The Salt Lake Tribune

    Salt Lake City complains Ogden’s airport is trying to hijack its name


    Salt Lake City is spending $3.6 billion to rebuild its international airport, so it is less than thrilled that Ogden may hijack its name for its own airport.Utah’s seventh largest city is proposing to rename its airport the “Ogden-Salt Lake Regional...

    Salt Lake City is spending $3.6 billion to rebuild its international airport, so it is less than thrilled that Ogden may hijack its name for its own airport.

    Utah’s seventh largest city is proposing to rename its airport the “Ogden-Salt Lake Regional Airport” to attract more airlines there.

    Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski is protesting, prompting the Ogden City Council to at least temporarily postpone a final vote that it had scheduled for Tuesday.

    “Given the beautiful new airport that Salt Lake City is building, we’re not surprised that other communities want to be associated with it,” said Biskupski’s spokesman, Matthew Rojas.

    “We, unfortunately, feel this proposed name change could cause some passenger confusion,” he said. Rojas added that Biskupski’s office had not heard about Ogden’s plans until contacted by The Salt Lake Tribune on Thursday, and then called Ogden to raise concerns.

    Ogden City Council Chairman Rich Hyer said the city has been discussing the renaming in public meetings since March, and had scheduled a final vote for Tuesday. He said the city administration asked that it be pulled to allow discussion about Biskupski’s objections, so he is unsure when a vote may now occur.

    “We’re not trying to be Salt Lake City’s airport,” Hyer said, but it is trying to let out-of-state people better understand where it is. “We’re trying to make it a little easier to find us. If you’re from somewhere in Texas, you don’t know where Ogden is.”

    Actually, he said Ogden isn’t trying to use Salt Lake City’s name at all.

    “It’s not designed to be Salt Lake City, just Salt Lake — the lake, not the city,” he said. Hyer adds that his council seems to be supportive of the proposal that came from the city’s administration.

    Tom Christopulos, Ogden’s director of community and economic development, said the proposal is designed to possibly attract more commercial airlines to Ogden.

    Allegiant Air operates twice-weekly flights from Ogden to Mesa, Ariz., but recently canceled routes to Los Angeles and Las Vegas because of low ridership.

    The name change would “help us in our recruiting,” and may be a factor in some airlines choosing to go there, he said. “That’s probably the reason Salt Lake is opposed to it.”

    Christopulos said the name change could attract more start-up airlines, secondary airlines and others “who may not be able to continually afford the gate fees” at Salt Lake City International Airport.

    “This is not unprecedented,” he said, adding that several smaller airports nationally have added the names of nearby large cities to help them attract attention and business.

    Examples include airports in Rockford, Ill., 86 miles from Chicago, called Chicago Rockford International Airport; Manchester, N.H., 53 miles from Boston, called Manchester-Boston Regional Airport; and Baltimore, Md., 32 miles from Washington, D.C., called Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.

    The Ogden-Hinckley airport is 38 miles from Salt Lake City International Airport.

    “Ogden is a beautiful destination itself,” Rojas said on behalf of Biskupski. “Using the airport to help brand it as a destination is an opportunity that really should be taken advantage of” without using Salt Lake City’s name.

    Christopulos said the proposed name change, “is a way, quite honestly, to get our state Legislature to start thinking of airlines as regional transportation, instead of centralized air transport.”

    He added, “We are getting to the point that we have such congested travel” on Wasatch Front highways “that it would be good to start looking at secondary airports” such as Ogden and Provo to drop air passengers closer to their final destinations. Cities in those two cities have some airline service, but need more.

    “It’s an economic engine” for those smaller cities, too, he said. Christopulos adds the name change isn’t an overall solution, “but it’s just an idea we think will help.”

    How Sebastian Saucedo went from Real Salt Lake ball boy to budding RSL star

    How Sebastian Saucedo went from Real Salt Lake ball boy to budding RSL star


    Sebastian Saucedo was on the sideline back when Kyle Beckerman, Nick Rimando and the rest of the Real Salt Lake squad played at Rice Eccles stadium. Only, he wasn’t wearing claret and cobalt then. He was just another starry-eyed elementary schooler...

    Sebastian Saucedo was on the sideline back when Kyle Beckerman, Nick Rimando and the rest of the Real Salt Lake squad played at Rice Eccles stadium. Only, he wasn’t wearing claret and cobalt then. He was just another starry-eyed elementary schooler serving as a ball boy and dreaming of a professional soccer career.

    “Growing up in Utah, who would have known a young kid [from Park City] would have been able to just play in general?” Saucedo said in the week after he scored his first MLS goal for RSL at Seattle on May 26.

    Saucedo is on track to have a breakout year, not only scoring his first MLS goal but also logging more assists (three) in 11 appearances than he has in the rest of his career combined. He got his opportunity when several minor injuries kept Joao Plata out of the lineup, and while he has yet to displace Plata from his starting role, Saucedo has solidified himself as a prominent figure in RSL’s attack .

    “The last month, he’s defending better,” said assistant coach Freddy Juarez, who has coached Saucedo since he played for the RSL Academy. “He’s playing for the team, he’s keeping possession, he’s giving assists, he’s scoring. He’s not a [finished] product by any means, but he’s starting to take advice from other people, applying it and becoming a little bit more of a complete player.”

    Saucedo’s parents were watching from home when Saucedo sent a scorcher from outside the box past the diving goalkeeper and into the back of the net at Seattle last month. His mom later told him after the game that his father was so overwhelmed with pride that he had to leave the room.

    “I’ve had a couple goals in Mexico,” Saucedo said of his season on loan to Veracruz, “and he was there for one of them, so I couldn’t believe hearing my mom tell me that, that he would be so emotional.”

    Saucedo had expected just a gruff, “Good job, on to the next one,” from his dad, Martin Saucedo. But watching his son score for RSL meant more to Martin than Sebastian had anticipated.

    Sebastian, or Bofo as most call him, grew up training with his dad at the North 40 fields in Park City from a young age. Martin always wanted to set his son up in the best environment to advance his soccer career, and Saucedo quickly rose from the Basin Rec (where he said he’d get access to the field house after school and stay there until it closed) to the Park City Soccer Club. It was his stint with South Weber club La Roca that put him on the RSL Academy’s radar.

    “It was just the creativity,” Juarez said about what made Saucedo stand out when he recruited him. “He had a knack to get by guys and then create either a pass for someone else, a shot for someone else, or he scored himself. So that’s the first thing. That’s the type of player you think have a high ceiling, and we can now put in a more competitive environment we can work on all the other things, the psychological and all that.”

    So Saucedo left his family and Park City to join the academy in Casa Grande, Arizona. The lifestyle change was the biggest adjustment for Saucedo. On the field, he scored 50 goals in 60 under-15/16 U.S. Soccer Development Academy matches and five in four matches with the U-17/18 squad. He was named the 2013-14 West Conference Player of the Year.

    Because of his success at the Academy, Saucedo was highly touted heading into the professional ranks. Plus, he was the first homegrown signing from Utah. And then he barely played.

    Saucedo signed a homegrown contract in July, 2014, but at the time he didn’t have the benefit of being able to get minutes with the Real Monarchs, RSL’s USL affiliate that played its first season in 2015.

    Though there have been some exceptions, “academy guys ... aren’t really ready to go from academy to first-team soccer,” Juarez said. “And so we all see a guy that can score in the academy and think he’s going to come [and do the same thing on the first team]. It’s not true.”

    So Saucedo asked for a loan and played in Liga MX. When he returned to RSL last year, he got to play, but usually off the bench.

    This season he came out swinging. In his first appearance of 2018, 13 minutes off the bench in a 5-1 loss to LAFC, Saucedo took a shot. He’s averaged almost two shots per game since. And hasn’t looked back.

    He’s now on the field with Beckerman and Rimando, players he looked up to as a kid. And he’s doing more than just wearing claret and cobalt.

