplets while using frying pans – but how does the health risk compare with other hazards in our kitchen?

    No one needs reminding of the benefits of good cooking, but how often have you paused among your appliances to consider the stark and various dangers lurking on and beneath our work surfaces?

    The latest kitchen nightmare to reckon with: cooking oil. Not the oil that clogs our arteries and gives us heart attacks in our 40s, or the oil that ignites in chip pans and burns the house down, but rather the stuff that explodes invisibly and enters our lungs.

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    Charles Manson’s prosaic and ugly life is over. But his loser cult lives on | Suzanne Moore

    Charles Manson’s prosaic and ugly life is over. But his loser cult lives on | Suzanne Moore


    A short man full of violence, rage and manipulation, his fantasy was of race war, and now his warped logic holds sway at the highest levels of US societyCharles Manson is finally dead. There is no resting in peace for such a person. At his trial, Manson...

    A short man full of violence, rage and manipulation, his fantasy was of race war, and now his warped logic holds sway at the highest levels of US society

    Charles Manson is finally dead. There is no resting in peace for such a person. At his trial, Manson told the prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi that he was already dead. He had said previously that he had been dead for 2,000 years. This was part of the confused allusions he made to being Christ. The terrible murders he committed in 1969 and his courtroom testimony transfixed America. The cult leader was finally starring in his own movie, strutting and fretting his hour upon the stage – a short, long-haired man full of violence, rage and manipulation.

    Related: Charles Manson, cult leader and convicted murderer, dies aged 83

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    Nebraska regulators approve Keystone XL pipeline route

    Nebraska regulators approve Keystone XL pipeline route


    Pipeline plan clears last major regulatory hurdle after vote in Nebraska, but legal challenges and protest likely to follow A panel of Nebraska regulators have voted narrowly in favor of allowing the Keystone XL pipeline to follow a path through the...

    Pipeline plan clears last major regulatory hurdle after vote in Nebraska, but legal challenges and protest likely to follow

    A panel of Nebraska regulators have voted narrowly in favor of allowing the Keystone XL pipeline to follow a path through the state, removing the last major regulatory hurdle for the controversial project.

    The Nebraska public service commission voted 3-2 to approve a permit for the pipeline, which will stretch for 1,200 miles and carry up to 830,000 barrels of oil a day. The vote saw one of the four Republicans on the commission, Mary Ridder, join with the Democrat, Crystal Rhoades, in opposing the permit. Rhoades said she was concerned about the impact upon landowners and that there was “no evidence” the pipeline would create jobs in Nebraska.

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    Tantrums over tiaras … how to navigate the latest gender minefield

    Tantrums over tiaras … how to navigate the latest gender minefield


    There’s a tabloid hysteria about what kids shouldn’t wear. Here’s a thought, says our style expert, in her weekly column: maybe we shouldn’t screw up our children any more than necessary with antiquated stereotypesThere seems to be a national...

    There’s a tabloid hysteria about what kids shouldn’t wear. Here’s a thought, says our style expert, in her weekly column: maybe we shouldn’t screw up our children any more than necessary with antiquated stereotypes

    There seems to be a national moral panic about what little children wear. Wait, what?

    Tamara, London

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    Artistic license? Experts doubt Leonardo da Vinci painted $450m Salvator Mundi

    Artistic license? Experts doubt Leonardo da Vinci painted $450m Salvator Mundi


    It broke the record for the most expensive painting ever sold, but the image of Jesus has come under fire with many doubting its authenticityAfter breaking the world record as the most expensive painting ever sold at an auction for $450.3m, Leonardo da...

    It broke the record for the most expensive painting ever sold, but the image of Jesus has come under fire with many doubting its authenticity

    After breaking the world record as the most expensive painting ever sold at an auction for $450.3m, Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi is at the heart of a hot debate among critics and historians who question whether this painting on wood of Jesus was ever touched by Leonardo’s brush.

    Some say it could have been made by Giovanni Boltraffio, an Italian artist who worked as a pupil in Leonardo’s studio.

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    The king of cling: Azzedine Alaïa's best looks – in pictures

    The king of cling: Azzedine Alaïa's best looks – in pictures


    The Tunisian-born fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa, who died on Friday, dressed everyone from Grace Jones and Naomi Campbell to all of French high society Continue...

    The Tunisian-born fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa, who died on Friday, dressed everyone from Grace Jones and Naomi Campbell to all of French high society

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    Uber plans to buy 24,000 autonomous Volvo SUVs in self-driving push

    Uber plans to buy 24,000 autonomous Volvo SUVs in self-driving push


    ‘It only becomes a commercial business when you can remove the vehicle operator from the equation,’ says ride-hailing firm battling Lyft and WaymoUber is planning to buy up to 24,000 self-driving cars from Volvo, the company has announced, moving...

    ‘It only becomes a commercial business when you can remove the vehicle operator from the equation,’ says ride-hailing firm battling Lyft and Waymo

    Uber is planning to buy up to 24,000 self-driving cars from Volvo, the company has announced, moving from its current model of ride-sharing using freelance drivers to owning a fleet of autonomous cars.

    Following the three-year self-driving partnership with Volvo, the non-binding framework could give Uber a boost in its ambitions to perfect self-driving systems to replace human drivers, following setbacks and lawsuits over trade secrets and talent.

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    How to repair our environment, one species at a time | Patrick Barkham

    How to repair our environment, one species at a time | Patrick Barkham


    Bringing back rare beetles and butterflies might sound self-indulgent, but it proves that individuals can make an impactThe swelteringly hot summer of 1976 was the last gasp for the chequered skipper, a dynamic little butterfly that once buzzed along the...

    Bringing back rare beetles and butterflies might sound self-indulgent, but it proves that individuals can make an impact

    The swelteringly hot summer of 1976 was the last gasp for the chequered skipper, a dynamic little butterfly that once buzzed along the rides of the ancient royal hunting forest of Rockingham.

    Related: Funding boost to help save England's rarest species from extinction

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    Blue Planet II: what have we learned so far?

    Blue Planet II: what have we learned so far?


    The documentary’s marvels are not just new to television – many are new to science as well. From hyper-intelligent fish to the origin of life itself, we round up the series’s biggest discoveries It is testament to the number of spectacles packed...

    The documentary’s marvels are not just new to television – many are new to science as well. From hyper-intelligent fish to the origin of life itself, we round up the series’s biggest discoveries

    It is testament to the number of spectacles packed into Blue Planet II that the strategic change of gender a giant wrasse is – scientifically speaking, at least – one of the least remarkable. Changing gender, or sequential hermaphroditism, is a fact of life for more than 400 species of fish, and has already been widely studied.

    But many of the programme’s marvels are new not just to television but to science itself. Some have only been published within the past half-decade; others existed only anecdotally until now. Here we track some of the most astonishing findings of the series so far – to be updated after each new episode.

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    Bananarama: how we made Robert De Niro's Waiting

    Bananarama: how we made Robert De Niro's Waiting


    ‘De Niro knocked on the window of the bar, wearing a bobble hat and glasses. We just thought: who is that?’Our plan was to do something like Grace Jones’s Pull Up to the Bumper. But somehow we ended up with a song based on a fantasy common to a lot...

    ‘De Niro knocked on the window of the bar, wearing a bobble hat and glasses. We just thought: who is that?’

    Our plan was to do something like Grace Jones’s Pull Up to the Bumper. But somehow we ended up with a song based on a fantasy common to a lot of young girls: falling in love with a star, having their poster on their wall – and escaping into a world that’s so much easier to deal with than a real relationship. The line about walking in the park and “people are staring and following me” reflected an uglier stalking side to the fantasy. The date-rape notion was Siobhan’s idea, possibly from something we’d read in a newspaper.

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    John Lewis plagiarism row gives Christmas sales boost to Mr Underbed

    John Lewis plagiarism row gives Christmas sales boost to Mr Underbed


    After Chris Riddell pointed out the similarity of the retailer’s seasonal TV ad to his picture book, demand for the latter has rocketedCopies of Chris Riddell’s picture book about a friendly blue monster who lives under a little boy’s bed, Mr...

    After Chris Riddell pointed out the similarity of the retailer’s seasonal TV ad to his picture book, demand for the latter has rocketed

    Copies of Chris Riddell’s picture book about a friendly blue monster who lives under a little boy’s bed, Mr Underbed, have sold out in the days since the former children’s laureate accused John Lewis of “help[ing] themselves” to the story for their Christmas TV ad.

    Riddell pointed out the similarities between his debut picture book, which was published in 1986, and John Lewis’s commercial, which features the monster Moz, last Thursday. “John Lewis help themselves to my picture book,” tweeted Riddell, adding: “The idea of a monster under the bed is by no means new but the ad does seem to bear a close resemblance to my creation – a big blue unthreatening monster who rocks the bed and snores loudly.”

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    One in seven councillors in English rental hotspots are landlords

    One in seven councillors in English rental hotspots are landlords


    Findings raise questions over whether dual role makes councils less inclined to regulate standards in private rental sectorHundreds of local councillors in England’s rental hotspots are landlords or own second properties, including more than a third of...

    Findings raise questions over whether dual role makes councils less inclined to regulate standards in private rental sector

    Hundreds of local councillors in England’s rental hotspots are landlords or own second properties, including more than a third of members in some town halls, analysis for the Guardian has revealed.

    More than 300 councillors in the 40 boroughs with the largest proportion of private homes for rent own multiple properties. One in seven elected representatives in the areas are landlords, according to declarations of interest.

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    The remarkable rise of Amiens, the club with President Macron's magic touch

    The remarkable rise of Amiens, the club with President Macron's magic touch


    Two years ago Amiens were playing to sparse crowds in France’s unglamorous third division. On Friday they held their own against Ligue 1 champions MonacoBy Adam White and Eric Devin for Get French Football NewsAt first glance, Amiens do not seem...

    Two years ago Amiens were playing to sparse crowds in France’s unglamorous third division. On Friday they held their own against Ligue 1 champions Monaco

    By Adam White and Eric Devin for Get French Football News

    At first glance, Amiens do not seem equipped to be a Ligue 1 club. They have never won a major trophy; this is their first season in the top flight in 116 years; and their pokey Stade de la Licorne would not look out of place in League Two. Nevertheless, their upward trajectory has been close to vertical in recent times. They finished third in the Championnat National, France’s third division, in 2015-16 and earned their second successive promotion 12 months later by finishing as runners up in Ligue 2. Their latest triumph came on Friday night, when they drew 1-1 with the champions Monaco.

    France’s third division is a true footballing backwater. Not even considered fully professional, nearly half of the league’s average gates have dropped into the hundreds this season. Unsurprisingly, stories of clubs ascending through the divisions – like Hull City in England or Paderborn in Germany – are rare. Amiens are the archetypal National club, provincial and comparatively sparsely supported.

