The Guardian

    West Indies v England: first ODI – live!

    West Indies v England: first ODI – live!


    Updates from the first ODI in BarbadosYou can email Rob here with your thoughtsThe Spin: Questions facing England ahead of the World Cup 3.13pm GMT3rd over: West Indies 17-0 (Gayle 3, Campbell 12) Gayle has started slowly, as you’d expect, and ignores...

    Updates from the first ODI in BarbadosYou can email Rob here with your thoughtsThe Spin: Questions facing England ahead of the World Cup

    3.13pm GMT

    3rd over: West Indies 17-0 (Gayle 3, Campbell 12) Gayle has started slowly, as you’d expect, and ignores a slower ball from Woakes outside off stump. He usually takes a bit of time to get his eye in during a T20 innings, never mind in ODIs. In other news, Campbell gets a fortunate boundary with an inside edge past the stumps. Woakes has started excellently, even if figures of 2-0-12-0 do not suggest as much.

    “Afternoon Rob,” says Andrew Benzeval. “Surely MJ Gatting’s ill-advised reverse sweep was the ‘87 final?”

    3.09pm GMT

    2nd over: West Indies 9-0 (Gayle 1, Campbell 6) Mark Wood shares the new ball. Gayle is hit on the pad, offering no stroke to Wood’s first delivery, but it’s too high for an LBW. This is a lively start from Wood, who jags one back to hit Gayle in the box; Gayle then gets off the mark with a single from his seventh delivery. That’s a good start from Wood - we haven’t seen his speeds yet but the reactions of the batsmen suggested it was rapid.

    “Wood and Plunkett?” sniffs Gary Naylor. “I’d have one of them and Willey for his left arm angle and aggression. But I’d bat him at No3 too, with a brief to tee off immediately, as he doesn’t need to get his eye in and, if he comes off once in a series, that’s 50 off 30 balls with plenty of batting to come.”

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    On the Basis of Sex review – Ruth Bader Ginsburg starts her ascent

    On the Basis of Sex review – Ruth Bader Ginsburg starts her ascent


    Felicity Jones plays the real-life US supreme court justice in a watchable drama about her personal struggle against injustice and prejudiceThere’s a bit of ham and cheese in this forthright, likable biopic celebrating the early career of legendary...

    Felicity Jones plays the real-life US supreme court justice in a watchable drama about her personal struggle against injustice and prejudice

    There’s a bit of ham and cheese in this forthright, likable biopic celebrating the early career of legendary lawyer and supreme court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The director is Mimi Leder, experienced in socking over the action in pictures like The Peacemaker (1997) and Deep Impact (1998) and efficiently dotting the i’s and crossing the t’s of every scene in her work on TV shows such as The West Wing and ER.

    Well, by-the-numbers this might be, but it’s watchable and sympathetic, with Felicity Jones and Armie Hammer sweetly idealistic in the youthful roles of Ruth and her devoted husband, Martin.

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    New York is right to ban hair discrimination. Now how about the UK? | Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff

    New York is right to ban hair discrimination. Now how about the UK? | Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff


    Many British black people are targeted on the basis of their hair, but now there is a precedent for dealing with thisNew York City’s new legal guidance on discrimination based on hairstyle is a thing of beauty. It points out that “there is a...

    Many British black people are targeted on the basis of their hair, but now there is a precedent for dealing with this

    New York City’s new legal guidance on discrimination based on hairstyle is a thing of beauty. It points out that “there is a widespread and fundamentally racist belief that black hairstyles are not suited for formal settings, and may be unhygienic, messy, disruptive, or unkempt”, and deems natural hair textures that are tightly coiled or tightly curled, and black hairstyles such as locs, cornrows, braids, fades, and afros, a protected racial characteristic. This means that is now illegal to target black people based on their hair or hairstyle at work, school or in any public place – and if you do, you may get fined.

    In a country where our elected representatives think it’s OK to describe ethnic minorities as having a “funny tinge” on live television, it appears that British conversations around the nature of hair texture and hairstyle discrimination, and how they intersect with race, are rudimentary at best. But now is the perfect time to consider the experiences of those of us living in Britain with kinky-coily hair, and whether Britain should introduce similar laws.

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    Tory modernising wing has been destroyed, say defecting trio of MPs

    Tory modernising wing has been destroyed, say defecting trio of MPs


    Anna Soubry, Sarah Wollaston and Heidi Allen quit party, citing Brexit and lurch to rightFollow all the day’s political developments - live updatesThree Conservatives have quit their party to join the new Independent Group of MPs, declaring that hard...

    Anna Soubry, Sarah Wollaston and Heidi Allen quit party, citing Brexit and lurch to right

    Follow all the day’s political developments - live updates

    Three Conservatives have quit their party to join the new Independent Group of MPs, declaring that hard Brexiters have taken over and the modernising wing of the party has been “destroyed”.

    Anna Soubry, Sarah Wollaston and Heidi Allen explained their decision to join the new grouping, founded this week by seven former Labour MPs, at a press conference on Wednesday afternoon.

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    Trump has turned foreign aid into shabby political theatre | Peter Beaumont

    Trump has turned foreign aid into shabby political theatre | Peter Beaumont


    Stalled relief supplies for Venezuela at the Colombian border are a stark illustration of Trump’s crudely transactional approach to aidIn their grey livery, the US Air Force C-17s shuttling into Camilo Daza airport in Cúcuta, Colombia, look more...

    Stalled relief supplies for Venezuela at the Colombian border are a stark illustration of Trump’s crudely transactional approach to aid

    In their grey livery, the US Air Force C-17s shuttling into Camilo Daza airport in Cúcuta, Colombia, look more belligerent than friendly – which is, perhaps, the point.

    In the city itself, the planes’ cargo – boxes labelled USAid and intended for distribution by the Venezuelan opposition just across the border – are accumulating in the town’s warehouses.

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    Steve Stricker confirmed as USA captain for 2020 Ryder Cup

    Steve Stricker confirmed as USA captain for 2020 Ryder Cup


    • 51-year-old handed honour in home state of Wisconsin• Stricker was vice-captain at last three eventsSteve Stricker will captain the United States in the 2020 Ryder Cup in his home state of Wisconsin, the PGA of America has announced.Stricker, who...

    • 51-year-old handed honour in home state of Wisconsin
    • Stricker was vice-captain at last three events

    Steve Stricker will captain the United States in the 2020 Ryder Cup in his home state of Wisconsin, the PGA of America has announced.

    Stricker, who lives just over two hours away from the host venue of Whistling Straits, has made three appearances in the biennial contest as a player, most recently when losing all four of his matches in Europe’s victory at Medinah in 2012.

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    Maurizio Sarri says Chelsea struggles are not down to his tactics

    Maurizio Sarri says Chelsea struggles are not down to his tactics


    • Sarri has not spoken to Abramovich or Granovskaia this week• Manager sees ‘problem of determination in both boxes’Maurizio Sarri has had no contact with the Chelsea hierarchy this week and has claimed the ferocious debate around his preferred...

    • Sarri has not spoken to Abramovich or Granovskaia this week
    • Manager sees ‘problem of determination in both boxes’

    Maurizio Sarri has had no contact with the Chelsea hierarchy this week and has claimed the ferocious debate around his preferred tactical approach is “a false problem” as he desperately clings to his position at Stamford Bridge.

    Related: Is defending making a comeback after the gung-ho attacking years?

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    Russia may be forced to aim weapons at Washington, suggests Putin

    Russia may be forced to aim weapons at Washington, suggests Putin


    ‘Centres of decision making’ will be targeted if west deploys new missiles in EuropeVladimir Putin has said that Russia will develop new weapons and aim them at western “centres of decision-making” if the west deploys new short and medium-range...

    ‘Centres of decision making’ will be targeted if west deploys new missiles in Europe

    Vladimir Putin has said that Russia will develop new weapons and aim them at western “centres of decision-making” if the west deploys new short and medium-range missiles in Europe.

    The threat, which appears to describe Washington and other western capitals, came after the United States and then Russia suspended compliance with the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty.

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    Romance novelist Cristiane Serruya accused of plagiarism

    Romance novelist Cristiane Serruya accused of plagiarism


    Brazilian author blames ghostwriter after fellow novelists, including bestseller Courtney Milan, flag passages they claim were lifted from their work verbatimBestselling Brazilian romance novelist Cristiane Serruya has pulled one of her novels from sale...

    Brazilian author blames ghostwriter after fellow novelists, including bestseller Courtney Milan, flag passages they claim were lifted from their work verbatim

    Bestselling Brazilian romance novelist Cristiane Serruya has pulled one of her novels from sale after she was accused of plagiarising some of the biggest authors in the genre.

    American author Courtney Milan, whose books are regulars on the New York Times and USA Today bestseller charts, said she was first alerted to the alleged plagiarism by a reader. A law professor turned historical romance author, Milan alleges that Serruya’s novel Royal Love “copied, word-for-word, multiple passages from my book The Duchess War”, laying out a range of instances on her blog.

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    'Surprisingly calm' Irish lottery winner lands £152m

    'Surprisingly calm' Irish lottery winner lands £152m


    Locals say country’s biggest EuroMillions jackpot ‘couldn’t have happened to nicer people’The winner of a €175m (£152m) EuroMillions jackpot who phoned Ireland’s national lottery to claim the prize was described as “very together” and...