    SAN JOSE QUAKES AT REAL SALT LAKE
    At Rio Tinto Stadium
    Kickoff • Saturday, 8 p.m.
    TV • KMYU
    Radio • 700 AM
    Records • RSL 7-7-1, San Jose 2-9-4
    Last meeting • Last meeting » RSL 4, SJ 0 1 (Aug. 23 at Rio Tinto Stadium)
    About the Quakes • San Jose has not won a match since May 12, when it beat Minnesota 3-1. ... Chris Wondolowski enters the match seven goals shy of Landon Donovan’s all-time MLS record. ... Midfielder Anibal Godoy and defender Harold Cummings are away on international duty. ... Defender Salinas is sidelined due to injury. ... Joel Quiberg (knee) is listed as questionable for the match.
    About RSL • They enter the match with a six-game home winning streak. ... Kyle Beckerman has a propensity for scoring on San Jose, netting four goals against the Earthquakes since 2006. ... RSL goalkeeper Alex Horwath (achilles), midfielders Jordan Allen (knee) and Luke Mulholland (back), and defenders Tony Beltran (knee), Shawn Barry (knee), and Demar Phillips (ankle) remain sidelined due to injury. ... Joao Plata (back) is listed as questionable for the match.

    ‘It just unlocked this whole family tree’: BYU students help find the living relatives of soldiers missing in action

    ‘It just unlocked this whole family tree’: BYU students help find the living relatives of soldiers missing in action


    Melanie Torres didn’t have much to start with.The personnel file she got from the Army listed only the missing soldier’s name and his brother’s name. A partial immigration record from 1905 noted the little village in Italy where their family lived...

    Melanie Torres didn’t have much to start with.

    The personnel file she got from the Army listed only the missing soldier’s name and his brother’s name. A partial immigration record from 1905 noted the little village in Italy where their family lived before resettling in the United States. She searched first for that.

    The coastal Sicilian town pulled up millions of responses in a Google search. She narrowed it with their last name. The results didn’t look any better. She added “World War II veteran.” Nothing.

    Torres switched her screen to FamilySearch, a genealogical website, and typed in the town again. There was microfilm that she could read at the library with birth, death and marriage records for the village from 1812 to 1915. It included thousands of images. She put it on hold.

    After 100, 200, 300 clicks scanning through the material, she found it: an atti di nascita — Italian birth certificate — from 1892 with the brother’s name.

    “It just unlocked this whole family tree,” Torres said.

    From there, she got their parents’ names. She found three other siblings, too. And she followed the new leads back down the line to the missing soldier’s relatives who are alive today.

    “They have this missing piece in their family that they want to figure out.”

    Torres’ research is part of a U.S. Army project to find the living relatives of soldiers who went missing in action from World War II (which the United States entered in 1941) through the first Gulf War in Iraq (launched in 1990).

    Brigham Young University’s Center for Family History and Genealogy in Provo is helping to track them down.

    The military has assigned 65 cases to the Utah school since last year. A group of BYU students and faculty has found family members for 48 of them — including Torres’ work on the file of the Italian immigrant soldier, which she solved in May after 50 hours of digging and days before graduating.

    The goal is that when remains of soldiers are found abroad — searches which the Army is actively conducting — they can be returned to families for burial and a sense of closure.

    “That’s a commitment that the United States has made,” said Chuck Prichard, spokesman for the military’s Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. “These men and women have gone off into harm’s way to protect our way of life. As a nation, we owe it to them to bring them back.”

    From WWII through the Gulf War, 82,000 American soldiers are unaccounted for, Prichard noted. More than 72,000 are from World War II. About 7,000 are from the Korean War. And less than 1,600 are from the Vietnam War.

    The Army reaches out to living relatives of those missing in action — once BYU and other researchers locate them — and asks them if they’re willing to do a DNA test, which can be compared to any found remains, most of which are skeletal.

    From October 2016 to March 2017, the army returned 183 soldiers to their families.

    The process of finding those relatives, though, is a difficult one. Jill Crandell, who oversees BYU’s family history center and its efforts on the project, said there’s often little information to start with. It’s sort of like if Sherlock Holmes were trying to solve a case blindfolded.

    And the genealogical researchers are essentially working in reverse. Instead of building a family tree back in time for several generations, they’re trying to build it forward to today. They’re finding the living through the name of the dead.

    “There’s just enough clues for us,” Crandell said.

    BYU, a private university, is owned by the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which has a dedicated genealogical division and operates FamilySearch (one of the world’s largest databases for family records). That’s why the military chose the school for its project. It’s the only college of the 19 participating to focus on finding living relatives for missing soldiers; the others specialize in anthropology and archaeology.

    Crandell said some cases take a couple of weeks to finish, some take a couple of months. There’s one that her students have been investigating for a half-year that’s not solved yet.

    “All of these cases seem to have something tricky in them,” said Kimberly Brown, an undergraduate working on the project.

    The BYU team — five students, a fellow and Crandell — worked on a case where the mother of a soldier continued to set a plate at the dinner table each night for her son, who was missing in action. They also spoke to the 97-year-old widow of a WWII soldier who still wants to know what happened to her husband. In Torres’ case, the Italian brother whose name she had and whose birth certificate she found also turned out to be unaccounted for, having died while fighting with United States troops in Europe.

    Torres feels a connection to the family after learning its story. She also had a great-grandfather who served in World War II and a grandfather who had a military career. Her husband, too, is in the Air Force.

    “It hits close to home,” she said. “I have family and I would want to know what happened to them if, heaven forbid, they go missing in action.”

    Arpaio, alleging Justice Department tried to sway voters against him in 2016 election, calls for investigation of his defeat


    Phoenix • Joe Arpaio is seeking an investigation into his claim that the U.S. Justice Department meddled in his unsuccessful 2016 campaign for sheriff in metro Phoenix.Arpaio, now a candidate for the U.S. Senate seat held by retiring Sen. Jeff Flake,...

    Phoenix • Joe Arpaio is seeking an investigation into his claim that the U.S. Justice Department meddled in his unsuccessful 2016 campaign for sheriff in metro Phoenix.

    Arpaio, now a candidate for the U.S. Senate seat held by retiring Sen. Jeff Flake, alleges the federal agency tried to sway voters against him by agreeing to push a criminal contempt of court case against Arpaio just weeks before the election.

    In asking Attorney General Jeff Sessions for the investigation, Arpaio’s lawyer Mark Goldman made parallels between the Justice Department’s actions in Arpaio’s case and its conduct in the investigation into whether Russia meddled in the 2016 presidential race and whether then-candidate Donald Trump’s campaign was involved. Goldman cited an anti-Trump text message made by an FBI agent who was once part of the team conducting the Russia investigation.

    “Given that these high-ranking FBI officials had no qualms about discussing methods of overthrowing the future president, it is more than reasonable to believe that the there was a concerted effort to steer and influence the election of Sheriff Arpaio,” Goldman wrote in a June 1 letter to Sessions.

    Months after losing the sheriff’s race by nearly 13 percentage points, Arpaio was convicted of criminal contempt after he was found to have intentionally disobeyed a judge’s order to stop his traffic patrols that targeted immigrants.

    The retired lawman was spared a possible jail sentence a month later when Trump pardoned him, reversing what critics saw as a long-awaited comeuppance for a lawman who escaped accountability for headline-grabbing tactics.

    While Arpaio has acknowledged disobeying the judge’s order, he said he was treated unfairly when Justice Department lawyers appeared in court a few weeks before election day to say they would prosecute Arpaio.

    Arpaio blames the Justice Department, but the criminal charge against him was filed by a judge, not by prosecutors from the federal agency.

    In an interview Wednesday, Arpaio insisted he wasn’t opportunistically using a Trump strategy by attacking the Department of Justice’s conduct. “I am not jumping on a bandwagon,” Arpaio said.

    The Justice Department declined to comment on Arpaio’s investigation request and the claim that the agency tried to turn voters against Arpaio.

    “It’s unfortunate that Joe Arpaio is focused on re-litigating his unsuccessful 2016 election — as an Arizonan, I can tell you he lost because he doesn’t have command of the issues affecting our state,” said Shawn Dow, campaign manager for former state Sen. Kelli Ward, one of Arpaio’s GOP primary opponents in the Senate race.

    The campaign of U.S. Rep. Martha McSally, another Republican running for the Senate race, didn’t respond a phone call and email seeking comment.

    Judge fines Utah environmental group, says it abused legal process by challenging counties’ secret meetings with feds before Trump shrank national monuments


    A 7th District judge has ordered the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance to pay San Juan County’s legal costs in defending a recent lawsuit that alleged its County Commission violated state law when it met privately with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to...