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    Jana Novotna, former Wimbledon tennis champion, dies aged 49

    Jana Novotna, former Wimbledon tennis champion, dies aged 49


    • WTA confirms death of 1998 Wimbledon women’s singles champion• Novotna also won 16 grand slam doubles titles in her careerJana Novotna, who has died of cancer at 49, will forever be remembered for a moment of tears in defeat on Centre Court at...

    • WTA confirms death of 1998 Wimbledon women’s singles champion
    • Novotna also won 16 grand slam doubles titles in her career

    Jana Novotna, who has died of cancer at 49, will forever be remembered for a moment of tears in defeat on Centre Court at Wimbledon, as much as the 100 titles she won in a long and lauded tennis career.

    The Czech player, who was inducted into the sport’s hall of fame in 2005, struggled to contain her emotions after losing to Steffi Graf in the 1993 final at the All England Club, and the image of the Duchess of Kent consoling her during the trophy presentation is among the most enduring of the championships.

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    Most women in UK who have Islamic wedding miss out on legal rights

    Most women in UK who have Islamic wedding miss out on legal rights


    Poll for Channel 4 documentary finds 61% have not had separate civil ceremony to make marriage legal under British lawSix in 10 women in the UK who have had a traditional Muslim wedding ceremony are not in legally recognised marriages, depriving them of...

    Poll for Channel 4 documentary finds 61% have not had separate civil ceremony to make marriage legal under British law

    Six in 10 women in the UK who have had a traditional Muslim wedding ceremony are not in legally recognised marriages, depriving them of rights and protection, according to a survey.

    It found that nearly all married Muslim women have had a nikah, a religious marriage ceremony, but 61% had not gone through a separate civil ceremony which would make the marriage legal under UK law.

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    Call to stub out on-screen smoking in French films

    Call to stub out on-screen smoking in French films


    Injecting morality into films is ‘like pouring cola into a Château Lafite’, one critic of idea declaresThe French actor Jean-Paul Belmondo spent almost an entire film – the 1960s classic À Bout du Souffle (Breathless) – with a Gauloise dangling...

    Injecting morality into films is ‘like pouring cola into a Château Lafite’, one critic of idea declares

    The French actor Jean-Paul Belmondo spent almost an entire film – the 1960s classic À Bout du Souffle (Breathless) – with a Gauloise dangling from his lips. Audrey Tautou portrayed the designer Coco Chanel pinning haute couture dresses while smoking. Jacques Tati was rarely without his pipe and Brigitte Bardot, Jeanne Moreau, Catherine Deneuve, Gérard Depardieu and Alain Delon all puffed their way through decades of movies.

    Hardly surprising then that a call for French directors to stub out smoking on screen has been greeted with a mix of disbelief and outright ridicule. It has also prompted the existential question: what would French cinema be without the cigarette?

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    France warned of Christmas foie gras shortage

    France warned of Christmas foie gras shortage


    Stocks of controversial and seasonal goose and duck liver delicacy seriously hit for second year in a row by avian fluChristmas would not be Noël in France without a fat goose liver on the festive table.But farmers say stocks of foie gras – enjoyed...

    Stocks of controversial and seasonal goose and duck liver delicacy seriously hit for second year in a row by avian flu

    Christmas would not be Noël in France without a fat goose liver on the festive table.

    But farmers say stocks of foie gras – enjoyed over the festive period by an estimated 80% of France’s population – have been seriously hit by avian flu for the second year in a row.

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    No one will forget the day it came right for Jana Novotna at Wimbledon

    No one will forget the day it came right for Jana Novotna at Wimbledon


    Jana Novotna, who has died at the age of 49, ended her wait for SW19 glory in 1998. Writing in the Guardian that year, Stephen Bierley recalled a famous dayOne of the most compelling images in tennis during the closing decade of this century was one born...

    Jana Novotna, who has died at the age of 49, ended her wait for SW19 glory in 1998. Writing in the Guardian that year, Stephen Bierley recalled a famous day

    One of the most compelling images in tennis during the closing decade of this century was one born of loss. In the 1993 Wimbledon women’s singles final, and leading 4-1 in the third set, Jana Novotna dramatically crumpled to defeat against Steffi Graf and then, unable to contain her emotions, wept lingeringly on the shoulder of the Duchess of Kent.

    Four years later Novotna was on Wimbledon’s Centre Court again, losing in three sets to the 16-year-old Swiss Martina Hingis. No tears this time, but playful resignation masking her disappointment as she snatched the silver rosewater dish away from Hingis and made as if to run off with it.

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    Cambridge student died in fall after taking legal high, inquest told

    Cambridge student died in fall after taking legal high, inquest told


    Thomas Millward, 19, died in hospital after sustaining ‘traumatic’ brain injury in stairwell of Girton College, court hearsA first-year Cambridge student was found naked and unconscious after taking a legal high and falling down a stairwell, an...

    Thomas Millward, 19, died in hospital after sustaining ‘traumatic’ brain injury in stairwell of Girton College, court hears

    A first-year Cambridge student was found naked and unconscious after taking a legal high and falling down a stairwell, an inquest has heard.

    Thomas Millward was found injured at the bottom of stairs after police were called to 148-year-old Girton College on 5 March last year.

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    This budget will make things even worse for women and the disadvantaged | Dawn Butler

    This budget will make things even worse for women and the disadvantaged | Dawn Butler


    So much for Theresa May acting on Britain’s ‘burning injustices’. The Tories must U-turn on austerity• Dawn Butler is shadow minister for women and equalities and Labour MP for Brent CentralAusterity, the Tories’ failed economic project, has...

    So much for Theresa May acting on Britain’s ‘burning injustices’. The Tories must U-turn on austerity

    • Dawn Butler is shadow minister for women and equalities and Labour MP for Brent Central

    Austerity, the Tories’ failed economic project, has hit women and ethnic minority communities the hardest. Today, we say: no more. This week’s budget must not be another veiled attack on marginalised and disadvantaged groups.

    The government is well aware of structural and systemic gender and racial inequalities across our society, from discrimination in the workplace, unemployment and underemployment, the gender and racial pay gaps, to the over-representation of black people in the criminal justice system and under-representation of women and people of colour in public life.

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    Republican tax cuts will hurt Americans. And Democrats will pay the price | Bruce Bartlett

    Republican tax cuts will hurt Americans. And Democrats will pay the price | Bruce Bartlett


    The consequences of the tax program will shelve support for the Republicans, but once in power the Democrats’ hands will be financially bound for yearsI think many Democrats and independent political observers are puzzled by the intensity with which...

    The consequences of the tax program will shelve support for the Republicans, but once in power the Democrats’ hands will be financially bound for years

    I think many Democrats and independent political observers are puzzled by the intensity with which Republicans are pursuing their tax cut. It’s not politically popular and may well lead to the party’s defeat in next year’s congressional elections. So why do it?

    The answer is that Republicans are pushing the tax cut at breakneck speed precisely because they know they are probably going to lose next year and in 2020 as well. The tax cut, once enacted, however, will bind the hands of Democrats for years to come, forcing them to essentially follow a Republican agenda of deficit reduction and prevent any action on a positive Democratic program. The result will be a steady erosion of support for Democrats that will put Republicans back in power within a few election cycles.

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    Robert Mugabe swapped speeches, say Zimbabwe war veterans

    Robert Mugabe swapped speeches, say Zimbabwe war veterans


    Powerful group claims that president pulled off manoeuvre to avoid standing down, amid reports he has drafted resignation letterZimbabwe’s powerful war veterans have claimed that Robert Mugabe swapped speeches to avoid resigning during a televised...

    Powerful group claims that president pulled off manoeuvre to avoid standing down, amid reports he has drafted resignation letter

    Zimbabwe’s powerful war veterans have claimed that Robert Mugabe swapped speeches to avoid resigning during a televised address to the nation on Sunday night, as they repeated their call for him to go.

    The 93-year-old, sacked as leader of the ruling Zanu-PF party, had been given a noon deadline (1000 GMT) on Monday to resign as head of state or face impeachment when parliament reconvenes on Tuesday.

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    Doctor Who theme's co-creator honoured with posthumous PhD

    Doctor Who theme's co-creator honoured with posthumous PhD


    Career of Delia Derbyshire, an under-appreciated electronic music pioneer, recognised by hometown universityThe under-appreciated electronic music pioneer behind the Doctor Who theme is to be honoured posthumously with a doctorate from her hometown...

    Career of Delia Derbyshire, an under-appreciated electronic music pioneer, recognised by hometown university

    The under-appreciated electronic music pioneer behind the Doctor Who theme is to be honoured posthumously with a doctorate from her hometown university as the programme gears up for the debut of its first female lead.

    Largely ignored in life and barred from working in studios because she was a woman, Delia Derbyshire, will be awarded an honorary PhD from Coventry University on Monday.

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    German president calls on party leaders to return to coalition talks

    German president calls on party leaders to return to coalition talks


    Frank-Walter Steinmeier met Angela Merkel as country faces worst political crisis in decadesThe German president, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, has called on German political leaders to reconsider their positions the day after the collapse of coalition talks...

    Frank-Walter Steinmeier met Angela Merkel as country faces worst political crisis in decades

    The German president, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, has called on German political leaders to reconsider their positions the day after the collapse of coalition talks pushed the country into its worst political crisis in decades.

    Coming out of talks with the chancellor, Angela Merkel, Steinmeier said he would meet all the party leaders this week. He urged a rethink that could allow them to form a government and sought to avoid a minority government under Merkel or fresh elections.

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    Insigne runs Napoli show on uplifting Serie A weekend laced with regret | Paolo Bandini

    Insigne runs Napoli show on uplifting Serie A weekend laced with regret | Paolo Bandini


    The striker granted just 15 minutes of Italy’s play-off defeat against Sweden continued the scintillating club form that made his omission so controversialIt was a weekend for gallows humour in Italy. “Goals from [Ciro] Immobile and [Lorenzo] Insigne...

    The striker granted just 15 minutes of Italy’s play-off defeat against Sweden continued the scintillating club form that made his omission so controversial

    It was a weekend for gallows humour in Italy. “Goals from [Ciro] Immobile and [Lorenzo] Insigne yesterday,” tweeted the wags from Chiamarsi Bomber on Sunday. “So we qualified, right?”

    In truth, it will take a lot more than a week for a nation to digest its World Cup play-off defeat to Sweden. Gian Piero Ventura was fired as manager of the Azzurri last week, and the Football Federation president Carlo Tavecchio resigned on Monday amid reports that his support base had crumbled.

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    Werder Bremen and showman Max Kruse keep reality from the door | Andy Brassell

    Werder Bremen and showman Max Kruse keep reality from the door | Andy Brassell


    Max Kruse’s hat-trick brought relief at the Weserstadion, but questions over the club’s long-term – and even medium-term – plan remain“It doesn’t matter who scores the goals,” said Max Kruse on Thursday, and it sounded like he believed it....