    Locals say country’s biggest EuroMillions jackpot ‘couldn’t have happened to nicer people’

    The winner of a €175m (£152m) EuroMillions jackpot who phoned Ireland’s national lottery to claim the prize was described as “very together” and “surprisingly calm”.

    News was spreading on Wednesday of the country’s biggest-ever jackpot.

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    Don’t stop at The Departed’s rat: six other movie scenes that should be cut

    Don’t stop at The Departed’s rat: six other movie scenes that should be cut


    The car visible in the background in Braveheart? Kevin Spacey in Baby Driver? The money must be raised via Kickstarter to excise these and other crimes against film-makingThe Departed is Martin Scorsese’s financially most successful film, and the only...

    The car visible in the background in Braveheart? Kevin Spacey in Baby Driver? The money must be raised via Kickstarter to excise these and other crimes against film-making

    The Departed is Martin Scorsese’s financially most successful film, and the only one to earn him a best director Oscar. And yet, thanks to its final shot, it might also his most divisive. Fans have long decried the fact that a movie in which police officers and criminals rat on each other ends with a ham-fisted shot of a real rat scurrying across a railing.

    Now they are doing something about it; a Kickstarter campaign has been launched to digitally erase the rat from The Departed, permanently undoing cinema’s most heavy-handed metaphor. This feels like the start of a movement; no longer is the power to retcon beloved films confined to the likes of George Lucas and JK Rowling. Someone, please, initiate Kickstarters to erase these other movie missteps:

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    Capernaum review – lost boy rages at an unjust world

    Capernaum review – lost boy rages at an unjust world


    In Nadine Labaki’s powerful drama, a Beirut child sues his parents for giving birth to him – before ending up on the street caring for a stranger’s babySince its premiere at Cannes last May, this heart-wrenching movie from Lebanese director Nadine...

    In Nadine Labaki’s powerful drama, a Beirut child sues his parents for giving birth to him – before ending up on the street caring for a stranger’s baby

    Since its premiere at Cannes last May, this heart-wrenching movie from Lebanese director Nadine Labaki has won prizes and golden opinions and is a nominee for best foreign language film at this weekend’s Oscars. It is the story of a Beirut street kid who has run away from his unhappy, abusive home; he is befriended by an Ethiopian woman working as a cleaner without legal papers and gets to stay with her in return for minding her baby while she is out at work. But when she is picked up by police, he has to head off back to the streets, taking the baby with him – and is confronted by some terrible choices.

    Related: Nadine Labaki: ‘I really believe cinema can effect social change’

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    Covington Catholic student sues the Washington Post for defamation

    Covington Catholic student sues the Washington Post for defamation


    Nicholas Sandmann claims the newspaper falsely accused him of racist acts and instigating a confrontationA high school student from Covington, Kentucky, has sued the Washington Post for defamation, claiming the newspaper falsely accused him of racist...

    Nicholas Sandmann claims the newspaper falsely accused him of racist acts and instigating a confrontation

    A high school student from Covington, Kentucky, has sued the Washington Post for defamation, claiming the newspaper falsely accused him of racist acts and instigating a confrontation with a Native American activist in a January videotaped incident at the Lincoln Memorial.

    Related: 'I wasn't smirking': Kentucky student defends position with Native American

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    Why the future of the World Club Challenge must be secured

    Why the future of the World Club Challenge must be secured


    Sunday night was a big success. The Super League and NRL should be working together to ensure this contest lives on By Gavin Willacy for No Helmets RequiredAnyone doubting the status of the World Club Challenge should have seen the evidence in Wigan on...

    Sunday night was a big success. The Super League and NRL should be working together to ensure this contest lives on

    By Gavin Willacy for No Helmets Required

    Anyone doubting the status of the World Club Challenge should have seen the evidence in Wigan on Sunday evening. Giant flags, a serious burst of fireworks, and the NRL and Super League trophies greeted the players as they walked out at the DW Stadium. Amid all the ceremony, it felt as if there were more people on the pitch before kick-off than have been in the stands at some League One games this season. Wigan’s hotels were full and there were even tinkers selling half-and-half scarves outside, for goodness’ sake.

    Yet after an interminable wait to collect their medals from Martin Offiah – looking like Cluedo’s Reverend Green in an extraordinary outfit - the victorious Roosters players seemed faintly embarrassed to be on stage after a ‘trial game’, looking at the strategically-placed bottles as if to say, “Champers, after that - really?”. But their achievement sunk in and they were still in their dressing room celebrating 80 minutes after the final hooter.

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    Israel to launch first privately funded moon mission

    Israel to launch first privately funded moon mission


    Attempt to become fourth country to send spacecraft to the surface blasts off this week A team of Israeli scientists is to launch what will be the first privately funded mission to land on the moon this week, sending a spacecraft to collect data from the...

    Attempt to become fourth country to send spacecraft to the surface blasts off this week

    A team of Israeli scientists is to launch what will be the first privately funded mission to land on the moon this week, sending a spacecraft to collect data from the lunar surface.

    Named Beresheet, the Hebrew word for Genesis, the 585kg (1,290lb) robotic lander will blast off from Florida at 01.45 GMT on Friday, propelled by one of Elon Musk’s SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets. Once it touches down, in several weeks, it will measure the magnetic field of the moon to help understand how it formed.

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    Emma Thompson quits film after John Lasseter joins production

    Emma Thompson quits film after John Lasseter joins production


    The actor had been due to voice a role in Luck but left the film after Skydance controversially hired the former Pixar chief who has been accused of sexual harassment Emma Thompson has pulled out of a role in a large-scale animated film after former...

    The actor had been due to voice a role in Luck but left the film after Skydance controversially hired the former Pixar chief who has been accused of sexual harassment

    Emma Thompson has pulled out of a role in a large-scale animated film after former Pixar chief John Lasseter joined the production.

    Thompson had been due to voice a role in Luck, produced by Skydance Animation, but reportedly left the film after Skydance controversially hired Lasseter to head its animation division. Lasseter, who was chief creative officer of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios, took a leave of absence in 2017 after admitting to sexual conduct “missteps”, before leaving the company in 2018.

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    Harvey Weinstein breaks silence – to deny wanting Affleck to play Shakespeare

    Harvey Weinstein breaks silence – to deny wanting Affleck to play Shakespeare


    Disgraced movie mogul issues a rare public statement to reject Gwyneth Paltrow’s assertion he wanted her then-boyfriend to co-star in 1999’s Shakespeare in LoveHarvey Weinstein, the movie producer who was arrested on charges of rape last May is...

    Disgraced movie mogul issues a rare public statement to reject Gwyneth Paltrow’s assertion he wanted her then-boyfriend to co-star in 1999’s Shakespeare in Love

    Harvey Weinstein, the movie producer who was arrested on charges of rape last May is currently on bail, has issued a rare statement rebuffing a detail in a lengthy profile of Gwyneth Paltrow.

    In the Variety interview, Paltrow recalls working with Weinstein over the years, including on the multi-Oscar-winning Shakespeare in Love, which triumphed at the Academy Awards 20 years ago. Just before shooting began, Paltrow says, “Harvey wanted Ben Affleck to take over and play Shakespeare. I said, ‘No, you can’t do that. You have to have an English person.’”

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    Bernie Sanders raises $4m in 12 hours after announcing 2020 campaign

    Bernie Sanders raises $4m in 12 hours after announcing 2020 campaign


    Haul from 150,000 donors was more than double the $1.5m Kamala Harris raised in the first 24 hours of her campaignThe full list of Democrats vying to take on TrumpBernie Sanders raised $4m from 150,000 donors in all 50 states in the 12 hours after...

    Haul from 150,000 donors was more than double the $1.5m Kamala Harris raised in the first 24 hours of her campaign

    The full list of Democrats vying to take on Trump

    Bernie Sanders raised $4m from 150,000 donors in all 50 states in the 12 hours after announcing he had entered the 2020 race for the White House on Tuesday, according to his campaign.

    Related: Bernie Sanders announces run for presidency in 2020: 'We're gonna win'

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    Britons may need £52 visa to visit mainland Europe after Brexit

    Britons may need £52 visa to visit mainland Europe after Brexit


    Visa-free travel plan derailed again by Spanish demands over status of GibraltarBritish tourists travelling to continental Europe may need to pay £52 for a visa in a few weeks after Spanish demands over the status of Gibraltar again derailed Brussels’...

    Visa-free travel plan derailed again by Spanish demands over status of Gibraltar

    British tourists travelling to continental Europe may need to pay £52 for a visa in a few weeks after Spanish demands over the status of Gibraltar again derailed Brussels’ preparations for Brexit.

    Agreement on legislation exempting UK nationals from requiring the travel permit is mired in a dispute over whether the British overseas territory should be described as a “colony” in the EU’s statute book.

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    'An ad for blackness': how Soul Train made America do the Hustle

    'An ad for blackness': how Soul Train made America do the Hustle


    It was the ultra-hip music show that put black culture centre stage – with the enigmatic Don Cornelius as its impresario It was Aretha Franklin who made Don Cornelius realise he had hit the big time. Just two years earlier, the impresario’s show Soul...