    A 7th District judge has ordered the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance to pay San Juan County’s legal costs in defending a recent lawsuit that alleged its County Commission violated state law when it met privately with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to lobby for the recision of Bears Ears National Monument.

    Pursuing his own motion after tossing the suit in April, Judge Lyle Anderson concluded SUWA abused the legal process. The group’s suit was intended to pester the county “with the improper purpose of dissuading commissioners from lobbying federal officials,” wrote Anderson, who retires from the bench at the end of this month.

    “We strongly disagree that SUWA brought this case in bad faith,” said SUWA legal director Steve Bloch. “This clearly falls within the scope of the Open and Public Meetings Act.”

    San Juan County has submitted a bill for $3,053.65.

    SUWA is fighting the sanction, arguing Anderson may have violated a judicial ethics rule barring judges from conducting independent research and fact gathering.

    “It is highly unusual for a judge to raise sanctions on his own, and even more unusual for the judge to then base sanctions on his own independent research and evidence that was not presented to him by a party,” said SUWA’s appellate lawyer Troy Booher. “It’s especially troubling when the plain language of the [open meeting] statute supports SUWA’s position.”

    SUWA has appealed Anderson’s June 1 dismissal of its suit, along with another issued by 6th District Judge Marvin Bagley rejecting a similar case against Kane and Garfield counties. Anderson’s ruling of court fees is now being cited by a new motion from Kane and Garfield to extract their fees from the environmental group widely reviled by southern Utah politicians.

    SUWA’s “action is brought to take advantage of rural Utah counties by threatening litigation and seeking attorney fees, knowing that rural counties do not always have the means to oppose such litigation and potentially pay plaintiff’s attorney fees,” wrote the counties’ lawyers.

    In a June 6 decision, Bagley tossed SUWA’s claim arising from those two counties’ commissioners unnoticed meetings with federal officials to lobby for the reduction of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. The disputed gathering occurred during Zinke’s May 2017 tour through Utah.

    The key issue is whether the subject of the commissions’ meetings with Zinke were ones in which the body held “jurisdiction or advisory power,” according to Anderson’s ruling. State law exempts public bodies from holding open meetings to discuss matters over which they hold no authority.

    Since local governments have no legal say over national monuments, Anderson concluded SUWA’s case was so frivolous, akin to asserting that “apples are oranges,” that no reasonable lawyer would ever argue it.

    SUWA contends the commissioners’ wielded real influence over the Bears Ears question, a matter of the utmost importance to all Utahns.

    “These meetings are not administrative in nature. They were focused on things within the county’s advisory authority,” Bloch said. “They held their meetings in secret because they didn’t want the public to understand what they were advocating to Secretary Zinke and other officials.”

    Zinke’s three private meeting with San Juan commissioners came in stark contrast with those held by his immediate predecessor, Sally Jewell, while she toured the region in 2017 to weighi public sentiment regarding Indian tribes’ proposal for a Bears Ears monument. Jewell met with public officials only in open settings.

    Although the judge ridiculed SUWA’s arguments as “laughable,” Zinke gave preferential treatment to county commissioners’ concerns during his review of large national monuments. And President Donald Trump invoked the wishes of local leaders when he stripped 2 million acres from the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase monuments in a Dec. 4 ceremony at the Utah Capitol.

    George F. Will: Charles Krauthammer was a diagnostician of our public discontents


    Washington • When he was asked how to become a columnist, Charles Krauthammer would say, with characteristic drollery, “First, you go to medical school.” He did, with psychiatry as his specialty because, he said with characteristic felicity, it...

    Washington • When he was asked how to become a columnist, Charles Krauthammer would say, with characteristic drollery, “First, you go to medical school.” He did, with psychiatry as his specialty because, he said with characteristic felicity, it combined the practicality of medicine and the elegance of philosophy. But he also came to the columnist craft by accident. Because of one.

    It has been said that if we had to think about tying our shoes or combing our hair we would never get out of the house in the morning. Life is mostly habitual -- do you actually remember any details of driving home last evening? The more of life’s functions that are routinely performed without thinking, the more thinking we can do. That, however, is not how life was for Charles after his accident.

    In 1972, when he was a 22-year-old student at Harvard Medical School, he was swimming in a pool. Someone pushed the diving board out, extending over a shallower part of the pool. Charles, not realizing this, dove and broke his neck. At the bottom of the pool, “I knew exactly what happened. I knew why I wasn’t able to move, and I knew what that meant.” It meant that life was going to be different than he and Robyn had anticipated when they met at Oxford.

    He left two books at the pool. One was a text on the spinal cord. The other was Andre Malraux’s novel “Man’s Fate.”

    Paralyzed from the neck down, he completed medical school, did an internship and, one thing leading to another, as life has a way of doing, became not a jewel in the crown of the medical profession, which he would have been, but one of America’s foremost public intellectuals. Nothing against doctors, but the nation needed Charles more as a diagnostician of our public discontents.

    During the 1980 presidential campaign, Charles wrote speeches for the Democratic vice presidential candidate, Walter Mondale, who did not realize -- neither did Charles — that the campaign harbored a thinker who soon would be a leading light of contemporary conservatism. Dictating columns when not driving himself around Washington in a specially designed van that he operated while seated in his motorized wheelchair, crisscrossing the country to deliver speeches to enthralled audiences, Charles drew on reserves of energy and willpower to overcome a multitude of daily challenges, any one of which would cause most people to curl up in a fetal position. Fortunately, with more brain cells to spare than the rest us have to use, he could think about doing what was no longer habitual, and about national matters, too.

    Charles died at 68, as did, 19 years ago, Meg Greenfield, the editor of The Washington Post’s editorial page. For many years, Meg, Charles and this columnist met for Saturday lunches with a guest — usually someone then newsworthy; now completely forgotten — at a Washington greasy spoon whose name, the Chevy Chase Lounge, was grander than the place. Like Meg, Charles was one of those vanishingly rare Washingtonians who could be both likable and logical. This is not easy in a town where the local industry, politics — unlike, say, engineering; get things wrong and the bridges buckle — thrives on unrefuted errors.

    Medicine made Charles intimate with finitude — the skull beneath the skin of life; the fact that expiration is written into the lease we have on our bodies. And his accident gave him a capacity for sympathy, as Rick Ankiel knows.

    Ankiel was a can’t-miss, Cooperstown-bound pitching phenomenon for the St. Louis Cardinals -- until, suddenly and inexplicably, he could not find the plate. Starting the opening game of a playoff series at age 21, the prodigy threw five wild pitches and his career rapidly spiraled far down to ... resurrection as a 28-year-old major league outfielder, for a short but satisfying stint in defiance of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s dictum that there are no second acts in a life. As Charles wrote, Ankiel’s saga illustrated “the catastrophe that awaits everyone from a single false move, wrong turn, fatal encounter. Every life has such a moment. What distinguishes us is whether — and how — we ever come back.”

    The health problems that would end Charles’ life removed him from the national conversation nine months ago, so his legion of admirers already know that he validated this axiom: Some people are such a large presence while living that they still occupy space even when they are gone.

    George Will’s email address is [email protected].

    Alexandra Petri: Instagram shows all the fun Ivanka Trump has had since the border policy was announced

    Alexandra Petri: Instagram shows all the fun Ivanka Trump has had since the border policy was announced


    “Remember that nothing is forever, except that you’re a parent.”— Ivanka Trump, “Women Who Work”May 8: Attorney General Jeff Sessions announces that a new zero-tolerance policy of prosecuting all those who enter the country illegally may...

    “Remember that nothing is forever, except that you’re a parent.”

    — Ivanka Trump, “Women Who Work”

    May 8: Attorney General Jeff Sessions announces that a new zero-tolerance policy of prosecuting all those who enter the country illegally may cause families to be separated. Based on statistics released Tuesday by the Trump administration for May 5 to June 9, approximately 65 children are separated from their parents every day.

    May 9: About 65 children are separated from their parents.

    May 10: About 65 children are separated from their parents. I should not say “are separated.” This is too passive. The children and their parents arrive together, and then U.S. agents mark the children as unaccompanied minors and send them to a detention facility.