    Max Kruse’s hat-trick brought relief at the Weserstadion, but questions over the club’s long-term – and even medium-term – plan remain

    “It doesn’t matter who scores the goals,” said Max Kruse on Thursday, and it sounded like he believed it. Yet even if it doesn’t quite mean everything, it means a lot. That much was evident after he retired to the bench a few minutes from the end from Werder Bremen’s emphatic 4-0 win over Hannover on Sunday, their first of the season, having hit a hat-trick – his first goals of the season. Kruse goofed around, whooping and pulling faces at the television cameras. The supporters’ relief was palpable. Not just at the result, but at their star forward taking centre stage again.

    Kruse reiterated that idea of the collective afterwards, saying he was “even happier about the team’s performance” than he was about his contribution, and the others certainly put in a shift. Nobody in the Bundesliga, for example, ran more than midfielder Maximilian Eggestein’s 13.4km this weekend, with Kicker labelling him the “Kilometer-König”.

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    Barnier says EU will not compromise standards in future UK trade deal

    Barnier says EU will not compromise standards in future UK trade deal


    Chief Brexit negotiator says any move to abandon European laws and regulations will complicate agreementThe EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, has said that any move by a British government to abandon European-style policies will complicate...

    Chief Brexit negotiator says any move to abandon European laws and regulations will complicate agreement

    The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, has said that any move by a British government to abandon European-style policies will complicate the agreement of a post-Brexit trade deal in national and regional parliaments across the bloc.

    The EU was ready to offer the UK the “most ambitious” partnership on trade possible, he said, but was not going to compromise its standards on fair competition, tax, labour law, environmental and food safety.

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    Nolito: ‘Comments hurt you and your family. Being insulted isn’t part of the job’

    Nolito: ‘Comments hurt you and your family. Being insulted isn’t part of the job’


    Nolito, who faces Liverpool with Sevilla on Tuesday, opens up on Pep Guardiola, explains how a joke about the English weather led to all sorts of trouble and reveals who he thinks is the best player at Manchester CityNolito says he was “joking”,...

    Nolito, who faces Liverpool with Sevilla on Tuesday, opens up on Pep Guardiola, explains how a joke about the English weather led to all sorts of trouble and reveals who he thinks is the best player at Manchester City

    Nolito says he was “joking”, which he often is, as another cheeky grin sweeps across his face and he starts laughing again. “Bloody hell,” he says, which is something he says a lot – or its slightly ruder Spanish equivalent anyway. And then he continues: “But it was for real, eh! I had to give her vitamin D, the poor thing. We’d go outside but the sun just never came out. Even I ended up pale …” A quick glance up and he adds, giggling: “Just like you!” And just like his daughter Lola, aged nine, and one-year-old twins, Lara and Alegría.

    Towards the end of his first season in England, by which time he knew it would be his last, the former Manchester City player, now back in Spain with Liverpool’s Champions League opponents Sevilla, said his daughter had changed colour. “She looks like she’s been living in a cave,” he said then; “it got misinterpreted,” he says now. “It was just a joke, a throwaway line. And it was true: there was no sun and the paediatrician said: ‘Try this’…

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    What does Germany’s political crisis mean for Brexit? | Martin Kettle

    What does Germany’s political crisis mean for Brexit? | Martin Kettle


    With coalition talks collapsing, Angela Merkel has problems at home to sort. The idea she could magic a Brexit solution favourable to the UK is simply for the birdsThe British political class, like much of the British media, remains foolishly obsessed...

    With coalition talks collapsing, Angela Merkel has problems at home to sort. The idea she could magic a Brexit solution favourable to the UK is simply for the birds

    The British political class, like much of the British media, remains foolishly obsessed with America to the exclusion of all other foreign countries. As a result, both refuse to pay consistent attention to German politics, or indeed to the internal politics of any other European country at all. So the news that Angela Merkel may not, after all, continue in office as Germany’s chancellor will have come as a rude shock to many of them.

    The British have always blithely assumed that Merkel would somehow ride to the UK’s rescue over Brexit like the Prussians at the battle of Waterloo. David Cameron thought this would happen in the negotiations preceding the referendum in 2015-16. Now Theresa May, and certainly David Davis, seem to have a similar hope over Brexit. It is a foolish error.

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    Urban biking and a Balinese festival: Monday's best photos

    Urban biking and a Balinese festival: Monday's best photos


    The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including a marathon on the sea and jewel tones in Kyoto Continue...

    The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including a marathon on the sea and jewel tones in Kyoto

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    Jacinda Ardern or Trudeau's wife? New Zealand PM regrets 'yarn' about Trump

    Jacinda Ardern or Trudeau's wife? New Zealand PM regrets 'yarn' about Trump


    As reports circulate that Donald Trump may have been confused about Ardern’s identity, she says she won’t share backstage stories againNew Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, has expressed regret over gossiping about a meeting with Donald...

    As reports circulate that Donald Trump may have been confused about Ardern’s identity, she says she won’t share backstage stories again

    New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, has expressed regret over gossiping about a meeting with Donald Trump after it was reported the US president may have mistaken her for Justin Trudeau’s wife.

    Ardern was visibly uncomfortable when asked about reports that she had revealed details of the encounter at the East Asia summit in Vietnam last week to a friend who later went public.

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    White House says true cost of opioid drug epidemic in 2015 was $504bn

    White House says true cost of opioid drug epidemic in 2015 was $504bn


    New study puts cost at more than six times previous estimateReport factors in illicit opiods like heroin as well as prescription drugsThe White House says the true cost of the opioid drug epidemic in 2015 was $504bn, or roughly half a trillion dollars.In...

    New study puts cost at more than six times previous estimateReport factors in illicit opiods like heroin as well as prescription drugs

    The White House says the true cost of the opioid drug epidemic in 2015 was $504bn, or roughly half a trillion dollars.

    In an analysis to be released on Monday, the Council of Economic Advisers says the figure is more than six times larger than the most recent estimate. The council said a 2016 private study estimated that prescription opioid overdoes, abuse and dependence in the US in 2013 cost $78.5bn. Most of that was attributed to healthcare and criminal justice spending, along with lost productivity.

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    Kenya court upholds President Kenyatta's election victory

    Kenya court upholds President Kenyatta's election victory


    Supreme court dismisses challenge to re-run poll, but opposition, which boycotted the vote, says government is illegitimateKenya’s supreme court has upheld the victory of President Uhuru Kenyatta in last month’s controversial re-run of presidential...

    Supreme court dismisses challenge to re-run poll, but opposition, which boycotted the vote, says government is illegitimate

    Kenya’s supreme court has upheld the victory of President Uhuru Kenyatta in last month’s controversial re-run of presidential elections, clearing the way for the 55-year-old leader to be sworn in for a second and final term next week.

    After hearing two days of arguments, a six-judge bench said two petitions demanding the cancellation of the polls were “without merit”.

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    Sri Lankan civil war novel takes DSC prize for south Asian literature

    Sri Lankan civil war novel takes DSC prize for south Asian literature


    Anuk Arudpragasam’s The Story of a Brief Marriage takes the $25,000 award with a novel ‘exploring the tragic heart of war with quiet eloquence’A novel that condenses the horrors of the 26-year Sri Lankan civil war into an intimate love story has...

    Anuk Arudpragasam’s The Story of a Brief Marriage takes the $25,000 award with a novel ‘exploring the tragic heart of war with quiet eloquence’

    A novel that condenses the horrors of the 26-year Sri Lankan civil war into an intimate love story has won the 2017 DSC prize for south Asian literature, the region’s richest book prize. Anuk Arudpragasam’s The Story of a Brief Marriage beat four shortlisted rivals to win the $25,000 (£19,000) award presented at the Dhaka literary festival in Bangladesh.

    Announcing the winner, Ritu Menon, chair of judges, praised the novel for its “intensity and rich detail … exploring the tragic heart of war with such quiet eloquence”. She added: “It is also a testament to the redemptive power of love, and to the human spirit’s capacity for hope.”

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    Turkish LGBTI activists condemn 'illegal' ban on events in Ankara

    Turkish LGBTI activists condemn 'illegal' ban on events in Ankara


    Authorities’ move follows ban on a festival of German-language gay films in Turkish capitalRights groups have condemned as illegal and discriminatory a ban on LGBTI events in the Turkish capital one week after President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan described...

    Authorities’ move follows ban on a festival of German-language gay films in Turkish capital

    Rights groups have condemned as illegal and discriminatory a ban on LGBTI events in the Turkish capital one week after President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan described empowering gay people as being “against the values of our nation”.

    The Ankara governor’s office said on Sunday night it was imposing a ban on all LGBTI cultural events until further notice, citing threats to “public order” and the fear of “provoking reactions within certain segments of society,” days after it banned a festival on German-language gay films in the capital city.

    The ban is the latest in a series of attempts by the ruling Justice and Development (AK) party to curtail the activities of Turkey’s LGBTI rights movement, and to impose what critics say is a public morality rooted in Islam.

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    When good TV goes bad: how Quantum Leap made one leap too far

    When good TV goes bad: how Quantum Leap made one leap too far


    The time-travel show used its man-in-another-man’s-body tool to show that compassion trumps prejudice. Then Dr Sam turned up as Lee Harvey OswaldKeep your salacious, scowling, morally compromised antiheroes. Doctor Sam Beckett – Quantum Leap’s...

    The time-travel show used its man-in-another-man’s-body tool to show that compassion trumps prejudice. Then Dr Sam turned up as Lee Harvey Oswald

    Keep your salacious, scowling, morally compromised antiheroes. Doctor Sam Beckett – Quantum Leap’s time-hopping samaritan – was dependably the opposite, a sort of uncle hero. As played by the square-jawed Scott Bakula, Sam may have looked rugged but he was also relatable, a goofy but indefatigable do-gooder with six different doctorates, some sick kickboxing moves and a core decency so unshakeable it could apparently survive the existential trauma of frequent temporal displacement.

    For five memorable seasons between 1989 and 1993, Sam didn’t just parrot the old maxim about walking a mile in another man’s shoes (or combat boots or high heels); he lived it. After a haywire physics experiment in 1999 sends him ping-ponging within the span of his own lifetime, Sam finds himself zapped abruptly into strangers like a one-sided Freaky Friday. With the help of horndog hologram Al (Dean Stockwell), Sam must intuit how to alter each current sliver of history for the better, clearing the cosmic runway for his next mercy mission.

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    Marshawn Lynch a target of Donald Trump broadside after sitting for anthem

    Marshawn Lynch a target of Donald Trump broadside after sitting for anthem


    Oakland Raiders running back sits out anthem in Mexico CityPresident says NFL should suspend league veteran for his actionsDonald Trump has resumed his attack on the NFL protest movement, saying the Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch should be...

    Oakland Raiders running back sits out anthem in Mexico CityPresident says NFL should suspend league veteran for his actions

    Donald Trump has resumed his attack on the NFL protest movement, saying the Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch should be suspended after he sat for the national anthem.