    It was the ultra-hip music show that put black culture centre stage – with the enigmatic Don Cornelius as its impresario

    It was Aretha Franklin who made Don Cornelius realise he had hit the big time. Just two years earlier, the impresario’s show Soul Train had been a Chicago thing, broadcasting local talent to local viewers. Now it was a national sensation and even the choosiest stars wanted to get on board. Franklin told him: “My kids love the show and I want to be a part of it.” Stevie Wonder improvised an ode to Soul Train. James Brown, convinced that somebody, probably a white somebody, must be behind such a slick operation, looked around its Los Angeles studio and kept asking Cornelius: “Brother, who’s backing you on this?” Each time Cornelius replied: “Well, James, it’s just me.”

    He wasn’t bragging. As the host (or “conductor”) of Soul Train from 1970 to 1993, Cornelius was an avatar of cool, with his glorious afro, wide-lapelled suits and avuncular baritone, signing off each episode with a funky benediction: “I’m Don Cornelius, and as always in parting, we wish you love, peace ... and soul!” Billed as “the hippest trip in America”, Soul Train didn’t just beam the latest sounds from black America into millions of homes, but – with amateur dancers who became as integral to the show as the performers – the fashions, hairstyles and dance moves too.

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    How to make perfect spätzle noodles | Felicity Cloake

    How to make perfect spätzle noodles | Felicity Cloake


    A Bavarian noodle that’s quicker and easier to make than pasta – this is quintessential winter food, and a recipe you’ll make for life Everyone loves a nice noodle, and these stubby egg twists from Swabia, on Germany’s south-western border,...

    A Bavarian noodle that’s quicker and easier to make than pasta – this is quintessential winter food, and a recipe you’ll make for life

    Everyone loves a nice noodle, and these stubby egg twists from Swabia, on Germany’s south-western border, deserve to be better known here, if only our knowledge of the country’s cuisine didn’t start and end with the Black Forest gateau. Variations on the theme are eaten in neighbouring Austria, Hungary, Switzerland, eastern France and even the mountainous Italian province of South Tyrol, but only Swabian spätzle have been recognised by the EU with a Protected Geographical Indication for their quality.

    Stuttgart-born Steffi of the Ginger & Bread blog writes that “spätzle are to the cuisine of my region what rice is to Indian food or chips to Britain: there is hardly a dish that cannot be served, enhanced or transformed with a generous helping of these delicate little noodles”. Drenched in gravy or tossed with greens, they’re deliciously versatile, and considerably quicker and easier to make than Italian pasta or hand-pulled lo mien. In short, this is one recipe guaranteed to improve your life.

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    Joe Marler has no regrets over England absence despite pull of Wales tussle

    Joe Marler has no regrets over England absence despite pull of Wales tussle


    • Prop has had no call from Eddie Jones despite Vunipola injury• Marler happy out of England fray but Wales is ‘incredible’ gameJoe Marler has admitted he would love to be playing for England against Wales on Saturday but insists he has no...

    • Prop has had no call from Eddie Jones despite Vunipola injury
    • Marler happy out of England fray but Wales is ‘incredible’ game

    Joe Marler has admitted he would love to be playing for England against Wales on Saturday but insists he has no regrets over his international retirement despite Mako Vunipola’s injury-enforced absence.

    England head to Cardiff light on experience at loosehead prop after Vunipola was ruled out for the rest of the Six Nations with an ankle injury, leaving Eddie Jones to choose between Ben Moon and Ellis Genge, who have five Test starts between them. Marler revealed Jones has not been in contact about coming out of retirement and, while he did not completely close the door on doing so in the future, he said adding to his 59 England caps was “highly unlikely”. He did concede that England versus Wales was his favourite fixture to play in because of the hostility of the Welsh supporters.

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    Javid’s decision on Shamima Begum demeans his office | Sonia Sodha

    Javid’s decision on Shamima Begum demeans his office | Sonia Sodha


    The home secretary’s political ambitions are shamefully exposed by this playing to the galleryPolitics has always, to some extent, been the art of combining doing what’s right with doing what’s in one’s own political interests. It would be naive...

    The home secretary’s political ambitions are shamefully exposed by this playing to the gallery

    Politics has always, to some extent, been the art of combining doing what’s right with doing what’s in one’s own political interests. It would be naive to pretend otherwise. But in recent months – with a weak prime minister desperately trying to cling on to power, and senior Tories hungrily eyeing the top job – it feels like naked political ambition is shaping real-world outcomes more than ever before.

    Nowhere is that more evident than in Sajid Javid’s decision to revoke Shamima Begum’s British citizenship. In trying to position himself as Theresa May’s successor, the home secretary is signalling to the tabloid press just how tough he is on national security and immigration. Perhaps, as a son of immigrants, he feels he has more to prove.

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    French senators say Macron aide should be prosecuted for perjury

    French senators say Macron aide should be prosecuted for perjury


    Senate president to decide whether to file complaint against Alexandre Benalla after investigation A French senate committee has recommended prosecuting Alexandre Benalla, the former security aide of the French president, Emmanuel Macron, for perjury...

    Senate president to decide whether to file complaint against Alexandre Benalla after investigation

    A French senate committee has recommended prosecuting Alexandre Benalla, the former security aide of the French president, Emmanuel Macron, for perjury following a seven-month investigation into Benalla’s violent conduct during a street protest.

    Benalla was caught on video last year beating a May Day protester while wearing a police armband. Macron and his senior aides faced widespread criticism for being slow to come clean on the facts, prompting allegations of a cover-up.

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    The clitoris is a gift, so why is there an ingrained fear of talking about it? | Lucy McCormick

    The clitoris is a gift, so why is there an ingrained fear of talking about it? | Lucy McCormick


    If we want to make progress with FGM, we need to first tackle our outdated, misogynistic views on sexThe first UK conviction for female genital mutilation (FGM) this month was a milestone in the fight for the basic human rights of women and girls. But...

    If we want to make progress with FGM, we need to first tackle our outdated, misogynistic views on sex

    The first UK conviction for female genital mutilation (FGM) this month was a milestone in the fight for the basic human rights of women and girls. But one of the things that stands out from the news reports of that case is how oddly furtive they were about communicating the key facts – in particular their avoidance of the C-word: clitoris.

    In reporting such a prominent case, are readers unable to be shown the correct medical terminology? Why do the media carefully avoid mentioning what occurred, using highly generalised anatomical terms before quickly moving on? If this lack of detail was to spare the victim the indignity of having such a personal matter discussed so publicly, I would have sympathy, however I do not think that this is the case here. What I think is at play, is a deep-rooted fear of the clitoris.

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    Faroe Islands: closed for repairs but open about self-promotion

    Faroe Islands: closed for repairs but open about self-promotion


    The Faroes will be closed to tourists – except 100 volunteers – for a weekend in April as part of a campaign to promote tourism and sustainabilityIn parts of the Faroe Islands it rains 300 days a year, a national dish is wind-dried fermented mutton...

    The Faroes will be closed to tourists – except 100 volunteers – for a weekend in April as part of a campaign to promote tourism and sustainability

    In parts of the Faroe Islands it rains 300 days a year, a national dish is wind-dried fermented mutton and the population of 50,000 people is outnumbered by sheep. Transforming this archipelago between Shetland and Iceland into a mainstream tourism destination was never going to be easy. However, the Faroese pride themselves on inventiveness and practicality, qualities that have seen tourist numbers increasing 10% a year over the past five years. In part, it’s down to the work of Guðrið Hojgaard, director of the island’s tourist board, who has been selected by Politico as one of the 28 people most likely to “shape the world in 2019”.

    Hojgaard is behind the idea that the Faroes “will be closed from 26-28 April”, except for the 100 tourist volunteers who will be given free board and lodging in return for helping with practical projects to improve facilities for the 60,000 visitors who now choose the Faroe Islands for a holiday. The idea (more information at preservefaroeislands.com) is that tourists and locals collaborate on marking paths, creating signs and improving access to beauty spots that have become a success on Instagram. Lord of the Rings-style mountains, cute puffins and shaggy, shaggy sheep that come in dozens of different shades have made this a favourite destination for social media influencers. They fall for its quaintness: turf-roofed houses, dramatic waterfalls and misty Avalon-style landscapes.

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    I witnessed the purgatory of people trapped in Syria's Rukban camp | Marwa Awad

    I witnessed the purgatory of people trapped in Syria's Rukban camp | Marwa Awad


    Constant hunger and thirst haunt those stranded in the desert, where escape means paying vast sums to smugglersBetween the southern border of Syria, Jordan and Iraq lies a stretch of land akin to purgatory. More than 40,000 people are stranded in Rukban,...

    Constant hunger and thirst haunt those stranded in the desert, where escape means paying vast sums to smugglers

    Between the southern border of Syria, Jordan and Iraq lies a stretch of land akin to purgatory. More than 40,000 people are stranded in Rukban, almost 300km from Damascus.

    Families here are cut off from the world, facing hunger and lacking healthcare, transport and education.

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    Glass houses: how much privacy can city-dwellers expect?

    Glass houses: how much privacy can city-dwellers expect?


    The recent court decision against the neighbours of Tate Modern in London belies a much wider problem – everyone is constantly being watchedAlexander McFadyen says that he and his family were “more or less constantly watched” while they were at...