    May 11: We separate 65 children from their parents. It is like a summer camp, except for the minor detail that you get to go to a summer camp voluntarily and your parents know that is where you are being sent.

    May 12: We separate 65 children from their parents.

    May 13: We separate 65 children from their parents. It is just like when a parent commits a crime and goes to jail, defenders of the policy suggest. It is just like that, except instead the children are sent to a detention facility all by themselves.

    May 14: U.S. agents separate about 65 children from their parents.

    May 15: At the border, U.S. agents separate 65 children from their parents, give or take a child. Give or take a child.

    May 16: Sixty-five children, more or less, are marked as unaccompanied minors, although they have arrived at the border with parents, and are sent to a detention facility.

    May 17: This is not so bad. The 65 children who are taken from their parents today will get to watch television at the facility, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen reassures us.

    May 18: Thirty children are taken from their parents, then 35 more. Or maybe yesterday they were lax and only took 50 children away (telling their parents they were going to take baths) and did not bring them back. But if that was true, they must make up for it today, and so today it is 70 children.

    May 19: Sixty-five children are taken from their parents.

    May 20: A child is taken from her parents and then a child is taken from his parents and then a child is taken from her parents. This happens 65 times.

    May 21: Another 65 children arrive at the border with their parents and are taken away from them.

    May 22: As a special surprise, the children taken from their parents today are all child actors! No. They are just children, again.

    May 23: Sixty-five children are taken from their parents.

    May 24: On Instagram, Ivanka remembers the time her son came to visit her at the office as her ”#lunchdate” with a #tbt photo. They had chicken and broccoli and walked past the Rose Garden. Also, 65 children are taken from their parents.

    Love it when Theodore comes to visit me at the office 😀 ☀️ #LunchDate #TBT

    A post shared by Ivanka Trump (@ivankatrump) on May 24, 2018 at 1:44pm PDT

    May 25: Sixty-five children are taken from their parents.

    May 26: Sixty-five children are taken from their parents.

    May 27: On Instagram, Ivanka holds her son close and presses their foreheads together. “My

    Rep. John Curtis holds a commanding 36-point lead over his familiar foe Chris Herrod, poll shows

    Rep. John Curtis holds a commanding 36-point lead over his familiar foe Chris Herrod, poll shows


    Chris Herrod worked this campaign to convince voters in Utah’s 3rd Congressional District that he’s their guy in the Republican primary race. Incumbent U.S. Rep. John Curtis is “not conservative,” he said after a debate last month.Herrod, though,...

    Chris Herrod worked this campaign to convince voters in Utah’s 3rd Congressional District that he’s their guy in the Republican primary race.

    Incumbent U.S. Rep. John Curtis is “not conservative,” he said after a debate last month.

    Herrod, though, looks to be on the brink of defeat, according to a new poll by The Salt Lake Tribune and Hinckley Institute of Politics. The survey shows Curtis ahead among every category of political leanings among Republicans, especially moderates, but even including voters who identify as “very conservative.”

    Curtis has the support of 57 percent of registered Republican voters just days before Utah’s primary election, compared to 21 percent support for Herrod, the poll shows.

    “We would expect that Curtis would be polling better among moderates because Herrod has specifically designed his appeal around reaching out to the most conservative, more extreme wing of the party,” said Adam Brown, an assistant political science professor at Brigham Young University.

    “The fact that even that appeal ... even those that are most conservative are going for Curtis, suggests that even saying things that appeal to the most conservative voters won’t overcome an eight-year track record as mayor of a major city,” Brown said.

    Curtis was a popular Provo mayor until he stepped down last year after winning a special congressional election.

    The poll, conducted by the Hinckley Institute at the University of Utah from June 11-18, surveyed 183 registered Republicans in the 3rd District and has a margin of error of plus or minus 7.2 percentage points.

    This year’s race might seem familiar to voters in the district that straddles the line of Salt Lake and Utah counties. Last year they chose between Curtis, Herrod and Republican Tanner Ainge to replace former Rep. Jason Chaffetz, who left mid-term for a job at Fox News. Curtis won that three-way race, and he later soundly defeated Democrat Kathie Allen.

    The poll shows the district’s voters approve of the Curtis’ work since they elected him, with 57 percent strongly or somewhat approving his performance. Eighteen percent disapproved, and 25 percent were unsure.

    Republican Party delegates – who are typically more conservative than the general electorate – favored Curtis over Herrod at this year’s nominating convention. But they declined to give Curtis a big enough win to allow him to skate straight to the general election and bypass a primary, setting up the race with Herrod.

    The Tribune’s poll follows others that also showed Curtis with a commanding lead, and it was definitive enough for Herrod to acknowledge that he faces slim odds come Tuesday.

    “Obviously the poll is disappointing if it is accurate,” Herrod said. “We have received positive feedback and will continue to keep working to the end.”

    “We knew that it was an uphill battle from the beginning to take on someone who has the incumbent status and the ability to raise money,” he said.

    Curtis has far outraised Herrod during the election cycle. He has also been willing to critique President Donald Trump, whom the survey shows also is viewed very favorably in the district. Some 69 percent of the 255 voters surveyed in the 3rd District had a very or somewhat favorable view of Trump’s performance.

    Curtis was critical of Trump’s talk of stiff tariffs against some of the country’s closest trading partners, supported the special investigation into Russia’s attempts to meddle in the 2016 and its contacts with Trump’s campaign, and on immigration. Herrod has backed Trump all the way.

    “It is somewhat surprising in the poll that President Trump is doing so well and yet we are not,” Herrod said.

    The poll results didn’t surprise the Curtis camp.

    “This is pretty well in line with all the polling that we’re seeing,” said Adrielle Herring, Curtis campaign manager. “We’re just finding that voters are really appreciating Congressman Curtis’ outreach. He is extremely accessible.”

    Bagley Cartoon: Yours, Ours and Mines


    This Pat Bagley cartoon appears in The Salt Lake Tribune on Friday, June 22, 2018.You can check out the past 10 Bagley editorial cartoons below:Deficit DeceitCaught!A Mother’s GriefFreedom Festival FolliesOur Foxy Friends Check Back Later Seat of Power...

    This Pat Bagley cartoon appears in The Salt Lake Tribune on Friday, June 22, 2018.
    You can check out the past 10 Bagley editorial cartoons below:
    Deficit Deceit
    Caught!
    A Mother’s Grief
    Freedom Festival Follies
    Our Foxy Friends
    Check Back Later
    Seat of Power
    Undoing Obama’s Legacy
    EPA’s Scott Pruitt and Free Stuff
    The Utah Swamp
    Want more Bagley? Become a fan on Facebook.


    Tribune editorial: UTA got its sneaky tax increase — now it really has to improve


    After an elaborate effort to provide political cover, Salt Lake County now will have the sales tax increase for transportation that its voters turned down three years ago. It started with an accommodating bill in the Utah Legislature’s 2018 session....

    After an elaborate effort to provide political cover, Salt Lake County now will have the sales tax increase for transportation that its voters turned down three years ago.

    It started with an accommodating bill in the Utah Legislature’s 2018 session. Salt Lake County voters had rejected the same tax increase in 2015, so legislators passed it instead as a county option, allowing counties to raise the tax without another public vote.

    That was followed by some sly passiveness by the Salt Lake County Council. Instead of voting the tax increase up or down, the council passed the buck. They set up an arrangement in which the individual cities in the county would need to approve it. If cities representing two-thirds of the county population signed on, the tax increase would be approved.

    Then it was just a matter of getting enough city councils — all of whom get the pothole and gridlock calls from constituents — to give the thumbs up to what is a county tax. The cities voted on it, but it still went down this week as the county raising taxes.

    In the murky world of political accountability, this is the perfect dodge. Taxes have gone up, and no government entity holds the full burden of responsibility. That’s not to say the money isn’t needed. The potholes and gridlock are real. But the unwillingness to go back to voters who refused once before only builds more cynicism about necessary government expenditures.

    Of course, the voters’ reluctance in 2015 had nothing to do with potholes and everything to do with the Utah Transit Authority, whose financial credibility was compromised by high executive pay, scandal and $2 billion in debt.