    The Raiders played the New England Patriots in Mexico City on Sunday and stood for the Mexican national anthem. He remained standing for the opening of the Star-Spangled Banner before sitting down.

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    Robert Mugabe: life of a dictator – video profile

    Robert Mugabe: life of a dictator – video profile


    The Zimbabwean president, Robert Mugabe, is under house arrest in Harare following a military takeover. The 93-year-old has led Zimbabwe's since independence from Britain. In recent years disastrous policies have led to hyperinflation, international...

    The Zimbabwean president, Robert Mugabe, is under house arrest in Harare following a military takeover. The 93-year-old has led Zimbabwe's since independence from Britain. In recent years disastrous policies have led to hyperinflation, international sanctions and economic ruin

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    Beer goggles? Gordon Ramsay under fire over Korean TV advert

    Beer goggles? Gordon Ramsay under fire over Korean TV advert


    ‘Bloody fresh,’ said the chef as he downed a glass of Cass, but critics say he is endorsing ‘maybe the worst beer in the world’Gordon Ramsay routinely berates contestants – often in the most colourful terms – on his television shows for their...

    ‘Bloody fresh,’ said the chef as he downed a glass of Cass, but critics say he is endorsing ‘maybe the worst beer in the world’

    Gordon Ramsay routinely berates contestants – often in the most colourful terms – on his television shows for their poor sense of taste.

    But this week it is the celebrity chef’s own tastebuds that are being called into question after he appeared in a TV advert promoting a South Korean beer that can politely be described as bland.

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    Eddie Jones’ marginal gains show value of keeping man in the middle on side | Andy Bull

    Eddie Jones’ marginal gains show value of keeping man in the middle on side | Andy Bull


    England coach’s pre-match charm offensive towards referee Ben O’Keeffe looks a canny move after five tight decisions against Australia favour his sideAn hour after the match, Eddie Jones snapped. Four questions into his press conference, Jones was...

    England coach’s pre-match charm offensive towards referee Ben O’Keeffe looks a canny move after five tight decisions against Australia favour his side

    An hour after the match, Eddie Jones snapped. Four questions into his press conference, Jones was asked how he felt about the marginal calls made by the referee, Ben O’Keeffe, and whether he felt England had been lucky to get the better of them. It was a fair question, but it set off Jones’s hair-trigger temper. “Why do we have a referee? Why do we have TMOs? I don’t understand the question,” Jones said. “How were we lucky? Ten replays of the video and they make a decision. This is the best referee in the world for today, they have the best guys doing the TMO, and you’re saying we’re lucky because the decisions went our way. Sorry, sorry, sorry. I’m sorry we’re lucky.”

    Jones’s acidic answer curdled the mood of the room. He is, they say, a hard man to work with, as prickly as a cactus, and he has a habit of picking on journalists in public. Since England are winning, he could rightly argue that it doesn’t matter a damn, and so long as they carry on that way it won’t cost him anything but amity. If he ever finds himself in need of a little goodwill, however, he may regret the way he is squandering some of it now. As the saying goes, you catch more flies with honey than vinegar. Which Jones knows – just look at the way he buttered up O’Keeffe before and after Saturday’s match.

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    Gaia Pope death: police release three people after postmortem

    Gaia Pope death: police release three people after postmortem


    Detectives no longer investigating three members of same family, and believe no one else was involved in teenager’s deathThree members of the same family arrested on suspicion of the murder of 19-year-old Gaia Pope have been released from investigation...

    Detectives no longer investigating three members of same family, and believe no one else was involved in teenager’s death

    Three members of the same family arrested on suspicion of the murder of 19-year-old Gaia Pope have been released from investigation after detectives said they did not believe they, or anyone else, was involved her death.

    Rosemary Dinch, 71, her son Paul Elsey, 49, and grandson Nathan Elsey, 19, were arrested following Pope’s disappearance in Swanage in Dorset this month.

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    Anna Jones’s recipes for baked onions and crispy shallots

    Anna Jones’s recipes for baked onions and crispy shallots


    Cheap, readily available and infinitely adaptable, onions are the starting point for a multitude of dishes. But buttered and baked or fried to a crisp, the humble onion is more than able to steal the showOnions are arguably the stars of the kitchen. They...

    Cheap, readily available and infinitely adaptable, onions are the starting point for a multitude of dishes. But buttered and baked or fried to a crisp, the humble onion is more than able to steal the show

    Onions are arguably the stars of the kitchen. They are cheap, readily available and crucial for laying the foundations of so many dishes, across countless cooking cultures.

    Few good dishes I cook start without an onion, and I love how they can be taken to both ends of the flavour spectrum, from bracingly pickled to sweetly slow-cooked, almost caramel in texture.

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    How colonial violence came home: the ugly truth of the first world war – podcast

    How colonial violence came home: the ugly truth of the first world war – podcast


    The Great War is often depicted as an unexpected catastrophe. But for millions who had been living under imperialist rule, terror and degradation were nothing new• Read the text version hereSubscribe via Audioboom, iTunes, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Acast &...

    The Great War is often depicted as an unexpected catastrophe. But for millions who had been living under imperialist rule, terror and degradation were nothing new

    Read the text version here

    Subscribe via Audioboom, iTunes, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Acast & Sticher and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

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    Female sex tech pioneers are turning pleasure into empowerment

    Female sex tech pioneers are turning pleasure into empowerment


    Women are founding startups to design sex toys and wearables that appeal to female sensuality and increase representation in the tech industryThe percentage of female leaders working in technology is notoriously low and the sex tech industry fares no...

    Women are founding startups to design sex toys and wearables that appeal to female sensuality and increase representation in the tech industry

    The percentage of female leaders working in technology is notoriously low and the sex tech industry fares no better. But there has been a surge in the number of sex tech businesses founded by women in recent years – so much so that 2017 has been hailed the year of the ‘vagina-nomics’ by the intelligence agency JWT. But how is the rise of female sex tech disrupting the industry and empowering women?

    For years sex toys have largely been designed around the idea that they can only be effective for women if they’re penis-shaped.

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    A budget to increase national debt? That would be a pay rise for Britain | Phil McDuff

    A budget to increase national debt? That would be a pay rise for Britain | Phil McDuff


    Getting rid of deficits is disastrous for economies – as Bill Clinton proved in the 1990s. But don’t expect Philip Hammond to ditch this crazy obsessionPhilip Hammond is in a bind as he prepares for the autumn budget. On the one hand, with Theresa...

    Getting rid of deficits is disastrous for economies – as Bill Clinton proved in the 1990s. But don’t expect Philip Hammond to ditch this crazy obsession

    Philip Hammond is in a bind as he prepares for the autumn budget. On the one hand, with Theresa May reeling from ministerial resignations and facing rebellion from the right of her party over Brexit, the chancellor is under pressure from his own MPs to ginger the budget horse. On the other hand he is being stalked by John McDonnell’s popular (and sensible) policies. And the only defence Hammond can mount is the increasingly threadbare invocation of the “fiscal rules”, of keeping the deficit low and maintaining “credibility”.

    Related: Housing, tax, pensions: what are your hopes for the the autumn budget?

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    British Gas owner scraps controversial standard variable tariff

    British Gas owner scraps controversial standard variable tariff


    Centrica becomes third of big six suppliers to end SVT for new customers, with rivals expected to follow suit British Gas owner Centrica is to scrap its widely criticised standard variable tariff (SVT) for new customers from April, and other energy...

    Centrica becomes third of big six suppliers to end SVT for new customers, with rivals expected to follow suit

    British Gas owner Centrica is to scrap its widely criticised standard variable tariff (SVT) for new customers from April, and other energy companies are expected to follow suit.

    The company is the third of the big six suppliers to announce the end of its SVT following announcements from E.on and Scottish Power.

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    Kezia Dugdale joins I'm a Celebrity and causes split in Scottish Labour

    Kezia Dugdale joins I'm a Celebrity and causes split in Scottish Labour


    Former leader’s decision to join jungle reality show overshadows election of her successor, Richard LeonardRichard Leonard, the new leader of Scottish Labour, has said “feelings are running high” in the party after his predecessor, Kezia Dugdale,...

    Former leader’s decision to join jungle reality show overshadows election of her successor, Richard Leonard

    Richard Leonard, the new leader of Scottish Labour, has said “feelings are running high” in the party after his predecessor, Kezia Dugdale, joined the reality TV show I’m a Celebrity … Get Me Out of Here.

    Dugdale, who quit as Scottish leader in August, has caused a furious row after news leaked out on Friday night she was flying to join the contest in Australia without first getting party approval to be away from Holyrood for up to three weeks.

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    Taunts and the tide of history await as England prepare to enter the Gabbatoir

    Taunts and the tide of history await as England prepare to enter the Gabbatoir


    Three decades have passed since England’s last win in Brisbane, and its unique hostility will provide an Ashes baptism of fire for Joe Root’s teamAs England’s plane touched down in Brisbane on Sunday the Australia coach, Darren Lehmann, said: “We...

    Three decades have passed since England’s last win in Brisbane, and its unique hostility will provide an Ashes baptism of fire for Joe Root’s team

    As England’s plane touched down in Brisbane on Sunday the Australia coach, Darren Lehmann, said: “We love playing here.” It is easy to see why, because Australians love winning and at the Gabba they almost always win. England last left victorious in 1986, and Australia lost against West Indies in 1988 but have not been defeated at the Gabba since. Just seven of those 29 Tests have been drawn, two of them by England.

    Related: Darren Lehmann calls for unity while Jonny Bairstow backs ‘motivated’ England

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    Family of detained Briton Laura Plummer apologise to Egypt

    Family of detained Briton Laura Plummer apologise to Egypt


    Relatives express gratitude for ‘fairness’ justice system has shown towards woman accused of trafficking painkillersThe family of the detained British citizen Laura Plummer have issued an apology to the Egyptian government. Speaking to the Guardian,...

    Relatives express gratitude for ‘fairness’ justice system has shown towards woman accused of trafficking painkillers

    The family of the detained British citizen Laura Plummer have issued an apology to the Egyptian government.

    Speaking to the Guardian, Plummer’s sister Rachel presented a statement on behalf of her family. “I would like to place on record our gratitude for the fairness and just manner the Egyptian justice system has shown Laura,” it says.

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    These sexual assault scandals are horrific. But they’ve made me feel safer | Sarah Gosling

    These sexual assault scandals are horrific. But they’ve made me feel safer | Sarah Gosling


    Like most women, I always knew there were monsters lurking in the shadows. These days men are more likely to believe it – and watch out for them – tooSpacey. Westwick. Hoffman. Seagal. Blaine. CK. Weinstein (Harvey and Bob). Affleck (Casey and Ben)....