    The recent court decision against the neighbours of Tate Modern in London belies a much wider problem – everyone is constantly being watched

    Alexander McFadyen says that he and his family were “more or less constantly watched” while they were at home. They had to be “properly dressed” at all times, and even then they were often photographed or filmed, and sometimes spied on with binoculars. McFadyen set out to measure the problem. While working at the dining table, he counted 84 people taking photographs in 90 minutes. This is the reality of living in a glass-walled flat in Block C of Neo Bankside, just 34 metres from the viewing gallery at Tate Modern, which receives up to 600,000 visitors a year.

    A neighbour, Claire Fearn, said being watched like that made her “sick to her stomach”. People waved and made obscene gestures at her and her family. Her husband, Giles Fearn, found pictures of their home posted online by strangers. Many of the images are still on Twitter, often with amused remarks about the misfortune of their wealthy owners. (The flats are worth an average of £4.35m each.) Another neighbour, Lindsay Urquhart, visited the viewing gallery and heard someone remark that she and the other residents of Block C deserved to lose their privacy because they were “rich bastards”.

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    Nine executed in Egypt over Hisham Barakat assassination

    Nine executed in Egypt over Hisham Barakat assassination


    Human rights campaigners say 15 people executed recently were subjected to torture and unjust trialsEgypt executed nine men accused of killing the country’s former top prosecutor on Wednesday, bringing the total of those executed in the country to 15...

    Human rights campaigners say 15 people executed recently were subjected to torture and unjust trials

    Egypt executed nine men accused of killing the country’s former top prosecutor on Wednesday, bringing the total of those executed in the country to 15 in less than three weeks.

    The men were among 28 sentenced to death for the murder of Hisham Barakat, Egypt’s former public prosecutor, who was assassinated when a car bomb struck his vehicle in 2015.

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    Why vote for Sanders when you can have Elizabeth Warren instead? | Moira Donegan

    Why vote for Sanders when you can have Elizabeth Warren instead? | Moira Donegan


    Progressives don’t have to choose between macho socialism and corporate feminism. Elizabeth Warren offers a third waySenator Bernie Sanders announced his 2020 presidential run on Tuesday, reigniting old divisions within the Democratic party. His...

    Progressives don’t have to choose between macho socialism and corporate feminism. Elizabeth Warren offers a third way

    Senator Bernie Sanders announced his 2020 presidential run on Tuesday, reigniting old divisions within the Democratic party. His candidacy raises questions about the continued viability of the leftist resurgence that was ushered in partially by his influence in the 2018 midterms, and has sparked fights, similar to those that sprung from Sanders’ last unsuccessful presidential bid in 2016, over whether the Democratic base should commit itself to ameliorating economic inequality, or to fighting racist and sexist bigotry. Leftist feminists and racial justice advocates can be forgiven for already feeling very tired. It’s all just a little too familiar.

    Related: Who's running in 2020? The full list of Democrats vying to take on Trump

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    To catch a cactus thief: national parks fight a thorny problem

    To catch a cactus thief: national parks fight a thorny problem


    Hipster tastes have fueled a spike in succulent poaching. Now conservationists are finding creative ways to rescue themWhen most people drive through the Cactus Forest in Saguaro national park, their gazes are fixed skyward. Towering saguaros fill the...

    Hipster tastes have fueled a spike in succulent poaching. Now conservationists are finding creative ways to rescue them

    When most people drive through the Cactus Forest in Saguaro national park, their gazes are fixed skyward. Towering saguaros fill the view on either side of the road, rising 40, even 60ft high, their human-like arms outstretched.

    But on a recent December afternoon, Ray O’Neil was focused on the ground. He was looking for holes. As the park’s chief ranger, O’Neil is on constant alert for an unusual menace: cactus poachers. Saguaros aren’t just beautiful to look at; they also fetch a hefty price, up to $100 a foot, on the black market, where they are enormously popular with landscapers.

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    Roger Federer confirms clay court comeback at Madrid Open

    Roger Federer confirms clay court comeback at Madrid Open


    • Swiss player has not played on clay for two years• Federer will be in the draw for tournament in MayRoger Federer confirmed his participation for this year’s Madrid Open on Wednesday, marking his return to the European clay court season after two...

    • Swiss player has not played on clay for two years
    • Federer will be in the draw for tournament in May

    Roger Federer confirmed his participation for this year’s Madrid Open on Wednesday, marking his return to the European clay court season after two years away.

    The 20-times grand slam title winner has not played this year since his defeat by Stefanos Tsitsipas in the Australian Open round of 16 in January. Federer, whose sole French Open title came in 2009, has preferred to skip the European clay season over the past two seasons to manage his schedule.

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    Is defending making a comeback after the gung-ho attacking years?

    Is defending making a comeback after the gung-ho attacking years?


    Liverpool’s draw with Bayern followed a Champions League last-16 pattern so far – and the phenomenon runs deeperIt’s early days yet, of course. Nobody should be getting carried away. There’s plenty of time for the second legs or subsequent rounds...

    Liverpool’s draw with Bayern followed a Champions League last-16 pattern so far – and the phenomenon runs deeper

    It’s early days yet, of course. Nobody should be getting carried away. There’s plenty of time for the second legs or subsequent rounds to make a mockery of the thought but, after a few years in which the big clubs have treated caution as something laughably old-fashioned, a quaint affectation like a waxed moustache or a pocket-watch, might defending be making a comeback?

    There were no goals in Tuesday’s two Champions League ties. Nobody has yet scored a goal in the first half of a Champions League knockout tie this season. Goals per game in the last 16 (with all the obvious caveats about sample size) are at less than two as opposed to 5.0 in the knockout phase last season. It’s as though the collective thought has gone round that after last season’s chaos of three-goal comebacks and nearly comebacks, getting the defence right is where teams can gain an edge.

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    Despite the slaughter in Yemen, Britain is still chasing arms sales | Andrew Smith

    Despite the slaughter in Yemen, Britain is still chasing arms sales | Andrew Smith


    Defence contractors are in Abu Dhabi this week for the Middle East’s biggest arms fair – supported to the hilt by UK ministersA Khaleeji bagpipe band, a colourful aircraft display, a performance by the Armenian Military Orchestra and a big show of...

    Defence contractors are in Abu Dhabi this week for the Middle East’s biggest arms fair – supported to the hilt by UK ministers

    A Khaleeji bagpipe band, a colourful aircraft display, a performance by the Armenian Military Orchestra and a big show of support from the Emirate royal families. These were some of the touches at Sunday’s opening ceremony for the International Defence Exhibition and Conference (Idex 2019) in Abu Dhabi, the Middle East’s biggest arms fair.

    It’s a decadent and distasteful celebration of militarism and weaponry. Missiles, rifles, tanks, helicopters and warships are on display for anyone that can afford them. More than 100,000 people will attend this week, including representatives from all of the world’s biggest arms companies and military delegates from 57 nations. Among those looking to do business is the UK government, which has sent a team of civil servants to support UK arms company reps in doing as much business as possible. Particularly with the uncertainty of Brexit on the horizon, they will pull out all stops to cement sales.

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    #MeToo daubed on kissing sailor statue day after serviceman's death

    #MeToo daubed on kissing sailor statue day after serviceman's death


    Florida sculpture of George Mendonsa and Greta Zimmer Friedman defaced as kiss comes under scrutinyA statue in Florida depicting the US sailor famously photographed kissing a female stranger at the end of the second world war has been vandalised, with...

    Florida sculpture of George Mendonsa and Greta Zimmer Friedman defaced as kiss comes under scrutiny

    A statue in Florida depicting the US sailor famously photographed kissing a female stranger at the end of the second world war has been vandalised, with “#MeToo” written in red spray paint across the woman’s leg the day after the serviceman’s death.

    Although the image of George Mendonsa kissing Greta Zimmer Friedman has long been heralded for epitomising the joy shared throughout the world upon the ending of hostilities in 1945, it has come under scrutiny more recently, with many accusing Mendonsa of assault.

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    Shamima Begum 'a bit shocked' that UK has revoked citizenship

    Shamima Begum 'a bit shocked' that UK has revoked citizenship


    Teenager who travelled from London to Syria to join Isis says decision is ‘kind of heart-breaking’Shamima Begum, the teenager who travelled from east London to Syria to join Islamic State in 2015, has described Home Office plans to strip her of...

    Teenager who travelled from London to Syria to join Isis says decision is ‘kind of heart-breaking’

    Shamima Begum, the teenager who travelled from east London to Syria to join Islamic State in 2015, has described Home Office plans to strip her of citizenship as “kind of heart-breaking”.

    Related: Shamima Begum: will the plan to revoke her citizenship succeed?

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    Why BlacKkKlansman should win the best picture Oscar

    Why BlacKkKlansman should win the best picture Oscar


    Spike Lee’s politically charged cinema has irked the Academy in the past, but his witty take on how a black policeman outsmarted the Ku Klux Klan could prove sweetly timed“Today’s young generation, they don’t know anything,” says Spike Lee in...