    UTA (yes, it will remain UTA) is on the verge of its new world order where accountability to the governor is direct. It’s too soon to tell if that has bought them the public’s trust, but starting next year they will get the money anyway – about $23 million annually in Salt Lake County (40 percent of the $58 million the tax increase generates).

    It’s not enough to launch any rail lines or build infrastructure, and that’s a good thing at this point. UTA is pledging to spend it on increasing bus service, something that is needed — both more routes and later operating times.

    So here’s a challenge, new UTA: Add riders. Despite our fast-growing population, UTA hasn’t grown its ridership. Gas prices have now gone up, so that should be helping.

    If UTA spends the $23 million without getting a lot more people on the bus, those 2015 voters just got punked.

    Ask Ann Cannon: Seriously, stop playing favorites with grandkids


    I’m still hearing from readers about grandparents who play favorites.(AUTHOR’S NOTE: Hey, grandparents! STOP PLAYING FAVORITES!)Anyway, these two letters represent the variety of responses I’ve received. Thanks to those of you who responded. Dear...

    I’m still hearing from readers about grandparents who play favorites.

    (AUTHOR’S NOTE: Hey, grandparents! STOP PLAYING FAVORITES!)

    Anyway, these two letters represent the variety of responses I’ve received. Thanks to those of you who responded.

    Dear Ann Cannon • You asked for feedback from readers who found themselves in similar situations to your reader who confronted the “favorite grandchild” issue without the desired result. When I discussed with my mom about her favoritism for my sister’s daughter, she actually acknowledged it but was unconcerned about it. She said that it was what it was and that my sister’s daughter was more like her own child than a grandchild.

    I had two choices: I could be angry and resentful or I could allow my children to learn a hard lesson. The thing is — not every lesson our children learn about love is a happy one. And so my children learned that not everyone loves the same. That relationships are tricky. That this fact is NOT a reflection of their value but a reflection on the person doing the loving. That everyone loves in their own way. And that when it comes to relationships, they get to decide the boundaries of those relationships and articulate them in a way that brings them joy. Or not.

    Fast forward 20-plus years. My mom cannot understand why my kids are not closer to her. It seems to me that it is now her turn to learn some lessons about relationships, and I truly wish her peace and love in the lesson she wrote for herself all those years ago.

    What Goes Around

    Dear Ann Cannon • My paternal grandfather always showed favorites. He had a favorite granddaughter and grandson, although he had 10 grandchildren. I was not a favorite, and to my knowledge, my parents never said anything about it to my grandfather. When my father continued this “tradition” with my youngest son, at first I, too, said nothing. When he made a horrible comment about this grandson when he was a teenager (in front of the entire family), I decided enough was enough. I handled it through my mother. I told her in private that I loved my dad, but I would no longer tolerate the way he treated my youngest son, and it was my job as his mother to stand up for him, even if it created a family problem. I asked my mom to talk to my father and explain that his behavior would no longer be tolerated by my husband and me, and if it continued, we, as a family, would no longer be able to associate with my parents.

    It worked!

    My mother explained the situation to my father and the favoritism stopped. As my youngest son and his brothers grew into adulthood, my father was able to admit just how special each of his grandsons was.

    Grateful

    Remember how I said I’d ask my bookseller for recommendations per your requests? Here are some suggestions for beach reads this summer. Do a little investigating and see if any of these titles appeal to you.

    “Calypso” by David Sedaris“Love and Ruin” by Paula McLain
    “Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore” by Matthew Sullivan
    “Ransom” by David Malouf
    “Slow Horses” by Mick Herron
    “Straight Man” by Richard Russo
    “The Book of Essie” by Meghan MacLean Weir
    “The Lying Game” by Ruth Ware
    “The Rosie Project” by Graeme Simsion
    “The Scribe of Siena” by Melodie Winawer
    “The Soul of an Octopus” by Sy Montgomery
    “The Tiger” by John Vaillant

    Kirby: If you’re a Utah guy, there’s a 90 percent chance you’ll need to be rescued after doing something dumb this summer


    I have been physically lost twice in my life. By lost, I mean someone had to come and find me before I expired.The first was when I was 7 years old and thought I could take care of myself in downtown Zaragoza, Spain. Within a hundred yards, I had no idea...

    I have been physically lost twice in my life. By lost, I mean someone had to come and find me before I expired.

    The first was when I was 7 years old and thought I could take care of myself in downtown Zaragoza, Spain. Within a hundred yards, I had no idea where the hell I was. It seemed like a week but was probably no more than 10 minutes.

    The Old Man found me, threatened my life for scaring Mom like that, and reunited me with my siblings, who, in truth, would have been fine if I had stayed lost.

    The last time I needed rescuing was shortly after high school, an incident that doesn’t bear exploring beyond the fact that I was inebriated and mostly naked.

    Otherwise, I have always had the presence of mind to find my own way out of the official status of “being lost” and into the status of “being in trouble.”

    Why is this important? Well, needing to be rescued is a lamentable condition largely particular to my gender.

    According to statistics recently released by the National Park Service, search-and-rescue operations were conducted in Utah’s national parks 324 times last year, a 68 percent leap from 2014.

    Here’s the most interesting part: Half the rescues were for guys, typically in their 20s.

    Note: I am not talking about men and women. I’m talking about “guys.” There’s a difference in the same way there is between a woman and a “gal.” One implies a certain level of reason, the other not so much.

    If you’ve ever been a guy — and there’s no shame if you’re not, given that 89 percent of us (that’s right, I’m a guy) are morons — you’ll know what I’m talking about.

    A guy will look at a 500-foot cliff and think, “It’s 105 degrees, the only water I have is in my bladder, and I’ve never done this before, but I bet I could climb that awesome thing.”

    Conversely, a “gal” is more apt to think twice, as in, “How will I take selfies if I need to use both hands to climb?”

    But we’re talking about guys. The important thing is that it’s usually a guy stuck on a cliff, wedged in a slot canyon, or wandering around with his tongue full of needles from trying to lick cactus for moisture. Meanwhile, trained professionals are forced to go get him.

    Part of the reason is that guys are more adventurous than normal men. Their brains haven’t caught up to their physical capabilities, and it makes them vulnerable to self-destructive impetuousness, known in the psychiatric community as “gross dumbassery.”

    Add booze and/or the mere presence of a reasonably attractive female in the bargain and you’re on your way to a perfect search operation — even if it’s just a “body recovery.”

    Guys are going to be guys, no matter what. If nothing else, this column should serve as a pointless reminder to them to be careful this summer. It’s dangerous out there for the young and inexperienced.

    It’s also dangerous for the old and well-experienced. I’ve reached the age when even my backyard is dangerous. The only difference is that I’ll be easier to find — if someone notices that I’m missing.

    Political Cornflakes: First lady’s jacket choice befuddles the world


    First lady’s jacket choice befuddles the world. Love votes against hardline immigration bill. Poll: Rep. Curtis has strong lead over Herrod.Happy Friday. The world still seems confused by first lady Melania Trump’s choice of a jacket to wear during...

    First lady’s jacket choice befuddles the world. Love votes against hardline immigration bill. Poll: Rep. Curtis has strong lead over Herrod.

    Happy Friday. The world still seems confused by first lady Melania Trump’s choice of a jacket to wear during her visit to Texas to see immigrant children. The first lady wore a green, hooded military jacket from the fast-fashion brand Zara that read “I really don’t care, do u?” both as she departed and returned to Washington. Her office said it was just a jacket, but was she sending a message to her husband? Or about the immigration issue? Or was she just cold in the Texas and Washington summer humidity? [PBS]

    Topping the news: The only House member from Utah to do so, Rep. Mia Love voted against a hardline immigration bill that then failed on a 193-231 vote. [Trib] [DNews]

    -> Rep. John Curtis appears to be cruising to a primary election win next Tuesday as a new Salt Lake Tribune-Hinckley Institute of Politics poll shows him with a 57-21 percent lead among Republican voters over Chris Herrod in the 3rd District. [Trib]

    -> The Canadian firm Glacier Lake Resources announced its intention to mine copper and cobalt on public lands that used to be part of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, although it is unlikely the company will be able to do so soon. [Trib] [KSL]

    Tweets of the day: From @EricBoehlert: "when does the House’s Vote To Humiliate Paul Ryan Again begin?”