    Like most women, I always knew there were monsters lurking in the shadows. These days men are more likely to believe it – and watch out for them – too

    Spacey. Westwick. Hoffman. Seagal. Blaine. CK. Weinstein (Harvey and Bob). Affleck (Casey and Ben). The list goes on. In the past few months, seemingly half of Hollywood and half of government have stood accused. Since the New York Times and the New Yorker exposed Harvey Weinstein’s behaviour, the floodgates have opened as more and more women have felt that finally here was the chance they needed: to make accusations about the wolf without being told they were just crying.

    In all the conversations that I’ve had with men about what I’m terming “man-fear”, I’ve heard the same comment time and again: “It can’t be that bad”. Women can’t be scared all the time, can’t be constantly looking over their shoulders, looking out for the next could-be predator about to graze their behind and “accidentally” squeeze while reaching for his drink. Because not all men are like that you see. Well, thanks to this ongoing pile-up of scandals, all’s gone a bit quiet on the “it’s not all men” front.

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    Barcelona the only winners in Madrid after derby stalemate | Sid Lowe

    Barcelona the only winners in Madrid after derby stalemate | Sid Lowe


    It is still early in the season but even a draw in the derby was not much use; Madrid and Atlético had to win. Only Barcelona didFC Barcelona pulled out of Butarque on an angular blue and orange bus that looked like it had been borrowed from a school...

    It is still early in the season but even a draw in the derby was not much use; Madrid and Atlético had to win. Only Barcelona did

    FC Barcelona pulled out of Butarque on an angular blue and orange bus that looked like it had been borrowed from a school trip in the 90s a bit before seven on Saturday evening and headed 30 kilometres north up the M40 to the airport at Barajas, their work done. Half of it, anyway. Nearby, just about visible from the terminal, stood the Wanda Metropolitano, where the rest of it was done for them. Not long after Barça had set off, and a couple of hours after Alavés had passed on their way north back up the A1 to Euskadi, Real Madrid embarked upon the shortest journey they’ve undertaken in La Liga, making the 10-minute trip from their HQ at Valdebebas to Atlético’s new home. It was a short trip, but when they returned a little before midnight, broken and bloodied, it felt like a long way back. For Barcelona, it had been a grand day out.

    From the Coliseum across to Eleven Lions Avenue – yes, really – and up to Avenida Arcentales, there were three games in Madrid on Saturday and the third of them was the game: Getafe-Alavés at 1pm, Leganés-Barcelona at 4.15pm and then Atlético-Real at 8.45pm. As flight AEA938 climbed into the sky, the first Madrid derby at the Wanda hadn’t yet started and when it landed, just after nine, it hadn’t yet finished. There hadn’t been a goal yet, either – Ángel Correa had missed the game’s best chance after three minutes, Diego Simeone looking like he was fighting back tears on the touchline, and Toni Kroos nudged one wide at the other end, but that was about it – and Barcelona’s players just about had time to get home for the second half. Those that wanted to, that is – and you might be surprised how few footballers bother.

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    Russell Simmons accused of sexual assault alongside Brett Ratner

    Russell Simmons accused of sexual assault alongside Brett Ratner


    Def Jam co-founder and Ratner each deny allegations by model Keri Claussen Khalighi that she was forced to perform sex act on Simmons, and that he and Ratner ‘were in it together’Russell Simmons, the hip-hop mogul who co-founded Def Jam Recordings,...

    Def Jam co-founder and Ratner each deny allegations by model Keri Claussen Khalighi that she was forced to perform sex act on Simmons, and that he and Ratner ‘were in it together’

    Russell Simmons, the hip-hop mogul who co-founded Def Jam Recordings, has been accused of sexual assault amid new accusations against the Hollywood film producer and director Brett Ratner.

    Model Keri Claussen Khalighi alleges that in 1991, when she was 17, she was invited by Simmons and Ratner to Simmons’ apartment to look at a music video the pair were working on. She says that Simmons tore off her clothes and attempted to force her to have sex. “I fought it wildly,” she told the LA Times, saying she eventually “acquiesced”.

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    Five of the best distilleries on the American Whiskey Trail

    Five of the best distilleries on the American Whiskey Trail


    As sales of Kentucky bourbon and Tennessee whiskey have rocketed, so has interest in the terroir of the region, and distilleries – Jack Daniel’s and Wild Turkey included – have opened for toursUS whiskey has experienced dramatic growth over the...

    As sales of Kentucky bourbon and Tennessee whiskey have rocketed, so has interest in the terroir of the region, and distilleries – Jack Daniel’s and Wild Turkey included – have opened for tours

    US whiskey has experienced dramatic growth over the last decade, propelled by an unslakable thirst for it from Europe, China and India. But while the spirits themselves – mostly bourbon, Tennessee whiskey and rye – have gained distinction worldwide, their places of origin remain somewhat mysterious. This has a lot to do with their terroirs, Kentucky and Tennessee – two southern states that are low on the destination list for many visiting Europeans. The fact that some counties in these states are dry and until recently wouldn’t allow their distilleries to offer tastings, has further complicated matters.

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    More than just a numbers game – how a shirt can define a player’s career | Barry Glendenning

    More than just a numbers game – how a shirt can define a player’s career | Barry Glendenning


    Yado Mambo and the Ebbsfleet United No5 shirt offered a reminder of how the shirt number a player wears can affect how they are perceivedIf the evidence presented in the opening week of the US Justice Department’s Fifa corruption trial was not grim...

    Yado Mambo and the Ebbsfleet United No5 shirt offered a reminder of how the shirt number a player wears can affect how they are perceived

    If the evidence presented in the opening week of the US Justice Department’s Fifa corruption trial was not grim enough, the recent sight of a footballer named Mambo not wearing No5 provided further evidence that the game is to all intents and purposes “gone”. During a televised National League match between his side and Leyton Orient, the Ebbsfleet United central defender Yado Mambo became an unlikely social media talking point when viewers noticed the 26-year-old’s club had missed a trick by failing to allocate him the obvious digit as an homage to that 1999 Lou Bega smash‑hit dancefloor filler. “Imagine signing a player called Mambo and not giving him the No5 shirt,” mused one Twitter user under a screengrab of Mambo wearing No18. “Poor form from Ebbsfleet United.”

    Speaking to Radio Kent at the height of his Warholian 15 minutes, Mambo revealed that he had in fact requested the shirt number in question before the season started, but had been turned down by spoilsport Ebbsfleet manager, Daryl McMahon. “I told my gaffer the same thing, but I don’t think he believed me until over this weekend, when it has just blown up all over social media,” he said. “Maybe now he’ll take it a bit more seriously and change the numbers next season. [Mambo No5] was one of my favourite songs at that age. At school a lot of kids used to sing it to me.”

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    West Ham fans urged to stop calling 999 to complain about team’s performances

    West Ham fans urged to stop calling 999 to complain about team’s performances


    • Essex police tweet message to disgruntled Hammers supporters• West Ham in relegation zone after defeat to Watford on SundayWest Ham United fans have been warned to stop calling 999 to complain about their team. The side suffered a 2-0 defeat at...

    • Essex police tweet message to disgruntled Hammers supporters
    • West Ham in relegation zone after defeat to Watford on Sunday

    West Ham United fans have been warned to stop calling 999 to complain about their team. The side suffered a 2-0 defeat at Watford on Sunday in David Moyes’s first match in charge, with goals from Will Hughes and Richarlison settling the match at Vicarage Road.

    Related: West Ham's Andy Carroll leaves his mark on Watford but barely troubles the match | Simon Burnton

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    A gold star for the nurseries that have stopped being glitter bugs | Jules Howard

    A gold star for the nurseries that have stopped being glitter bugs | Jules Howard


    As well as polluting our seas with microplastics, the devilish dandruff turns up all over my house and about my person – I applaud those schools banning itWhat will the rocks record about the lives we lead? What might a future palaeontologist, human or...

    As well as polluting our seas with microplastics, the devilish dandruff turns up all over my house and about my person – I applaud those schools banning it

    What will the rocks record about the lives we lead? What might a future palaeontologist, human or otherwise, make of the structures that will come to signify these moments in which you and I live our lives? They will notice extinctions, of course. Fossils of mammals’ tusks and horns will abound in the rocks, only to disappear when we humans turn up. They will come across our mines – enormous trace fossils, perhaps the largest ever to have existed. They will see, by studying fossil pollen, that the climate changed. They will find our discarded KFC bones and they will wonder how the world supported so many chickens. And there, among it all, they will probably find that most awful of human inventions: glitter. Oodles of it – purples, pinks and reds – crushed into rocks the world over. Mineralised madness. Our lowest ebb. What will those future palaeontologists make of it? What will glitter say about us?

    Perhaps this is our mark in the geological strata. A post-glitter epoch that all started with a handful of nurseries

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    Tech revolution is coming to healthcare - GPs must be part of it | Richard Vize

    Tech revolution is coming to healthcare - GPs must be part of it | Richard Vize


    Smartphones offer an opportunity to get information into the hands of those who need it most; complaining from the sidelines is futileThe launch of the GP at Hand app-based primary care service in London has been met with accusations that it is damaging...

    Smartphones offer an opportunity to get information into the hands of those who need it most; complaining from the sidelines is futile

    The launch of the GP at Hand app-based primary care service in London has been met with accusations that it is damaging the NHS.

    The service is being run by a practice in Fulham, but people across central London are able to move their GP registration there. It offers video consultations 24/7 and face to face appointments at five clinics so far. It uses technology provided by Babylon Health, which bills itself as “the world’s first AI-driven healthcare service”.

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    Barack and Michelle Obama pay tribute to Diana Ross at 2017 American music awards - video

    Barack and Michelle Obama pay tribute to Diana Ross at 2017 American music awards - video


    The former president and first lady congratulate Diana Ross before she accepts her lifetime achievement award at the American music awards. The 73-year-old performed a medley of hits before accepting her award, accompanied by her extended...

    The former president and first lady congratulate Diana Ross before she accepts her lifetime achievement award at the American music awards. The 73-year-old performed a medley of hits before accepting her award, accompanied by her extended family 

    American music awards: A-listers absent and women underserved in night of missed opportunity
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    It was John Hume, not Sinn Féin, who steered Northern Ireland to peace | Seamus Mallon

    It was John Hume, not Sinn Féin, who steered Northern Ireland to peace | Seamus Mallon


    Sinn Féin and the DUP have squeezed the hope out of long-suffering people. They should remember Hume’s vision for partnershipA documentary film that premiered in Ireland at the weekend examines the role of the Nobel laureate and former SDLP leader...

    Sinn Féin and the DUP have squeezed the hope out of long-suffering people. They should remember Hume’s vision for partnership

    A documentary film that premiered in Ireland at the weekend examines the role of the Nobel laureate and former SDLP leader John Hume in seeking to engage the United States in the Northern Ireland peace process.

    I was very reluctant to see In the Name of Peace: John Hume in America, and even more reluctant to write about it. My fears were based on previous films about Ireland, which reeked of sentimentality, “old sod” songs and stories, and the dreaded “shamrockery” associated with Ireland in the US. But here we see how skilled practitioners of the art of politics can clearly define their objectives and remain aloof from all distractions that would essentially weaken their resolve.