    Spike Lee’s politically charged cinema has irked the Academy in the past, but his witty take on how a black policeman outsmarted the Ku Klux Klan could prove sweetly timed

    “Today’s young generation, they don’t know anything,” says Spike Lee in the Oscar-winning Rumble in the Jungle documentary, When We Were Kings. “Something happened last year, they know nothing about it. There are these great, great stories. These great historic events. I’m not talking about 1850s stuff. They don’t know who Malcolm X is. They don’t know who JFK is. They don’t know Muhammad Ali or Jackie Robinson. You can go down the line. It’s scary.”

    You could interpret Lee’s career, in part, as an exercise in filling those holes in America’s collective memory. Malcolm X is probably the most famous example, with his 1992 film reigniting a debate about the black political leader and his legacy. His documentary 4 Little Girls told the story of the Birmingham church bombing with its eerie parallels to the Charleston church shooting. But even She Hate Me – ostensibly an ethically questionable film about sperm donation – had a section dedicated to the story of Frank Wills, the security guard who raised the alarm about the Watergate break-in, struggled to find work after (he believed he was blacklisted) and who died in extreme poverty in 2000 at the age of 52.

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    García, Kuchar and Holmes: three golfers out of touch with reality | Ewan Murray

    García, Kuchar and Holmes: three golfers out of touch with reality | Ewan Murray


    Spaniard’s petulance, Kuchar’s thrifty touch and Holmes’s slow play sit uneasily with the public but Tiger Woods offers hopeThe World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship is an unlikely saviour for the sport. At the first staging of this...

    Spaniard’s petulance, Kuchar’s thrifty touch and Holmes’s slow play sit uneasily with the public but Tiger Woods offers hope

    The World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship is an unlikely saviour for the sport. At the first staging of this tournament, in 2017, players and caddies were affected by sickness to such an extent that an emergency ward by the 18th green would have been a valid addition. The impact on last year was inevitable; Rory McIlroy gave the event a miss despite a $10m prize pot, as again did Jason Day. The tournament seen by many as a beacon of light, having prised WGC status away from the Donald Trump-owned Doral site in Miami, was floundering.

    Related: Fifty seconds for a one-foot putt: Is slow play killing golf?

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    Roger Waters condemns Richard Branson's Venezuela aid concert

    Roger Waters condemns Richard Branson's Venezuela aid concert


    Virgin says event ‘is not a political statement and the US is not involved’The Pink Floyd co-founder Roger Waters has criticised an upcoming Live Aid-style concert to raise funds for humanitarian aid for Venezuela, by claiming it is a US-backed...

    Virgin says event ‘is not a political statement and the US is not involved’

    The Pink Floyd co-founder Roger Waters has criticised an upcoming Live Aid-style concert to raise funds for humanitarian aid for Venezuela, by claiming it is a US-backed effort to tarnish the socialist government.

    Related: Maduro government and Richard Branson to hold rival Venezuela concerts

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    Why readers are critical for the future of Guardian journalism

    Why readers are critical for the future of Guardian journalism


    By opting for a reader-funded business model, we rely on readers to support our groundbreaking independent journalism. Our risk is paying off, but we still need your help Support our journalism by making a contribution or by subscribingIn the last year,...

    By opting for a reader-funded business model, we rely on readers to support our groundbreaking independent journalism. Our risk is paying off, but we still need your help

    Support our journalism by making a contribution or by subscribing

    In the last year, Guardian journalism has reached record numbers around the world and more than a million people have supported our work financially. This has resulted in our new model for open, independent journalism which is available to everyone and funded by our readers. It has been inspiring to see the positive response from so many of you, but our work is just beginning.

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    Jeremy Hunt urges Germany to rethink Saudi arms sales ban

    Jeremy Hunt urges Germany to rethink Saudi arms sales ban


    UK foreign secretary visits Berlin after raising concerns about impact of moratoriumJeremy Hunt, the British foreign secretary, will visit Berlin on Wednesday after urging Germany to exempt big defence projects from its efforts to halt arms sales to...

    UK foreign secretary visits Berlin after raising concerns about impact of moratorium

    Jeremy Hunt, the British foreign secretary, will visit Berlin on Wednesday after urging Germany to exempt big defence projects from its efforts to halt arms sales to Saudi Arabia, or face damage to both its economic and European credentials.

    Related: UK's arms export supervisor attacks NGOs over Yemen deaths

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    Green MEPs held after anti-nuclear protest at Belgian military base

    Green MEPs held after anti-nuclear protest at Belgian military base


    UK’s Molly Scott Cato among those held after action over stockpiling of US nuclear bombs Three Green MEPs – including one from the UK – have been arrested after breaking into a Belgian military airbase to protest against its stockpiling of American...

    UK’s Molly Scott Cato among those held after action over stockpiling of US nuclear bombs

    Three Green MEPs – including one from the UK – have been arrested after breaking into a Belgian military airbase to protest against its stockpiling of American B61 nuclear bombs.

    The MEPs – Molly Scott Cato, Michèle Rivasi and Tilly Metz – unfurled a banner on a runway for F-16 fighter jets at the Kleine Brogel base in the east of the country calling for a nuclear-free Europe, before being taken into custody.

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    South Korea nixes diversity rules after saying K-pop stars 'look identical'

    South Korea nixes diversity rules after saying K-pop stars 'look identical'


    Guidelines to address promotion of unrealistic beauty standards withdrawn in state censorship rowGovernment guidelines aimed at promoting more diversity in South Korea’s K-pop world have been withdrawn after critics said they amounted to state...

    Guidelines to address promotion of unrealistic beauty standards withdrawn in state censorship row

    Government guidelines aimed at promoting more diversity in South Korea’s K-pop world have been withdrawn after critics said they amounted to state censorship of a booming industry.

    The guidelines issued last week by the ministry of gender equality and family complained that K-pop stars looked too alike, saying “the problem of … uniformity among singers is serious”, and noting most idols were thin and wore identical makeup and skimpy outfits.

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    How to catch a catfisher

    How to catch a catfisher


    When Max Benwell found out someone was using his photos to approach women online, he decided to track down the trickster – setting up a fake Instagram account and changing his gender on Tinder along the way Continue...

    When Max Benwell found out someone was using his photos to approach women online, he decided to track down the trickster – setting up a fake Instagram account and changing his gender on Tinder along the way

    Continue reading...
    Smuggling art into fashion: Erwin Blumenfeld's high style – in pictures

    Smuggling art into fashion: Erwin Blumenfeld's high style – in pictures


    Erwin Blumenfeld was one of the most celebrated fashion photographers of his time. He mostly worked in black and white, but this selection focuses on his colour output and boldly experimental images made in New York in the 40s and 50s Continue...

    Erwin Blumenfeld was one of the most celebrated fashion photographers of his time. He mostly worked in black and white, but this selection focuses on his colour output and boldly experimental images made in New York in the 40s and 50s

    Continue reading...
    'I'm panicking': Seoul prepares to rip out its manufacturing heart

    'I'm panicking': Seoul prepares to rip out its manufacturing heart


    The next 15 megacities #15: The fast-growing South Korean capital is about to wipe out Euljiro, a neighbourhood home to 10,000 shops and 50,000 tradespeople that was integral to the country’s postwar boomFrom the main street, the Euljiro neighbourhood...

    The next 15 megacities #15: The fast-growing South Korean capital is about to wipe out Euljiro, a neighbourhood home to 10,000 shops and 50,000 tradespeople that was integral to the country’s postwar boom

    From the main street, the Euljiro neighbourhood doesn’t look like much: some shabby retail stores, cold-noodle restaurants, a Starbucks.

    Enter one of the small alleys, however, and you’ll find yourself in a kind of manufacturing anthill: thousands upon thousands of shops, each crammed to the rafters with bolts, circuit boards, iron castings, gauges, wires, lights, switches, tools and innumerable tiny objects that defy description.

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    New order: the best young designers to look out for this season

    New order: the best young designers to look out for this season


    What label has everyone talking with its inflatable toy-inspired clothes? And which designer is making pearls a thing for spring? This season, we have the answersRead more from the spring/summer 2019 edition of The Fashion, our biannual fashion...

    What label has everyone talking with its inflatable toy-inspired clothes? And which designer is making pearls a thing for spring? This season, we have the answers

    Read more from the spring/summer 2019 edition of The Fashion, our biannual fashion supplement

    Generally, when fashion editors are prepared to get wet to watch a show, buzz status is bestowed. This happened on the rainy roof of Seward Park high school on the Lower East Side last September, with New York-based Area, a brand on the radar of style magazines since it was founded in 2016. This collection saw it continue on a journey through pop culture. Set to the sensual melodies of Estonian soul artist Velly Joonas, remixed by the Late Night Tales collective, designers Piotrek Panszczyk and Beckett Fogg captivated the audience with a collection that felt fresh yet grounded, powerful yet playful. Inspired by little-known Czech artist Libuše Niklová, the pioneer of inflatable children’s toys in the 60s, it was sculptural, sexy and textured. “[Her] bold, graphics and colourful blown-up shapes started our journey in playing with volume and we began cutting our patterns to mimic inflation,” Panszczyk says, hence the “inflated folklore dolls reimagined in sheer organza with regal embellishments that evoke early 60s couture”. The beaded lattice overlays and boots with swinging beads – inspired by both Polish folk costumes and the mass-market trinket trade in China – created what the designers like to call “a modern clash of embellishment”. One worth waiting in the rain for. SC

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    'In pain all the time': will there ever be a cure for chronic, life-changing UTIs?