    -> From @davidhodge20: "The real news of the day is that her husband’s jacket somehow fits Melania.”

    -> From @aedwardslevy: "honestly this whole jacket controversy seems.... fabricated”

    Happy Birthday: On Saturday to former Utah County Republican Party Chairman Taylor Oldroyd.

    Behind the Headlines: Tribune Washington bureau chief Thomas Burr, government and politics editor Dan Harrie and editorial page editor George Pyle join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories, including Utah leaders’ response to Trump’s family separation policy.

    Every Friday at 9 a.m., stream “Behind the Headlines” online at kcpw.org or tune in to KCPW 88.3 FM or Utah Public Radio for the broadcast.

    In other news: The U.S. Supreme Court overturned its 1992 ruling and opened the door for states to pass laws requiring businesses making online sales to be in charge of collecting sales taxes. Here’s how it will affect Utah businesses. [Trib]

    -> Gov. Gary Herbert praised the Supreme Court decision and said it reflects the realities of the modern retail market. [Fox13]

    -> A group of Holladay residents are opposed to the city’s plan to develop apartments on the site of the old Cottonwood Mall, arguing that it would crowd people without boosting the city’s economy. [Trib]

    -> Utah’s minority population has grown by 129,526 people since 2010, according to new estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau. [Trib]

    -> Pat Bagley wonders whether Utah GOP lawmakers really care about protecting the state’s wild lands. [Trib]

    -> Robert Gehrke says that President Donald Trump’s nomination of Utah anti-immigration activist Ron Mortensen is as good as dead after Sen. John McCain and Sen. Jeff Flake voiced opposition to the nomination. [Trib]

    Nationally: The House rejected a hardline immigration bill and delayed a vote on a compromise, showing the GOP’s disarray over immigration. [NYTimes] [WaPost]

    -> White House insiders say that there is a sense that Stephen Miller, President Donald Trump’s senior policy adviser who was behind the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, should stay behind the scenes as the debate over immigration continues. [Politico] [CNN]

    -> A Pentagon spokesman said the U.S. is preparing to shelter up to 20,000 unaccompanied migrant children at four military bases in Texas and Arkansas. [NYTimes]

    Got a tip? A birthday, wedding or anniversary to announce? Send us a note to [email protected].

    -- Thomas Burr and Connor Richards

    Twitter.com/thomaswburr and Twitter.com/crichards1995

    Forest Service proposal would eliminate special designations for sage grouse in Utah, other states


    Boise, Idaho • The U.S. Forest Service proposed changes Wednesday to sage grouse protections in six Western states that call for eliminating special designations for crucial habitat, as well as keeping areas open for mining.The agency also said...

    Boise, Idaho • The U.S. Forest Service proposed changes Wednesday to sage grouse protections in six Western states that call for eliminating special designations for crucial habitat, as well as keeping areas open for mining.

    The agency also said restrictions on water development for livestock will be removed, as will other requirements that could limit some livestock grazing.

    The plan, detailed in documents, covers 9,500 square miles of greater sage grouse habitat in Idaho, Colorado, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah and Montana.

    “The objective of what we’re doing right now is to be, on the whole, neutral to positive for the grouse,” said Forest Service spokesman John Shivik.

    The Obama administration in 2015 opted not to list the chicken-sized, ground-dwelling bird as needing federal protections under the Endangered Species Act and instead imposed land-use restrictions leading to multiple lawsuits from industry and environmentalists.

    In one of those lawsuits, a U.S. court agreed with mining companies that the Forest Service created some safeguards in Nevada after failing to give the public enough information to participate in a meaningful way. In response, the Forest Service said those same safeguards exist in other states, so it decided to review plans outside Nevada as well.

    Greta Anderson of Western Watersheds Project, an environmental group, blasted the Forest Service proposals.

    “What it’s doing is making it easier for industry to work around the conservation measures that were intended in the 2015 plans,” she said. “The greater sage grouse continues to decline in the West. These revisions aren’t changing that trajectory.”

    Between 200,000 and 500,000 sage grouse remain in 11 Western states, down from a peak population of about 16 million. Experts generally attribute the decline to road construction, development, and oil and gas leasing.

    Researchers say sage grouse once occupied about 463,000 square miles, but that’s now down to about 260,000 square miles.

    The males are known for performing an elaborate ritual that includes making balloon-like sounds with two air sacks on their necks.

    Sage grouse didn’t receive federal protection in 2015, but officials are expected to review that decision in 2020.

    A key component of the 2015 plan included establishing key sage grouse habitat called focal areas that restricted development. The move is considered part of the reason sage grouse didn’t receive federal protections.

    Under the Forest Service’s latest proposal, focal areas would be eliminated.

    Shivik said the elimination of the areas doesn’t mean protections for sage grouse will be removed. He said the land will still be designated priority sage grouse habitat with restrictions on surface development.

    The Forest Service only has jurisdiction over about 8 percent of sage grouse habitat, with most of the rest on U.S. Bureau of Land Management property. The Forest Service has been working with the BLM, which also is reviewing its plans for the struggling bird following an order by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.

    John Freemuth, a Boise State University environmental policy professor and public lands expert, said there’s significant pessimism among conservationists on how the Trump administration ultimately handles sage grouse.

    “The seeming promotion of oil and gas over every other value — there are reasons for people to be concerned about this,” he said. “But in defense of the administration, let’s just see how it all plays out.”

    The revision process started in November with the Forest Service seeking public comments. Those remarks — some 55,000 — led to the current proposals, with new comments being taken through July 20. The agency will use the comments to create an Environmental Impact Statement for sage grouse habitat.

    Jennifer Rubin: Trump can be managed. But only by a party with a spine.

    Jennifer Rubin: Trump can be managed. But only by a party with a spine.


    The assertion that President Donald Trump never backs down or is a “tough negotiator” is belied by his nearly 18 months in office.He caved to Kim Jong Un — throwing in the cessation of military exercises with South Korea as a sort of parting gift....

    The assertion that President Donald Trump never backs down or is a “tough negotiator” is belied by his nearly 18 months in office.

    He caved to Kim Jong Un — throwing in the cessation of military exercises with South Korea as a sort of parting gift. He has backed down on a slew of things: agreeing to a continuing resolution that didn’t fund the wall he wants; signing a budget he said he wouldn’t sign; not following through with his previous calls for immediate withdrawal from Afghanistan; not making good on a threat to fire special counsel Robert Mueller III; putting a promised reprieve for ZTE in doubt; and not fulfilling promises to pursue gun legislation (after the National Rifle Association had a talk with him).

    He has sworn that he’ll stick by embattled advisers and Cabinet members, only to relent and can them (with the exception of Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt). He finds it impossible to resist giving away the store (including code-word intelligence) to Russia.

    One sure sign that he’s not all that tough: Tough, tenacious guys who do not back down don’t have to lie about responsibility for their own actions.

    The real problem in forcing Trump to back away from dangerous and counterproductive actions is getting his own party to oppose him. The child separation policy was a rare exception. On everything from Trump family conflicts of interest to racist language to a horribly misguided trade war, Republicans have curled up in the fetal position and prayed that Trump’s ire would not be directed at them.

    Even worse, both Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., won’t bring up legislation that could pass their respective houses unless they know Trump likes it (hence no fix for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program). Likewise, the GOP-controlled Senate will not reject the unqualified, extreme and unethical nominees he puts forth.

    Trump, in other words, would very likely back down more consistently if he were challenged more consistently.

    The good news is that the country need not rely on sporadic national backlashes to curb Trump’s worst rhetoric and decisions. The midterms are less than five months away. With a Democratic majority in one or both houses, Democrats could provide oversight, transparency and accountability on everything from emoluments to the administration’s efforts to make Obamacare coverage more expensive.

    Despite Trump’s North Korea summit and constant effort to gin up his base by stoking racial animus, Republicans still look poised to lose their shirts in November. The most recent CNN poll finds Democrats leading in the generic ballot, 50 percent to 42 percent, and a similar 50 percent to 43 percent advantage in enthusiasm. Similar results in the generic ballot can be seen in the Economist-YouGov (44/37), Quinnipiac (49/43) and Monmouth (48/41) polls.