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    England’s Jake Ball ready to face Australia in first Ashes Test at the Gabba

    England’s Jake Ball ready to face Australia in first Ashes Test at the Gabba


    • Seamer expected to be play in Brisbane after recovering from injury• Ball backs England to edge close seriesJake Ball is out to prove himself in Australia after returning to full fitness in the nick of time for an Ashes debut.Ball made a brief but...

    • Seamer expected to be play in Brisbane after recovering from injury
    • Ball backs England to edge close series

    Jake Ball is out to prove himself in Australia after returning to full fitness in the nick of time for an Ashes debut.

    Ball made a brief but lasting impression at the start of the tour before straining ankle ligaments when he lost his footing in his delivery stride this month.

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    Revolution by Emmanuel Macron review – what’s the big idea, Monsieur President?

    Revolution by Emmanuel Macron review – what’s the big idea, Monsieur President?


    The French leader’s bestseller unwittingly sheds light on his shortcomingsEmmanuel Macron is by no means the first president of France to fancy himself as a man of letters. Charles de Gaulle and François Mitterrand immediately come to mind as his most...

    The French leader’s bestseller unwittingly sheds light on his shortcomings

    Emmanuel Macron is by no means the first president of France to fancy himself as a man of letters. Charles de Gaulle and François Mitterrand immediately come to mind as his most recent literary predecessors. This is partly because, although Macron has only been in power a handful of months, he shares with De Gaulle and Mitterrand a vision of the “grandeur” of France. In recent times, however, for good and bad reasons, writes Macron in this book, many French people have lost sight of this. Macron’s first duty as president, he goes on to say, is therefore to restore a broken and gloomy France to its former glory and to make French people believe in themselves and their nation. If you like, Macron’s great political ambition is then to make France “grande” again. But how exactly will he do this?

    Ostensibly, the first aim of Revolution is to answer this question. This is why, when it was first published in France in November 2016, it was a bestseller. The mainstream French public was hungry to know what solutions Macron had up his sleeve – indeed, in the unstable climate of the past few years, they needed to be reassured that there might be any solutions at all.

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    Labour attacks universal credit as 'not fit for purpose'

    Labour attacks universal credit as 'not fit for purpose'


    Opposition calls for major changes, including cuts to the six-week period that claimants have to wait for paymentsLabour has unveiled a list of demands to improve the rollout of universal credit, seeking to keep up the pressure on Philip Hammond over the...

    Opposition calls for major changes, including cuts to the six-week period that claimants have to wait for payments

    Labour has unveiled a list of demands to improve the rollout of universal credit, seeking to keep up the pressure on Philip Hammond over the issue before Wednesday’s budget.

    The shadow pensions secretary, Debbie Abrahams, has written to the chancellor demanding changes to UC, which Labour and other critics say is putting people in debt as it is rolled out into new parts of the country.

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    IMF says wages will be ‘slow to rise’ but low interest rates will last for years

    IMF says wages will be ‘slow to rise’ but low interest rates will last for years


    International Monetary Fund says conditions suggest pickup in growth on its way but warns it would only be modestThe International Monetary Fund has said the conditions seem right for a pickup in growth in Australia but warned it would only be modest,...

    International Monetary Fund says conditions suggest pickup in growth on its way but warns it would only be modest

    The International Monetary Fund has said the conditions seem right for a pickup in growth in Australia but warned it would only be modest, with record-low wage growth weighing on household incomes.

    It has also predicted Australia’s ultra-low interest rate environment will persist for years, saying a sustained rise in inflation will come about only when the economy has been at full employment “for some time”.

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    Premier League: 10 talking points from the weekend’s action

    Premier League: 10 talking points from the weekend’s action


    Hugo Lloris’s top-four focus for Spurs is telling, Callum Wilson is making up for lost time and can Paul Pogba yet be compared with Steven Gerrard?After challenging for the title for the past couple of seasons, it was significant to hear Hugo Lloris...

    Hugo Lloris’s top-four focus for Spurs is telling, Callum Wilson is making up for lost time and can Paul Pogba yet be compared with Steven Gerrard?

    After challenging for the title for the past couple of seasons, it was significant to hear Hugo Lloris contemplate looking over Tottenham Hotspur’s shoulder more than in front of them at the end of a derby defeat. “Oh, before we think about [the leaders] Man City it’s important to stay in the top four. This is the main target for our team,” he said. “We heard from outside that Tottenham play for the title, blah, blah, blah. The most important thing is to stay consistent in the league.” The difficulty imposing themselves on the most challenging away fixtures remains a sticking point. Having lost at Old Trafford and Arsenal in recent weeks, next month they visit the Premier League’s pace setters at the Etihad Stadium. Spurs found it hard to penetrate Arsenal’s defence, and when Mauricio Pochettino subbed off Harry Kane and Dele Alli neither could feel they had been at their most influential. “The spirit was good, we were in the fight and able to develop our game with the ball in the floor. But in the final third we need more aggression and movement,” Lloris said. “Now we need to carry on. It’s true that we wanted to do more against Manchester United and Arsenal. Unfortunately we couldn’t do that so now it’s important to have a run of victories because we need to keep our place at the top.” Amy Lawrence

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    Dear chancellor, it's time to end public spending austerity | Gareth Davies

    Dear chancellor, it's time to end public spending austerity | Gareth Davies


    Philip Hammond has little room for manoeuvre on public services, but needs to act on housing and health, as well as letting councils know where they standBy early afternoon on 22 November, we will know the chancellor’s answers for next year to the two...

    Philip Hammond has little room for manoeuvre on public services, but needs to act on housing and health, as well as letting councils know where they stand

    By early afternoon on 22 November, we will know the chancellor’s answers for next year to the two eternal questions of public spending – how big is the pie and which services are getting bigger slices?

    On the first question, the evidence from the general election in June and more recent surveys of public opinion suggests that people are noticing the impact of the long squeeze on public spending on the services they and their families use. Public support for further spending cuts in frontline services has reduced even if this means delaying the planned elimination of the annual deficit.

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    A new disaster looms for British Virgin Islands: how to clean up hurricane mess

    A new disaster looms for British Virgin Islands: how to clean up hurricane mess


    With the economy wrecked and tourist season approaching, dealing with washed-up boats, cars and thousands of tonnes of storm debris is an urgent priorityHow the Midway Bar came to be destroyed is not in doubt: a 42ft sailing catamaran hangs 10ft above...

    With the economy wrecked and tourist season approaching, dealing with washed-up boats, cars and thousands of tonnes of storm debris is an urgent priority

    How the Midway Bar came to be destroyed is not in doubt: a 42ft sailing catamaran hangs 10ft above the former bar-room, still wedged in the ruins more than two months after Hurricane Irma made landfall in the British Virgin Islands (BVI).

    But how it will ever be restored remains unclear: the Sundowner is just one of hundreds of wrecked boats still littered across the island – tossed ashore, dumped on the seabed or torn to pieces by Irma and its sister storm Maria.

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    Behind the 'Medellín miracle': why the smart kids are going to hip-hop school

    Behind the 'Medellín miracle': why the smart kids are going to hip-hop school


    Every night across the world’s former murder capital, young boys and girls study the four elements of hip-hop to transform a generation – and rehabilitate a city“When my family moved to Medellín, all I could see was drugs, violence and...

    Every night across the world’s former murder capital, young boys and girls study the four elements of hip-hop to transform a generation – and rehabilitate a city

    “When my family moved to Medellín, all I could see was drugs, violence and prostitution,” says Zuleima Pérez, 21. “My best hope was to get married, have kids and find some basic job. This school allowed me to think bigger.”

    Around us, in the graffitied courtyard of a high school in Aranjuez – formerly the most notorious of Medellín’s barrios – kids of all ages mill about. Bass spills from the adjoining classrooms. In one room, an exasperated teacher is leading infants in a warm-up; in another, teens are being marshalled in breakdancing exercises with the intensity of a military drill. Upstairs, a group of twentysomethings contort to a remix of Notorious BIG’s Kick in the Door.

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    Gorgeous creatures of NYC Downlow captured in 3D – in pictures

    Gorgeous creatures of NYC Downlow captured in 3D – in pictures


    Artist Kate Bones combines film and digital technology to create vibrant gif portraits – like these from Glastonbury’s gay nightclub Kate Bones shoots her subjects on a hacked 1980s 3D film camera and brings them alive as animated gifs. These...

    Artist Kate Bones combines film and digital technology to create vibrant gif portraits – like these from Glastonbury’s gay nightclub

    Kate Bones shoots her subjects on a hacked 1980s 3D film camera and brings them alive as animated gifs. These portraits taken earlier this year at Glastonbury’s NYC Downlow, the festival’s gay nightclub, give a close-up view of performers usually only photographed on stage.

    A warehouse party to raise money for a new London home for the cult club’s creators, Block9, will be held on 9-10 December at the Silver Building in London.

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    The night Barbuda died: how Hurricane Irma created a Caribbean ghost town

    The night Barbuda died: how Hurricane Irma created a Caribbean ghost town


    Two and a half months after Barbuda was battered by 185mph winds, the island remains ruined and largely uninhabitated. Now locals are questioning if people will ever returnWalking the streets of the small Caribbean island of Barbuda on a Friday...

    Two and a half months after Barbuda was battered by 185mph winds, the island remains ruined and largely uninhabitated. Now locals are questioning if people will ever return

    Walking the streets of the small Caribbean island of Barbuda on a Friday afternoon, you are likely to see more goats than humans.

    Dogs, cats and horses, all of which roam freely about the island now that fences are down, also seem to outnumber people. The streets are empty and the houses – at least the ones still standing – are abandoned. The island is like a ghost town.

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    American music awards: A-listers absent and women underserved in night of missed opportunity

    American music awards: A-listers absent and women underserved in night of missed opportunity


    The 2017 AMAs promised to be political and empowering but – with a few exceptions – delivered the same old formula that feels less urgent than ever“This year, perhaps more than any in recent history, we needed the power of music to help us escape...

    The 2017 AMAs promised to be political and empowering but – with a few exceptions – delivered the same old formula that feels less urgent than ever

    “This year, perhaps more than any in recent history, we needed the power of music to help us escape the news of the day,” announced Jamie Foxx during the cold open to the 2017 American music awards, before introducing Pink and Kelly Clarkson’s somber rendition of R.E.M.’s Everybody Hurts. “We needed that power to help us heal from hurricanes, wildfires, hate, and hatred-fueled violence.”

    On a night that celebrated the achievements of pioneers including Whitney Houston and Diana Ross, while conferring its awards upon a slew of young white men including Niall Horan, Shawn Mendes and the Chainsmokers, the 45th annual American music awards oscillated between rejecting and reaffirming 2017’s national political moment.