    'In pain all the time': will there ever be a cure for chronic, life-changing UTIs?


    Urinary tract infections are painful - but usually short lived. For thousands of women and children though, the problem can last years. Is relief in sight?Poppy was travelling the world when it began. It started in Malaysia and got worse in Australia....

    Urinary tract infections are painful - but usually short lived. For thousands of women and children though, the problem can last years. Is relief in sight?

    Poppy was travelling the world when it began. It started in Malaysia and got worse in Australia. The student had the infection for a few weeks before she saw a doctor and was given a quick hit of broad-spectrum antibiotics. They didn’t work.

    “I went on getting worse,” she says. “I was not in any city long enough to do a full culture and wait for the right antibiotics.”

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    David's mother killed his father, but he wants her freed – podcast

    David's mother killed his father, but he wants her freed – podcast


    In 2010 Sally Challen hit her husband Richard more than 20 times with a hammer, killing him. Her son David Challen explains why she did it. And: Lauren Gambino on why 16 states are suing Trump’s administrationNine years ago Sally Challen killed her...

    In 2010 Sally Challen hit her husband Richard more than 20 times with a hammer, killing him. Her son David Challen explains why she did it. And: Lauren Gambino on why 16 states are suing Trump’s administration

    Nine years ago Sally Challen killed her husband, Richard. She was found guilty of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment. In March 2018, she won leave to appeal against her conviction, on the grounds that she had suffered under “coercive and controlling behaviour” from her husband. This only became a criminal offence four years after her trial, under the 2015 Serious Crime Act. Later this month, the court will hear the appeal.

    India Rakusen talks to Sally Challen’s son David about why he is fighting for her to be freed. Rakusen also hears from Harriet Wistrich, her lawyer, who hopes to show that for 30 years, Richard’s behaviour pushed his wife to the brink. Last year, Wistrich successfully blocked the release of the “black-cab rapist” John Worboys.

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    'It was insensitive': Burberry apologises for 'noose' hoodie after model complains

    'It was insensitive': Burberry apologises for 'noose' hoodie after model complains


    Liz Kennedy said the design at London Fashion Week evoked lynchings and suicideThe chief executive and chief creative officer of luxury fashion brand Burberry have apologised for putting a hoodie with strings tied in the shape of a noose on its London...

    Liz Kennedy said the design at London Fashion Week evoked lynchings and suicide

    The chief executive and chief creative officer of luxury fashion brand Burberry have apologised for putting a hoodie with strings tied in the shape of a noose on its London Fashion Week runway.

    The knotted strings surfaced after Sunday’s show when a model complained both before the show and on Instagram, saying the noose not only evoked lynchings but also suicide.

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    The Snow Moon - in pictures

    The Snow Moon - in pictures


    The February Snow Moon is the biggest and brightest super-moon of the year, lighting up the night skies across the planet giving stargazers a celestial treat. It appears brighter and bigger than other full moons because it is close to its perigee, the...

    The February Snow Moon is the biggest and brightest super-moon of the year, lighting up the night skies across the planet giving stargazers a celestial treat. It appears brighter and bigger than other full moons because it is close to its perigee, the closest point in its orbit to Earth

    Continue reading...
    Venezuelan opposition plans delivery of aid from Colombia and Brazil

    Venezuelan opposition plans delivery of aid from Colombia and Brazil


    Juan Guaidó calls for volunteers to carry stockpiled US aid over the borders of two countries on SaturdayMembers of Venezuela’s opposition are gathering in Cúcuta, Colombia to shift stockpiled US aid to their homeland this weekend in defiance of...

    Juan Guaidó calls for volunteers to carry stockpiled US aid over the borders of two countries on Saturday

    Members of Venezuela’s opposition are gathering in Cúcuta, Colombia to shift stockpiled US aid to their homeland this weekend in defiance of their country’s embattled president Nicolás Maduro.

    “Saturday will be a day that goes down in our history,” said Omar Lares, the former mayor of Campo Elías in western Venezuela, who has been living in exile in the border city for two years and is now helping coordinate Saturday’s planned delivery of aid.

    Related: Maduro government and Richard Branson to hold rival Venezuela concerts

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    Trump might have a solid case for emergency declaration, analysts say

    Trump might have a solid case for emergency declaration, analysts say


    Though Trump himself suggested there is no real emergency, courts are unlikely to second-guess a president’s broad leewayMany legal analysts who watched Donald Trump declare a national emergency over immigration on Friday thought the president had weak...

    Though Trump himself suggested there is no real emergency, courts are unlikely to second-guess a president’s broad leeway

    Many legal analysts who watched Donald Trump declare a national emergency over immigration on Friday thought the president had weak legal grounds for doing so. In particular, many thought Trump hurt his own case by admitting, right there in the White House Rose Garden: “I didn’t need to do this, but I’d rather do it much faster.”

    “This quote should be the first sentence of the first paragraph of every complaint filed this afternoon,” tweeted George Conway, a top Washington lawyer and the husband of Trump aide Kellyanne Conway.

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    Kaiser Karl: 12 moments that made Lagerfeld a legend

    Kaiser Karl: 12 moments that made Lagerfeld a legend


    The late designer spent 65 years at the top of fashion, but he was equally known for his put-downs, his personal style and even his pets Continue...

    The late designer spent 65 years at the top of fashion, but he was equally known for his put-downs, his personal style and even his pets

    Continue reading...
    Ten ways to cut it as a wine bluff

    Ten ways to cut it as a wine bluff


    Looking for a shortcut to oenological enlightenment? Here are some hints for making a little knowledge – and some orbital shaking – go a long wayNever ruin your palate by drinking fine wine, they say: the last thing you want is to find that perfectly...

    Looking for a shortcut to oenological enlightenment? Here are some hints for making a little knowledge – and some orbital shaking – go a long way

    Never ruin your palate by drinking fine wine, they say: the last thing you want is to find that perfectly acceptable bottle of supermarket plonk turning sour in your mouth because you’ve supped too long at the altar of Gevrey-Chambertin.

    But talking the talk can still be pretty useful: there’s nothing like a smattering of well-chosen phrases about “botrytis” (mould, counter-intuitively, a good thing, also known as “noble rot”), “malolactic fermentation” and “ullage” to put the most irritating know-all in their place.

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    Karl Lagerfeld obituary

    Karl Lagerfeld obituary


    Fashion designer who oversaw the transformation of Chanel into an intercontinental superbrandThe designer Karl Lagerfeld, who has died aged 85, explored and exploited couture, ready-to-wear and even mass-market fashion for more than 60 years. He had a...

    Fashion designer who oversaw the transformation of Chanel into an intercontinental superbrand

    The designer Karl Lagerfeld, who has died aged 85, explored and exploited couture, ready-to-wear and even mass-market fashion for more than 60 years. He had a genius for visual quotation and allusion, impersonation and pastiche, especially at Chanel, the fashion house he headed for more than three decades, and it made him the first postmodern fashionmeister.

    Nobody else stayed on top of so many labels for so long: besides Chanel, Lagerfeld headed Fendi, and intermittently had his own-name brand. And he evolved into a commentary on the whole business: personally stylised into his own logo (glasses, gloves, the defensive composure for the camera); encyclopedic about the history of design, yet devoid of sentimental nostalgia. Edna E Mode, the opinionated couturier in the Pixar cartoon The Incredibles, says: “I never look back, darling, it distracts from the now.” Totally Lagerfeld.

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    Bernie Sanders 2020: where the presidential candidate stands on key issues – video profile

    Bernie Sanders 2020: where the presidential candidate stands on key issues – video profile


    Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont who ran against Hillary Clinton for the 2016 Democratic nomination, has announced his run for the presidency in 2020. Sanders, 77, running as a Democrat, will be up against a more crowded and diverse...

    Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont who ran against Hillary Clinton for the 2016 Democratic nomination, has announced his run for the presidency in 2020. Sanders, 77, running as a Democrat, will be up against a more crowded and diverse field this time round   

    Bernie Sanders announces run for presidency in 2020Continue reading...
    National Press Awards: Guardian and Observer receive 33 nominations

    National Press Awards: Guardian and Observer receive 33 nominations


    Windrush and Cambridge Analytica coverage recognised in several categoriesThe Guardian and the Observer have received 33 nominations at the National Press Awards, including multiple coverage of the Windrush and Cambridge Analytica scandals.The Guardian...

    Windrush and Cambridge Analytica coverage recognised in several categories

    The Guardian and the Observer have received 33 nominations at the National Press Awards, including multiple coverage of the Windrush and Cambridge Analytica scandals.

    The Guardian has been shortlisted for news website of the year, while both outlets are nominated for daily and Sunday newspaper of the year respectively.

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    Karl Lagerfeld: the Chanel years – in pictures

    Karl Lagerfeld: the Chanel years – in pictures


    The designer joined the fashion house in 1983, and remained for 36 years. Following his death, we revisit some of his most iconic shows and creations Continue...