    Now, Democrats have been accused of having no message, or just not a clear message. It seems pretty clear to me - put an end to pandemic corruption in this administration and stop Trump from doing extreme and horrible things that violate our democratic and moral standards while also hurting even his own voters (e.g. tariffs, increasing Obamacare premiums).

    In short, a “Stop the madness” or at least a “Limit the madness” message has more attraction as Trump’s behavior becomes more unhinged and Republicans’ obsequiousness becomes more galling. When Democrats can induce their GOP colleagues to stand up to Trump, even a little, Congress periodically has been able to force Trump to retreat from actions that offend the vast number of Americans.

    Conversely, Republicans’ notion that Democrats in the majority will prevent things from getting done does not hold up when this Congress cannot manage to address any major issue other than an unpopular tax plan. It is not as if Republicans have been passing all sorts of helpful measures on immigration, health care, infrastructure, trade, etc.

    No one would be foolish enough to predict midterm elections this far out. Nevertheless, if Republicans don’t do something dramatic to alter the trajectory of the race, at least one house will have a Democratic majority. And then Americans can rest just a little easier at night.

    Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Washington Post, offering reported opinion from a center-right perspective.

    Max Boot: A diverse student body adds value to campus life

    Max Boot: A diverse student body adds value to campus life


    The controversy over race and admissions at elite educational institutions is heating up. Harvard University is under pressure to stop discriminating against Asian-Americans, who make up a smaller percentage of its student body (22.2 percent) than their...

    The controversy over race and admissions at elite educational institutions is heating up. Harvard University is under pressure to stop discriminating against Asian-Americans, who make up a smaller percentage of its student body (22.2 percent) than their grades and test scores would warrant. Meanwhile, Stuyvesant High School in New York, a selective public school, is under pressure to start discriminating against Asian-Americans who make up 72.9 percent of its students.

    This is an agonizing debate. On one side are smart Asian-American students who study hard. Many are first-generation immigrants whose parents toil at bodegas or dry cleaners, sacrificing everything so that their children can get an education. It is heartbreaking to tell those kids that they can’t get into the school of their choice.

    But if Asian-Americans predominate in elite institutions, that means opportunities are being denied to African-Americans, Latinos or whites who also grow up in poverty but in cultures — whether in the inner city or Appalachia — that stigmatize rather than celebrate learning. Many minorities must also cope with racial discrimination, crime, broken homes and police abuse to a far greater extent than Asian-Americans do, and they lack access to test tutors.

    In the past, I would have reflexively taken the side of the Asian-Americans — and not just because I have two stepchildren who are half Asian. As an immigrant myself (I was born in Russia) and a product of the meritocracy (I have a BA from the University of California at Berkeley and an MA from Yale University), I’ve always believed in rewarding academic merit. But as I’ve grown older, I have come to appreciate that there is more to merit than test scores alone and that there is value in diversity.

    The tipping point for me, so to speak, was a 2005 New Yorker article, “Getting In,” by Malcolm Gladwell. He pointed out that Ivy League schools such as Harvard are not just trying to select the best academic performers but also the students who will go on to have the greatest success after graduation — and those aren’t necessarily the ones who got the highest test scores. Gladwell cited a study of graduates from Hunter College Elementary School in New York, who were selected solely based on a test, and found that “they weren’t nearly as distinguished as they were expected to be.”

    By contrast, a study of male Ivy League athletes found that, “despite their lower SAT scores and grades, and despite the fact that many of them are members of minorities and come from lower socioeconomic backgrounds than other students,” they “turn out to earn a lot more than their peers.” These jocks are hard-working, competitive, gregarious and team-oriented — qualities that ultimately turn out to be more important than pure cognitive ability.

    There is, moreover, value in a diverse student body. You learn more about life if you go to class with people who are different from you — who have different abilities, different geographic origins, different social classes, different sexualities, different religions, different political views and, yes, different ethnicities. You don’t necessarily want a student body made up entirely of bookworms — and I say that as a bookworm myself.

    You can’t achieve a diverse class simply by taking the top test scores. Harvard foundin a 2013 review that if it selected solely based on academic achievement, the number of Asian-Americans would rise from what was then 19 percent to 43 percent — compared with a U.S. population that is just 5.7 percent Asian. The Supreme Court ruled in 2016 that schools could take race into account as long as it is one factor among many, and Harvard appears to be doing just that.

    I have greater reservations about New York Mayor Bill de Blasio’s attempts to eliminate the admissions test for Stuyvesant and seven other selective public high schools. He wants to guarantee admission to the top 7 percent of students at every middle school even though, as one Stuyvesant graduate noted, at 1 out of 6 middle schools “not even 7 percent of seventh graders passed the state math exam.” Admitting students who aren’t able to keep up does them no favors and can destroy a school’s academic quality. De Blasio’s interim plan, to reserve 20 percent of the slots for low-income students who just missed the test cutoff, may make more sense.

    No admissions policy will please everyone. The good news is that the stakes aren’t as high as parents think. As Gladwell pointed out, students who are good enough to get into elite schools will do well in life even if they go elsewhere. This isn’t Korea or Japan where your life is pretty much over if you don’t get into one of the top few universities. The United States is a big, sprawling country where — as the careers of individuals as varied as Sen. Mitch McConnell (University of Louisville), Philip Roth (Bucknell University) and Steve Jobs (Reed College dropout) attest — there are lots of ways to succeed even if you didn’t go to an Ivy League college or an elite high school.

    Max Boot, a Washington Post columnist, is the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick senior fellow for national security studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and a global affairs analyst for CNN. A best-selling historian, he is the author most recently of “The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam.”

    Pierce: Should kids watch ‘13 Reasons Why’? Parents, it’s your job to decide

    Pierce: Should kids watch ‘13 Reasons Why’? Parents, it’s your job to decide


    If you’re a parent and you’ve got a Netflix subscription, I would advise extreme caution about letting your kids watch “13 Reasons Why.”Unlike some advocacy groups, I’m not in favor of banning the show. Or of forcing Netflix to remove it from...

    If you’re a parent and you’ve got a Netflix subscription, I would advise extreme caution about letting your kids watch “13 Reasons Why.”

    Unlike some advocacy groups, I’m not in favor of banning the show. Or of forcing Netflix to remove it from the lineup.

    Call me crazy, but I think people should make decisions for themselves. If you pay for a Netflix subscription, what right does anyone — let alone an advocacy group with a history of questionable ethics — have to censor what you can watch? These are not public airwaves.

    I’m loath to name the group and give it publicity, but … the Parents Television Council frequently misrepresents TV content, floods the Federal Communications Commission with bogus complaints and falsely claimed World Wrestling Entertainment was responsible for the deaths of four children (and was forced to pay $3.5 million when the WWE sued).

    Earlier this week, the PTC directly blamed Netflix for several deaths by suicide.

    To be clear, this is not a defense of the show. The series centers on a 17-year-old who killed herself and left tapes explaining why — blaming enemies and friends. There are depictions of rape, sexual assault and drug abuse. If you’re looking to be entertained, look somewhere else.

    The series has severe critics and ardent defenders. Does depicting suicide lead young, troubled, impressionable viewers to mimic the behavior? Or does it bring the issue to the forefront and help prevent suicides?

    There is no lack of experts arguing both sides.

    Should your kids watch “13 Reasons Why”? That’s a decision you have to make.

    Netflix rates the show TV-MA — not for anyone under 17 — but there is no hard-and-fast rule, because not all 7-year-olds or all 17-year-olds are the same. You know your kids. You decide.

    You should watch the show yourself first. And if you decide to let your kids see it, you should watch it with them. You should discuss what happens. It can be an opening to let them know you’re there for them. It can, as some have argued, open a line of communication. It can even be a lifeline.

    Yes, that requires time and effort. But nobody ever said parenting would be easy. Monitoring and regulating what your kids watch is part of the job.

    Parents shouldn’t delegate that responsibility to Netflix or any other TV outlet. And, no matter how much noise they make, advocacy groups should never be allowed to ban anything.

    If they want to advise parents about TV shows, that’s fine. You don’t have to listen to them.

    Or to me, for that matter.

    Not that Netflix is caving to outside pressure. It has just ordered a third season of “13 Reasons Why,” which will stream in 2019.