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    Danny Care’s blazing cameo adds a final flourish for England’s late bloomers

    Danny Care’s blazing cameo adds a final flourish for England’s late bloomers


    • England 30-6 Australia• Replacement sets up two tries and scores one to underline squad depthIt is just over two years since Australia beat England 33-13 in London to knock the hosts out of the Rugby World Cup. Since then it has been an entirely...

    • England 30-6 Australia
    • Replacement sets up two tries and scores one to underline squad depth

    It is just over two years since Australia beat England 33-13 in London to knock the hosts out of the Rugby World Cup. Since then it has been an entirely different: played five, won five at an average of just under 35 points per game. The squad floored by the Wallabies in 2015 – and England’s starting XV on Saturday contained eight survivors – has bounced back with a vengeance.

    As Eddie Jones is well aware, there remains further scope for improvement. But this was a highly significant win psychologically, despite the fact that a record English margin of victory disguised the tightness of the contest. Even New Zealand do not have a more consistent recent record against the Wallabies and, if Samoa are put away this Saturday, England will have won 22 of 23 games under Jones’s stewardship.

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    Chhattisgarh: the heart of rural India

    Chhattisgarh: the heart of rural India


    Kate Eshelby and family enjoy the pristine lands and age-old ways of the people of Chhattisgarh stateThree men in huge straw hats covered in peacock feathers and tinsel are playing wooden flutes as they herd cows and water buffalo on the edge of the...

    Kate Eshelby and family enjoy the pristine lands and age-old ways of the people of Chhattisgarh state

    Three men in huge straw hats covered in peacock feathers and tinsel are playing wooden flutes as they herd cows and water buffalo on the edge of the jungle. Even the animals sport necklaces of bright flowers.

    This is Chhattisgarh state, in east-central India: little visited, yet rewarding, it’s a land of elusive leopards, tigers and animist beliefs that gained independence from neighbouring Madhya Pradesh in 2000. I’m here with my husband Mark and our two boys, aged four and two. This may sound an unusual choice for a family holiday but Chhattisgarh works, because it’s quiet and rural and free of India’s city chaos.

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    Hong Kong: 20% of residents live in poverty

    Hong Kong: 20% of residents live in poverty


    The number of people living below the poverty line rose to 1.35 million in 2016, despite economic growthA record number of Hong Kong residents live in poverty, with one fifth of the population falling below the poverty line despite economic growth,...

    The number of people living below the poverty line rose to 1.35 million in 2016, despite economic growth

    A record number of Hong Kong residents live in poverty, with one fifth of the population falling below the poverty line despite economic growth, according to new government figures.

    The number of people living below the poverty line rose to 1.35 million in 2016, about 20% of the city’s population. The number is the highest number of poor since the government began publishing statistics in 2009.

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    Critical week for Syria as parallel talks get under way

    Critical week for Syria as parallel talks get under way


    Leaders of Russia, Turkey and Iran to meet in Sochi to push ceasefire and constitution plan as Assad’s opponents convene in RiyadhWith a flurry of diplomatic activity, two separate summits on Syria are to be staged this week to put decisive pressure on...

    Leaders of Russia, Turkey and Iran to meet in Sochi to push ceasefire and constitution plan as Assad’s opponents convene in Riyadh

    With a flurry of diplomatic activity, two separate summits on Syria are to be staged this week to put decisive pressure on both sides to end the civil war and thrash out a new constitution that is likely to leave President Bashar al-Assad in power.

    With Islamic State crushed and the democratic opposition to Assad also in military retreat, the three key regional powers – Russia, Iran and Turkey – will meet in the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi on Wednesday to discuss how to wind down hostilities and draw up a political settlement.

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    Jeffrey Tambor on assault allegations: 'I don't see how I can return to Transparent'

    Jeffrey Tambor on assault allegations: 'I don't see how I can return to Transparent'


    Pressure is mounting on Amazon to find a new lead for the show, after actor Trace Lysette became the second woman to accuse Tambor of sexual harassmentJeffrey Tambor, the Emmy-winning star of the Amazon web series Transparent, has said he does not see...

    Pressure is mounting on Amazon to find a new lead for the show, after actor Trace Lysette became the second woman to accuse Tambor of sexual harassment

    Jeffrey Tambor, the Emmy-winning star of the Amazon web series Transparent, has said he does not see how he could return to the show next season, after a second woman levelled allegations of sexual harassment against him.

    Actress Trace Lysette accused Tambor last week of making sexually charged remarks to her during as they worked together on the groundbreaking comedy series, as well as acting inappropriately during one alleged incident that “got physical”.

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    Shkodran Mustafi insists Arsenal have the self-belief to prove doubters wrong

    Shkodran Mustafi insists Arsenal have the self-belief to prove doubters wrong


    Defender calls on his team-mates to build on Tottenham victory as Arsène Wenger hails German’s role in north London derby triumphLee Dixon tells an eye-opening story in the film 89 about being pinned up against the wall of the dressing room by his own...

    Defender calls on his team-mates to build on Tottenham victory as Arsène Wenger hails German’s role in north London derby triumph

    Lee Dixon tells an eye-opening story in the film 89 about being pinned up against the wall of the dressing room by his own team‑mates before his first north London derby. He was warned, in no uncertain terms, that if he did not perform in this game of all games he would be in trouble. It is hard to imagine that in the modern game such threats would be part of a pre-match routine, but the words said within the Arsenal camp last week to gee them up for the visit of Tottenham Hotspur certainly had a motivating effect.

    In the intensity of their play, in their body language, this was a different kind of Arsenal to the one that has a tendency to freeze up and feel the fear creeping in during high-pressure games. They seemed to relish the situation. Héctor Bellerín let out some kind of primal roar as he headed down the tunnel at half-time in recognition of a two-goal lead his team would not relinquish. Mesut Özil at one point hoiked an agricultural clearance 40 yards straight up into the air – as un-Özil-esque a technique as you could ever imagine – to clamourous acclaim. Alexis Sánchez rediscovered his appetite for careering around the pitch chasing every cause going.

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    Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s long-term injury was ‘more severe than revealed’

    Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s long-term injury was ‘more severe than revealed’


    • ‘If people knew the real injury they would be in shock that I was playing’• Manchester United forward returned to action in win against NewcastleZlatan Ibrahimovic has revealed the career threatening injury he sustained in April was more than...

    • ‘If people knew the real injury they would be in shock that I was playing’
    • Manchester United forward returned to action in win against Newcastle

    Zlatan Ibrahimovic has revealed the career threatening injury he sustained in April was more than the “significant knee ligament damage” that Manchester United characterised it as being at the time.

    The Swede made his comeback in the 4-1 win against Newcastle United at Old Trafford on Saturday, entering proceedings on 77 minutes as a replacement for Anthony Martial. It was the 36‑year‑old’s first action since sustaining the injury on 20 April playing against Anderlecht in the Europa League.

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    Grigor Dimitrov edges out David Goffin in thriller to win World Tour Finals title

    Grigor Dimitrov edges out David Goffin in thriller to win World Tour Finals title


    • Bulgarian up to world No3 after biggest win of career• Finalists overcome early nerves to deliver epic matchAgainst the expectations of the doubters two free-hitting, first-time finalists, each trusting his skills to breaking point, gave a...

    • Bulgarian up to world No3 after biggest win of career
    • Finalists overcome early nerves to deliver epic match

    Against the expectations of the doubters two free-hitting, first-time finalists, each trusting his skills to breaking point, gave a remarkable season the denouement it deserved on a cold midwinter’s evening by the Thames. Grigor Dimitrov won but David Goffin did not leave a loser.

    For extended passages of the deciding match of the 2017 ATP World Tour Finals they brought freshness and daring to a task that has historically been fulfilled by more illustrious rivals. After two and a half hours of often tense, high-grade tennis – the longest final since John McEnroe defeated Arthur Ashe at Madison Square Garden in 1978 – Dimitrov,Bulgaria’s first representative at this end-of-year event, prevailed 7-5, 4-6, 6-3.

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    Search for new Sinn Féin leader begins after Gerry Adams steps  down

    Search for new Sinn Féin leader begins after Gerry Adams steps down


    Michelle O’Neill, Irish republican party’s leader in Northern Ireland assembly, rules herself out, saying she has ‘enough to do’Sinn Féin is starting the process of selecting its new leader after Gerry Adams announced he was stepping down after...

    Michelle O’Neill, Irish republican party’s leader in Northern Ireland assembly, rules herself out, saying she has ‘enough to do’

    Sinn Féin is starting the process of selecting its new leader after Gerry Adams announced he was stepping down after 34 years in charge.

    The Irish republican party’s leader in the deadlocked Northern Ireland assembly, Michelle O’Neill, has ruled herself out of the running to succeed Adams, who played a pivotal role in shifting the IRA to a permanent ceasefire in the 1990s and nudged Sinn Féin towards embracing power sharing with their former unionist enemies in Northern Ireland.

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    This government is falling apart, so Labour’s tribes must come together | Zoe Williams

    This government is falling apart, so Labour’s tribes must come together | Zoe Williams


    With the great prize in sight, it’s time for Corbynites and their doubters to recognise common groundThe Tories’ main problem with Jeremy Corbyn and the shadow chancellor, John McDonnell, is that they speak human. Critics rush at the opposition like...

    With the great prize in sight, it’s time for Corbynites and their doubters to recognise common ground

    The Tories’ main problem with Jeremy Corbyn and the shadow chancellor, John McDonnell, is that they speak human. Critics rush at the opposition like Wile E Coyote, carrying boulders and anvils marked “Maoist cult” (© Tim Farron) and “Marxist radical”, then wonder how McDonnell scuttles behind them with a cheerful “meep meep”. The Labour leadership is not pretending to be moderate, it’s trying to change the definition of moderation. They’re not smuggling ideology into some “common sense”, they’re attempting – with some success – to upend the consensus. In the art of persuasion, there’s nothing quite like believing what you’re saying. It bestows authenticity upon your entire character, makes you memorable in your hobbies and foibles: I can imagine Mr and Mrs McDonnell incompetently sailing together as he described in Sunday’s Observer, and the Corbyns chopping onions. In the domestic lives of the Mays and the Hammonds, I see nothing; empty rooms, polished tables with neat little notes about tax-efficiency schemes.

    What would really distinguish it, ahead of an election that cannot be far off, would be to foster generosity and trust

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    Hamleys Christmas toy parade – in pictures

    Hamleys Christmas toy parade – in pictures


    Regent Street in central London is lined with people watching the annual Hamleys toy parade, featuring a marching cast of children’s characters, entertainers, elves, bands, floats and flying balloons Continue...

    Regent Street in central London is lined with people watching the annual Hamleys toy parade, featuring a marching cast of children’s characters, entertainers, elves, bands, floats and flying balloons

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    The ‘no unemployment’ chancellor needs a budget of compassion | Matthew d’Ancona

    The ‘no unemployment’ chancellor needs a budget of compassion | Matthew d’Ancona


    The failing Tories are wrong to see Wednesday’s budget as their saviour. But by showing some humility, Philip Hammond can start the rehabilitationLike one of those gloomy American highways lined with liquor stores and gun shops, the road this...