    The designer joined the fashion house in 1983, and remained for 36 years. Following his death, we revisit some of his most iconic shows and creations

    Continue reading...
    Baked winter roots with feta and smoked garlic | Nigel Slater

    Baked winter roots with feta and smoked garlic | Nigel Slater


    A hearty salad of onion, swede and parsnip, roasted till slightly caramelised, with a smoky, salty dressingSet the oven at 200C/gas mark 6. Peel a couple of red onions, cut them in half and then into thick segments. Peel and thickly slice 600g of swede,...

    A hearty salad of onion, swede and parsnip, roasted till slightly caramelised, with a smoky, salty dressing

    Set the oven at 200C/gas mark 6. Peel a couple of red onions, cut them in half and then into thick segments. Peel and thickly slice 600g of swede, then cut each slice into pieces roughly 4cm long. Do the same with a couple of parsnips.

    Continue reading...
    Limos, mansions and millennials: how wealth transformed a quiet mountain

    Limos, mansions and millennials: how wealth transformed a quiet mountain


    Utah’s Powder Mountain has seen an influx of monied entrepreneurs, but longtime residents fear something special is being lost What bothers Dan Harris the most, he said, on a rickety chair on the porch of his 90-year-old, 800ft “cracker box farm...

    Utah’s Powder Mountain has seen an influx of monied entrepreneurs, but longtime residents fear something special is being lost

    What bothers Dan Harris the most, he said, on a rickety chair on the porch of his 90-year-old, 800ft “cracker box farm house”, is how the owners of the mountain across the street don’t seem to feel the same devotion to it that he does.

    As he described it, they have turned “a near-pristine” Utah mountain top where he hiked, hunted and skied as a youth into a landscape studded with holiday homes for high-profile business and media tycoons. “If you want a second vacation home, why use all those resources and space, all this potential wildlife habitat for a place you’re going to visit a couple of times a year?” he said. “It just seems kind of arrogant.”

    Continue reading...
    What happens when you put cowboys in a room to talk politics?

    What happens when you put cowboys in a room to talk politics?


    At the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Nevada, friends and performers with wide-ranging views met to discuss climate change, immigration and other concerns ‘without demonizing each other’Several weeks ahead of the 35th annual National Cowboy...

    At the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Nevada, friends and performers with wide-ranging views met to discuss climate change, immigration and other concerns ‘without demonizing each other’

    Several weeks ahead of the 35th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada, Gail Steiger, a rancher and singer-songwriter from Yavapai county, Arizona, emailed a proposal to a small host of close friends and fellow performers.

    “None of us fit easily in any box, but we all hold each other in high regard,” he wrote.

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    'Don't feed the monster!' The people who have stopped buying new clothes

    'Don't feed the monster!' The people who have stopped buying new clothes


    A growing movement eschews fast fashion in favour of secondhand clothing. Is this the biggest personal change that can be made for the environment?Lauren Cowdery is flicking through the rails of the Cancer Research charity shop in Goole, east Yorkshire....

    A growing movement eschews fast fashion in favour of secondhand clothing. Is this the biggest personal change that can be made for the environment?

    Lauren Cowdery is flicking through the rails of the Cancer Research charity shop in Goole, east Yorkshire. “Too bobbly!” she tuts at a ribbed top. “This skirt is big but it would be easy to take in … ” Cowdery appears to be shopping, but she is merely browsing. She is on a mission not to buy any new clothes, even ones that have recently belonged to someone else. “I think you have to pull back and ask: ‘Do I need this?’” she says.

    Cowdery is one of a growing number of people who love clothes but try their hardest to resist buying them for reasons of sustainability. According to the charity Wrap, which promotes sustainable waste management, the average lifetime for a garment in the UK is just 2.2 years. An estimated £30bn of unused clothing hangs in UK wardrobes, and yet still we shop for more. “Each week we buy 38m items and 11m items go to landfill,” says Maria Chenoweth, chief executive of Traid, a charity working to stop clothes being thrown away. “We don’t have enough resources to keep feeding this monster.”

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    Send me home: what should happen to the Isis wives? – podcast

    Send me home: what should happen to the Isis wives? – podcast


    Hoda Muthana, an American who joined Isis four years ago, now wants to return home. The Guardian’s Martin Chulov describes his time at al-Hawl refugee camp, where an estimated 1,500 foreign women and children are seeking safety. And: Polly Toynbee on...

    Hoda Muthana, an American who joined Isis four years ago, now wants to return home. The Guardian’s Martin Chulov describes his time at al-Hawl refugee camp, where an estimated 1,500 foreign women and children are seeking safety. And: Polly Toynbee on the split within the Labour party

    Last month, Hoda Muthana and her one-year-old son were captured by Kurdish forces after fleeing the last pocket of land controlled by Islamic State. American-born Muthana travelled to Syria to join the terror group in 2014, and was at one time one of Isis’s most prominent online agitators. Muthana has said she now deeply regrets the decision to go and wants to return to America.

    The Guardian’s Middle East editor, Martin Chulov, talks to India Rakusen about his time inside the sprawling camp of al-Hawl, where he interviewed Muthana. The camp, currently home to 39,000 refugees, is situated about two hours from Baghuz, where a final battle to oust extremists is days from being completed.

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    What a European education project can tell us about Brexit – podcast

    What a European education project can tell us about Brexit – podcast


    When the writer Peter Pomerantsev was a teenager, he was sent to a school that was part of the European Schools network, which counts Boris Johnson among its alumni. He discusses what the project can tell us about the EU. Plus: the Guardian’s UK...

    When the writer Peter Pomerantsev was a teenager, he was sent to a school that was part of the European Schools network, which counts Boris Johnson among its alumni. He discusses what the project can tell us about the EU. Plus: the Guardian’s UK technology editor, Alex Hern, on AI advancements

    The writer Peter Pomerantsev was 15 when his parents moved to Germany and enrolled him at the European School in Munich. The schools were set up in 1956 with the aim of educating the students to be “in mind Europeans, schooled and ready to complete and consolidate the work of their fathers before them, to bring into being a united and thriving Europe”. One of the architects of Brexit, Boris Johnson, attended one of the schools, in Brussels.

    Pomerantsev discusses with Anuskha Asthana his experiences at the school and what the project tells us about the EU. He wonders whether the school successfully promoted integration, or actually had the opposite effect.

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    The Breadmaker: on the frontline of Venezuela's bakery wars – video

    The Breadmaker: on the frontline of Venezuela's bakery wars – video


    In the midst of Venezuela’s spiralling economic crisis, Natalia and fellow members of a Chavista collective have stepped in to take over production at a local bakery, La Minka. Authorities had suspended operations when the owners were accused of...

    In the midst of Venezuela’s spiralling economic crisis, Natalia and fellow members of a Chavista collective have stepped in to take over production at a local bakery, La Minka. Authorities had suspended operations when the owners were accused of overpricing their loaves and hoarding flour. In March 2017, with the tacit support of the government, the collective began selling affordable bread. This is the story of their fight to safeguard the bakery’s future and keep the Chavista dream alive

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    Donald Trump v Beto O'Rourke: rival rallies on US border security – video report

    Donald Trump v Beto O'Rourke: rival rallies on US border security – video report


    Donald Trump and potential presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke held rallies in El Paso, Texas, on Monday night offering their contrasting views on Trump's US-Mexico border wall. The president addressed his crowd in front of a big US flag along with...

    Donald Trump and potential presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke held rallies in El Paso, Texas, on Monday night offering their contrasting views on Trump's US-Mexico border wall. The president addressed his crowd in front of a big US flag along with three 'finish the wall' banners. Meanwhile nearby, O'Rourke told supporters El Paso was, 'safe not because of walls but in spite of walls'.

    Trump and Beto O'Rourke speak at dueling rallies in TexasContinue reading...
    Graffiti and 'barbecued dogs': ​have​​ vegan ​protests​ gone too far​?​ – video

    Graffiti and 'barbecued dogs': ​have​​ vegan ​protests​ gone too far​?​ – video


    As a group of animal rights protesters roast a very realistic-looking fake dog on the streets of Sydney, butchers in France are attacked and campaigners in the UK hold noisy protests in supermarkets and restaurants, we look at whether vegan protests have...

    As a group of animal rights protesters roast a very realistic-looking fake dog on the streets of Sydney, butchers in France are attacked and campaigners in the UK hold noisy protests in supermarkets and restaurants, we look at whether vegan protests have become too extreme

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    Flat Earth rising: meet the people casting aside 2,500 years of science – video

    Flat Earth rising: meet the people casting aside 2,500 years of science – video


    Though not a new phenomenon, flat Earth theory has enjoyed a huge resurgence recently. A YouGov poll indicated that a third of Americans aged 18 to 24 were unsure of the shape of our planet, in spite of scientific proofs from Pythagoras to Nasa. Why has...

    Though not a new phenomenon, flat Earth theory has enjoyed a huge resurgence recently. A YouGov poll indicated that a third of Americans aged 18 to 24 were unsure of the shape of our planet, in spite of scientific proofs from Pythagoras to Nasa. Why has this happened now, and what does it tell us about society today?


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    Why is Venezuela in crisis? – video explainer

    Why is Venezuela in crisis? – video explainer


    Venezuelans have been in a state of uncertainty since Juan Guaidó, the leader of the democratically elected national assembly, declared himself the interim president in a move against the current leader, Nicolás Maduro. How did this once prosperous...