    The failing Tories are wrong to see Wednesday’s budget as their saviour. But by showing some humility, Philip Hammond can start the rehabilitation

    Like one of those gloomy American highways lined with liquor stores and gun shops, the road this government limps along is distinguished only by a series of last-chance saloons. Since the Conservatives’ disastrous performance in the election, we have been told that the prime minister’s Florence speech on Brexit would restore her authority, unite the party and energise her administration; then the Tory conference in Manchester (cough); and now – most absurdly – Philip Hammond’s budget on Wednesday.

    Related: There are no unemployed in UK, says Hammond in TV gaffe

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    Choosing what to correct or clarify is presenting new challenges | Open door | Paul Chadwick

    Choosing what to correct or clarify is presenting new challenges | Open door | Paul Chadwick


    As the shift to digital continues, the corrections column in the paper may need to devote less time and space to items below the threshold of ‘significant error’Among the 30,000 contacts we receive from readers each year, how should we decide what...

    As the shift to digital continues, the corrections column in the paper may need to devote less time and space to items below the threshold of ‘significant error’

    Among the 30,000 contacts we receive from readers each year, how should we decide what needs correcting or clarifying?

    This one, from the Guardian in 2003, surely chose itself:

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    New head of Macron's party vows to recapture its grassroots 'soul'

    New head of Macron's party vows to recapture its grassroots 'soul'


    Christophe Castaner, 51, was handpicked by French president, but appointment sparks criticism of ‘undemocratic’ practices A fiercely loyal, self-styled “man of the people” has been appointed to lead Emmanuel Macron’s fledgling political...

    Christophe Castaner, 51, was handpicked by French president, but appointment sparks criticism of ‘undemocratic’ practices

    A fiercely loyal, self-styled “man of the people” has been appointed to lead Emmanuel Macron’s fledgling political movement, La République En Marche (The Republic on the Move, or La REM), promising to recapture the party’s“soul” after a hiatus since the recent election win.

    Christophe Castaner, 51, a burly member of parliament with a southern accent, styles himself as both in touch with everyday voters and devoted to Macron’s well-oiled communications machine. He was handpicked by the French president to take over the running of La REM.

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    I saw how we failed Bill Clinton's accusers. We can't do that again | Yolanda Wu

    I saw how we failed Bill Clinton's accusers. We can't do that again | Yolanda Wu


    When Paula Jones filed suit against Clinton, I was assigned the task of analyzing the merits of her case. Looking back, we could have done much moreIn 1998, I was a young lawyer at the Now Legal Defense and Education Fund specializing in sexual...

    When Paula Jones filed suit against Clinton, I was assigned the task of analyzing the merits of her case. Looking back, we could have done much more

    In 1998, I was a young lawyer at the Now Legal Defense and Education Fund specializing in sexual harassment law. The US supreme court had just cleared the way for Paula Jones to sue President Clinton, ruling that he was not entitled to immunity from civil litigation for acts committed before he assumed office.

    I no longer practice law, but one of the few things I’ve kept in a file is the legal memorandum I wrote assessing Jones’s legal claims against Clinton. I don’t know why I’ve never thrown it away. Maybe the situation never felt resolved to me. Maybe I hoped that the day would come when sexual harassment would be recognized more fully.

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    States of disgrace: strange American laws – in pictures

    States of disgrace: strange American laws – in pictures


    The New York-based photographer Olivia Locher became interested in peculiar laws when a friend mentioned that it is illegal to have an ice-cream cone in your back pocket in Alabama. “For some reason that idea haunted my thoughts for several months,”...

    The New York-based photographer Olivia Locher became interested in peculiar laws when a friend mentioned that it is illegal to have an ice-cream cone in your back pocket in Alabama. “For some reason that idea haunted my thoughts for several months,” she says. Locher began to research more of these laws, and decided to recreate them for a new project. “They were all very visually appealing and I knew I wanted to photograph them.” Her book I Fought the Law (Chronicle Books, £12.99) is a collection of 50 images – one representing each US state. “I Fought the Law is not a place to look for cut-and-dried facts,” says Locher, “but hopefully it can open up people’s minds to larger issues.”

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    ‘We lost a great leader’: Berta Cáceres still inspires as murder case takes fresh twist | Liz Ford

    ‘We lost a great leader’: Berta Cáceres still inspires as murder case takes fresh twist | Liz Ford


    As friends and followers of the late Honduran activist continue her battle for indigenous land rights, their cause has been boosted by a damning legal report María Santos Domínguez heard about the death of her good friend Berta Cáceres on the radio....

    As friends and followers of the late Honduran activist continue her battle for indigenous land rights, their cause has been boosted by a damning legal report

    María Santos Domínguez heard about the death of her good friend Berta Cáceres on the radio. She had just given birth to her youngest daughter, so she wasn’t with Cáceres the week she was murdered.

    “It was a double blow because we were very close, we worked together in the communities,” said Santos Domínguez, a coordinator for the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organisations of Honduras (Copinh), the organisation Cáceres co-founded 24 years ago to stop the state selling off the country’s ancestral lands to multinational companies.

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    ‘It was an extraordinary speech’: the day I met Martin Luther King

    ‘It was an extraordinary speech’: the day I met Martin Luther King


    Nick Nicholson meets the civil rights leader at Newcastle University, November 1967Fifty years ago, on 13 November 1967, Newcastle University awarded an honorary degree to Martin Luther King. It was the only UK university to do so in his lifetime, and...

    Nick Nicholson meets the civil rights leader at Newcastle University, November 1967

    Fifty years ago, on 13 November 1967, Newcastle University awarded an honorary degree to Martin Luther King. It was the only UK university to do so in his lifetime, and the speech he made that day is the last time he spoke outside the US before he was assassinated five months later.

    Newcastle was seen as a modern institution, having broken away from Durham in 1963. I was president of the student council and, along with a dozen other students, met King for coffee an hour before the ceremony. We were wearing our best (and only) suits; we must have seemed very English and conservative. I am from a working-class family and was the first to go to university: it was such an honour to meet him. This photograph appeared widely in Newcastle at the time – the others pictured were presidents of various student associations.

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    It's a husky's life, Finnish Lapland: travel photo of the week

    It's a husky's life, Finnish Lapland: travel photo of the week


    Photographer Brice Portolano specialises in capturing lives lived close to nature in remote spots. His Arctic series looks at the life of a husky sledder who lives in a cabin in northern Finland Continue...

    Photographer Brice Portolano specialises in capturing lives lived close to nature in remote spots. His Arctic series looks at the life of a husky sledder who lives in a cabin in northern Finland

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    Be very afraid … robots can now do backflips - video

    Be very afraid … robots can now do backflips - video


    Not content with simply walking or carrying objects, Atlas, made by the robotics firm Boston Dynamics, can now jump across gaps, jump and spin 180°, and – most impressive of all – it can backflip, even using its arms to balance after landing just...

    Not content with simply walking or carrying objects, Atlas, made by the robotics firm Boston Dynamics, can now jump across gaps, jump and spin 180°, and – most impressive of all – it can backflip, even using its arms to balance after landing just like a real gymnast

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    A mission for journalism in a time of crisis

    A mission for journalism in a time of crisis


    In a turbulent era, the media must define its values and principles, writes Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner‘No former period, in the history of our Country, has been marked by the agitation of questions of a more important character than those...

    In a turbulent era, the media must define its values and principles, writes Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner

    ‘No former period, in the history of our Country, has been marked by the agitation of questions of a more important character than those which are now claiming the attention of the public.” So began the announcement, nearly 200 years ago, of a brand-new newspaper to be published in Manchester, England, which proclaimed that “the spirited discussion of political questions” and “the accurate detail of facts” were “particularly important at this juncture”.

    Now we are living through another extraordinary period in history: one defined by dazzling political shocks and the disruptive impact of new technologies in every part of our lives. The public sphere has changed more radically in the past two decades than in the previous two centuries – and news organisations, including this one, have worked hard to adjust.

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    Joseph Stiglitz on why Trump is unfit to be US president - video

    Joseph Stiglitz on why Trump is unfit to be US president - video


    The economist and author of Globalisation and its Discontents talks to the Guardian's Larry Elliott about why he considers Donald Trump unfit to be US president. He says stagnant incomes, the opioid crisis and falling life expectancies all pointed...

    The economist and author of Globalisation and its Discontents talks to the Guardian's Larry Elliott about why he considers Donald Trump unfit to be US president. He says stagnant incomes, the opioid crisis and falling life expectancies all pointed towards a political problem in the US but no one imagined it leading to a Trump presidency

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    ‘For us, the land is sacred’: on the road with the defenders of the world’s forests

    ‘For us, the land is sacred’: on the road with the defenders of the world’s forests


    A busload of indigenous leaders have been crossing Europe to highlight their cause before the start of UN climate talks in BonnOf the many thousands of participants at the Bonn climate conference which begins on 6 November, there will arguably be none...

    A busload of indigenous leaders have been crossing Europe to highlight their cause before the start of UN climate talks in Bonn

    Of the many thousands of participants at the Bonn climate conference which begins on 6 November, there will arguably be none who come with as much hope, courage and anger as the busload of indigenous leaders who have been criss-crossing Europe over the past two weeks, on their way to the former German capital.

    The 20 activists on the tour represent forest communities that have been marginalised over centuries but are now increasingly recognised as important actors against climate change through their protection of carbon sinks.

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    Colombia's land battles shatter the peace in Cauca Valley – in pictures

    Colombia's land battles shatter the peace in Cauca Valley – in pictures


    As the peace deal opens up new areas to extractive industries, a long-running fight for land and the environment has erupted anew as indigenous communities try to reclaim their territory• Read more: Indigenous people of Colombia fighting for their...

    As the peace deal opens up new areas to extractive industries, a long-running fight for land and the environment has erupted anew as indigenous communities try to reclaim their territory

    Read more: Indigenous people of Colombia fighting for their lands

    The defenders: 158 environmental defenders killed so far this yearContinue reading...
    UK mining firm in court over claims it mistreated environmental activists

    UK mining firm in court over claims it mistreated environmental activists


    Peruvian lawsuit in London claims Xstrata should be liable for alleged police violence against demonstrators near Tintaya mineA UK-registered mining company, which is now part of Glencore, is facing claims in a London court that it hired security forces...

    Peruvian lawsuit in London claims Xstrata should be liable for alleged police violence against demonstrators near Tintaya mine

    A UK-registered mining company, which is now part of Glencore, is facing claims in a London court that it hired security forces to mistreat environmental activists protesting about a copper mine in Peru.

    Two demonstrators died and others were left with serious injuries following the confrontations which lasted for several days during May 2012 on a remote hillside in the Andes, the court has been told.

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