    Venezuelans have been in a state of uncertainty since Juan Guaidó, the leader of the democratically elected national assembly, declared himself the interim president in a move against the current leader, Nicolás Maduro. How did this once prosperous country descend into chaos? 

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    Orbán, my dad and me – video

    Orbán, my dad and me – video


    A Guardian film-maker and his father, who left communist Hungary for Britain in the 70s and now supports the nationalist prime minister, Viktor Orbán, take a road trip through the country in the hope of understanding each other and overcoming their...

    A Guardian film-maker and his father, who left communist Hungary for Britain in the 70s and now supports the nationalist prime minister, Viktor Orbán, take a road trip through the country in the hope of understanding each other and overcoming their differences

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    Guardian film Black Sheep nominated for best short documentary Oscar

    Guardian film Black Sheep nominated for best short documentary Oscar


    Ed Perkins’ film about a young black boy’s response to a racist gang after he moves out of London is up for an Academy awardOscars 2019: Roma and The Favourite vying for glory with 10 nominations eachFull list of nominations Black Sheep, a film...

    Ed Perkins’ film about a young black boy’s response to a racist gang after he moves out of London is up for an Academy award

    Oscars 2019: Roma and The Favourite vying for glory with 10 nominations each
    Full list of nominations

    Black Sheep, a film commissioned by the Guardian, has been nominated for best short documentary at the 2019 Oscars.

    Directed by Ed Perkins, Black Sheep tells the story of Cornelius Walker, a black 11-year-old from London who moves with his family to a housing estate in Essex after the murder of schoolboy Damilola Taylor in 2000. Walker, the same age as Taylor and of similar background, found himself confronting a gang of local racists and, after first fighting back, went to extraordinary lengths to fit in and gain their friendship.

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    Berta Cáceres case: a warning for those who would kill activists

    Berta Cáceres case: a warning for those who would kill activists


    Trial is notable for highlighting land and nature defender murders that ordinarily go unpunishedThe sentencing on Thursday of seven men accused of murdering the Honduran environmentalist Berta Cáceres is only partial justice, but it should inspire...

    Trial is notable for highlighting land and nature defender murders that ordinarily go unpunished

    The sentencing on Thursday of seven men accused of murdering the Honduran environmentalist Berta Cáceres is only partial justice, but it should inspire anyone committed to ending the slaughter of land and nature defenders around the globe.

    A court in Tegucigalpa handed down guilty verdicts on all but one of the eight accused, including two employees of the hydro-electric dam company that the indigenous Lenca woman had been campaigning against before her assassination on 2 March 2016.

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    Berta Cáceres murder trial plagued by allegations of cover-ups set to end

    Berta Cáceres murder trial plagued by allegations of cover-ups set to end


    Verdict against eight men accused in the murder of Honduran indigenous environmentalist will be handed down on ThursdayThe verdict against eight men accused over the murder of Honduran indigenous environmentalist Berta Cáceres will be handed down on...

    Verdict against eight men accused in the murder of Honduran indigenous environmentalist will be handed down on Thursday

    The verdict against eight men accused over the murder of Honduran indigenous environmentalist Berta Cáceres will be handed down on Thursday after a controversial five-week trial plagued by allegations of negligence and cover-ups.

    Cáceres – who won the 2015 Goldman Environmental Prize – was shot dead in March 2016, after a long battle against the internationally financed Agua Zarca hydroelectric dam project on the Gualcarque river, territory sacred to the indigenous Lenca people.

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    Civil rights 'under serious attack' across the globe

    Civil rights 'under serious attack' across the globe


    More than half of countries use censorship, harassment or violence to repress public debate, warns a reportNearly six in 10 countries are seriously restricting people’s freedoms, according to a new report that warns of a growing repression around the...

    More than half of countries use censorship, harassment or violence to repress public debate, warns a report

    Nearly six in 10 countries are seriously restricting people’s freedoms, according to a new report that warns of a growing repression around the world.

    According to the study, there is little or no space for activism in countries such as Eritrea and Syria, and also worrying signs in countries where democracy is considered well established, such as France, the US, Hungary and India.

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    South African community wins court battle over mining rights

    South African community wins court battle over mining rights


    High court orders government to get prior community consent before granting mining rights in PondolandEnvironmental activists in South Africa have won a landmark legal victory after the high court ordered the government to get prior community consent...

    High court orders government to get prior community consent before granting mining rights in Pondoland

    Environmental activists in South Africa have won a landmark legal victory after the high court ordered the government to get prior community consent before granting mining rights.

    The judgment represents a major victory for campaigners in Xolobeni, a community in Pondoland, who have been involved in a protracted and sometimes violent struggle against a proposed titanium mine.

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    Hunger, health and energy: can disruptive tech help solve global challenges?

    Hunger, health and energy: can disruptive tech help solve global challenges?


    Tech-savvy entrepreneurs may hold the key to reaching some of the 17 sustainable development goals. Here are three to watch Meeting the sustainable development goals (SDGs) – a global call to action to eradicate poverty, protect the Earth and promote...

    Tech-savvy entrepreneurs may hold the key to reaching some of the 17 sustainable development goals. Here are three to watch

    Meeting the sustainable development goals (SDGs) – a global call to action to eradicate poverty, protect the Earth and promote peace and prosperity – will not only require all hands on deck, but all tech on deck as well. The internet of things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI) are already playing a key role in tackling today’s immense environmental and social challenges, and adopting these technologies more broadly could help scale solutions in a way that once might have seemed impossible. Among the potential key players are three disruptive social enterprises, who spoke at the Business Call to Action’s recent annual forum in New York.

    Sevamob
    Sevamob is an Indian social enterprise that provides primary healthcare services at more than 100 locations in India, South Africa and Georgia, US. With its “pop-up” clinics, Sevamob could potentially reach millions of poor people in rural and other under-served communities. But what really sets it apart is its use of AI to detect various medical conditions – from vitamin deficiencies and minor skin infections, such as thrush, to serious diseases, such as glaucoma and malaria – on the spot.

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    From tranquil kingdom to busy exporter: will Bhutan find prosperity in hazelnuts?

    From tranquil kingdom to busy exporter: will Bhutan find prosperity in hazelnuts?


    Bhutan is opening up to foreign investment. Its first 100% foreign-owned company is tapping into global demand for hazelnuts, and bringing new sources of income to mountain communitiesThe tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan seems an unlikely place to...

    Bhutan is opening up to foreign investment. Its first 100% foreign-owned company is tapping into global demand for hazelnuts, and bringing new sources of income to mountain communities

    The tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan seems an unlikely place to associate with Nutella. It’s more likely to conjure up images of craggy mountaintop monasteries and strings of prayer flags, or the fact it measures national happiness rather than the conventional measure of a country’s prosperity, GDP.

    But that may all be about to change, as the first 100% foreign-owned company in Bhutan has spotted an opportunity for hazelnut production, the key ingredient in Nutella and Ferrero Rocher chocolates.

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    How WhatsApp and SMS are being used to save the lives of babies in Africa

    How WhatsApp and SMS are being used to save the lives of babies in Africa


    By providing vital maternity services via mobile phones, innovators such as Jacaranda Health are transforming childbirth survival rates in KenyaPregnancy should be an exciting time, but for some women in Kenya it can be a dangerous experience. Women in...

    By providing vital maternity services via mobile phones, innovators such as Jacaranda Health are transforming childbirth survival rates in Kenya

    Pregnancy should be an exciting time, but for some women in Kenya it can be a dangerous experience. Women in sub-Saharan Africa have a one in 38 chance of dying in pregnancy or childbirth, compared with one in 3,700 in developed countries. It’s a situation exacerbated by limited access to quality, affordable healthcare for many low-income families, the geographical remoteness of some communities, which often means there is a lack of infrastructure, and a culture of mistrust for medical professionals, in favour of untrained community “midwives”.

    When maternity-care provider Jacaranda Health was first established in Kenya in 2010, it was these women whom the organisation wanted to reach, running mobile clinics in tents before building more permanent facilities. Today, it runs an 18-bed hospital in Kahawa West, Nairobi, where it has provided maternal care to more than 30,000 women and delivered more than 3,000 babies. In 2016, the hospital reported that it had 66% fewer maternal and newborn complications than nearby facilities.

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    Cashew farm brings people and profits back to rural Bali

    Cashew farm brings people and profits back to rural Bali


    East Bali Cashews is improving the lives and livelihoods of women and their communitiesThe village of Ban in northeast Bali’s Karangasem district in Indonesia is an agricultural community that suffers from pervasive poverty. In addition to a scarcity...

    East Bali Cashews is improving the lives and livelihoods of women and their communities

    The village of Ban in northeast Bali’s Karangasem district in Indonesia is an agricultural community that suffers from pervasive poverty. In addition to a scarcity of jobs, education levels are low among the 9,000 villagers; few achieve a high school diploma and many women do not finish primary school.

    Ketut Yasa is one of the few women in her village to have finished middle school. Rarer still, she has received vocational training in cookery, her personal passion. However, in an area where cashew farming is the principal source of livelihoods and the average income is less than $2 (£1.63) per day, Yasa felt she had little choice but to work in the tourism industry.

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