    Behind the Headlines: Utah’s leaders respond to families being separated at the border, Greg Hughes might be disqualified from the inland port board and a Navajo candidate sues San Juan County


    Utah’s religious and political leaders respond to the Trump administration’s initial policy of separating families at the borders. Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes owns land close to the boundaries of the proposed inland port, which appears to...

    Utah’s religious and political leaders respond to the Trump administration’s initial policy of separating families at the borders. Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes owns land close to the boundaries of the proposed inland port, which appears to disqualify him from the board he appointed himself to. And in San Juan County, a Navajo candidate files a lawsuit challenging the county’s decision to disqualify him from the ballot.

    At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune Washington bureau chief Thomas Burr, government and politics editor Dan Harrie and editorial editor George Pyle join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

    Every Friday at 9 a.m., stream “Behind the Headlines” online at kcpw.org or tune in to KCPW 88.3 FM or Utah Public Radio for the broadcast.

    Letter: Let’s arm the homeless


    Shot in the back by a trained security guard, homeless Thomas Stanfield has only himself and his community to blame. It’s true that he did nothing wrong. It’s true that no one deserves to lose their life while trying to improve it. It’s also true...

    Shot in the back by a trained security guard, homeless Thomas Stanfield has only himself and his community to blame. It’s true that he did nothing wrong. It’s true that no one deserves to lose their life while trying to improve it. It’s also true that Stanfield had no way to defend himself. As a member of a community that eschews guns, he was unarmed, as were his compatriots who may have otherwise been able to provide deterring force. As Randal Doyal points out in his well-considered position on school safety, the obvious answer is more guns and more threat of force. If Stanfield had followed the advice of countless gun advocates and been carrying his own firearm, he might still be alive today.

    In fact, because the homeless spend their lives on the street, they are the ideal task force to fight crime across our city. Unlike our police force, they don’t ever leave their beat. Ever vigilant and armed to the teeth, armed homeless would make our city dramatically safer. We deserve a safe community. Knowing that an armed populace guaranteeing mutually assured destruction is the only path to a comfortable, healthy environment, we must arm the homeless.

    Chris Sanger, Salt Lake City

    Letter: Teen doesn’t understand the need for comprehensive sex education


    I believe high school student Heather Ells was wrong in her guest op-ed column ”Utah students don’t need comprehensive sex education” (June 14). When she claims that only 41 percent of U.S. teens have had sex, that destroys her argument. I am sure...

    I believe high school student Heather Ells was wrong in her guest op-ed column ”Utah students don’t need comprehensive sex education” (June 14). When she claims that only 41 percent of U.S. teens have had sex, that destroys her argument. I am sure the number, is higher given that teens are not all going to admit to having had sexual activity and you just know it’s going on.

    A more alarming statistic is that condom use among sexually active teens in the U.S. fell from 62.8 percent in 2005 to 53.8 percent in 2017, as reported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USA Today, June 15). That clearly shows a need for comprehensive sex education in the public schools.

    A Planned Parenthood speaker at Cottonwood High gave a presentation to a health class this year promoting abstinence and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, but she told me that Utah law on sex education prohibits mention of birth control generally or condoms specifically.

    That discussion is only allowed after school hours, so if Ells’ class was discussing contraception during school time, it was breaking Utah law.

    Marty Bernstein, Midvale

    Letter: Why must we sue to get the truth from UDOT?


    What could be more important than making sure state agencies are not violating state law?A citizens group, CitizensAgainstTheWall.org, has clearly demonstrated that UDOT is not complying with state law and federal regulations by building a 17- to...

    What could be more important than making sure state agencies are not violating state law?

    A citizens group, CitizensAgainstTheWall.org, has clearly demonstrated that UDOT is not complying with state law and federal regulations by building a 17- to 20-foot-high by 3,225-foot-long noise barrier along I-80 at Jeremy Ranch in Summit County. It will be the largest noise barrier in the state and contrary to the mission of the Summit County general plan for open space and view shed preservation.

    UDOT has been unwilling and unable to verify that it is not violating state law. What are they hiding? The governor’s office, while having been contacted multiple times, has been silent.

    Citizens and taxpayers of Summit County as well as the entire state of Utah deserve real answers.

    With such blatant disregard for truth and transparency, one has to wonder how many other times UDOT has been arbitrary and capricious in not complying with state law. If left unaccountable, who will be next?

    UDOT has said the only way to stop the project would be to sue the agency. Why is it citizens cannot get the truth any other way?

    Tom Farkas, Park City

    ‘Behind the Headlines’: Utah leaders respond to family separation policy, Hughes’ property may disqualify him from inland port board and a Navajo candidate sues county that barred him from the ballot


    Utah’s religious and political leaders respond to the Trump administration’s initial policy of separating families at the border. Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes owns land close to the boundaries of the proposed inland port, which appears to...

    Utah’s religious and political leaders respond to the Trump administration’s initial policy of separating families at the border. Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes owns land close to the boundaries of the proposed inland port, which appears to disqualify him from the board he appointed himself to. And in San Juan County, a Navajo candidate files a lawsuit challenging the county’s decision to disqualify him from the ballot.

    At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune Washington bureau chief Thomas Burr, government and politics editor Dan Harrie, and editorial page editor George Pyle join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

    Every Friday at 9 a.m., stream “Behind the Headlines” online at kcpw.org or tune in to KCPW 88.3 FM or Utah Public Radio for the broadcast.

    Letter: Protect precious public lands


    When will Utahns come to their senses about the extremely polluting, often dangerous, destruction of our public lands caused by oil and gas extraction? The latest proposed atrocity before the BLM involves leasing public lands near Capitol Reef National...

    When will Utahns come to their senses about the extremely polluting, often dangerous, destruction of our public lands caused by oil and gas extraction? The latest proposed atrocity before the BLM involves leasing public lands near Capitol Reef National Park.

    The future for the oil and gas industry is bleak — as oil and gas energy sources become non-economic, they are being replaced by viable alternatives that can help meet energy demand without the dangerous impacts to public health. There are no socially redeeming reasons to continue extracting them, especially near our protected public lands like our national parks and national monuments.

    In the midst of the largest rollback of public lands protection in U.S. — and Utah — history, wild places remain at the heart of the anti-public lands movement. If these leases go to sale, Utah residents and visitors lose big time. Sanity will prevail and should start now. The BLM should pull these parcels from the lease process to protect these precious lands, and protect public health and safety.

    Stephen Bannister, Salt Lake City

    Jazz select Duke’s Grayson Allen No. 21 overall, earning Donovan Mitchell’s approval


    Before he finished his first interview as a Jazzman, Grayson Allen got the only endorsement that matters.Donovan Mitchell drove past cameras and onto the set where the one-time Duke star was fielding questions after he was drafted. Then he pulled Allen...

    Before he finished his first interview as a Jazzman, Grayson Allen got the only endorsement that matters.

    Donovan Mitchell drove past cameras and onto the set where the one-time Duke star was fielding questions after he was drafted. Then he pulled Allen in for a hug.

    “[The Jazz] can do so many things as you saw this season,” said Mitchell, voice hoarse. “Adding a guy like [Allen], you know, he’s an elite scorer, great defender, plays unselfish — man, we got a good one in him.”

    The former ACC competitors are about to be teammates. And the Utah Jazz hope the 22-year-old guard can be a helpful addition to a team that is looking for its third straight playoff berth next season.

    Allen was the pick at No. 21, earning the nod from the Jazz after reportedly dominating a workout earlier this month with fellow prospects Aaron Holiday, Jalen Brunson and Khyri Thomas. He also reportedly wooed Utah with maturity and character, helping assuage doubts about those traits after several ugly tripping incidents during his college career.

    While Allen is one of the best-known villains coming out of college basketball, he said he doesn’t think it will take long for him to change hearts and minds in the Jazz fanbase.

    “When fans see me night in and night out on the court, and the love that I have for the game, the passion that I have for the game, and how much I want to represent the Utah Jazz, the team I play for, in a great way, and how much love I have for the team, it’ll happen right away,” he said. “It’s a lot different watching a guy night in and night out than watching the same three clips for the last three years.”

    Allen is one of the most well-established (and oldest) players in the NBA draft, starting 97 games at Duke, where he played an instrumental role in winning the 2015 NCAA championship — beating Utah in the Sweet 16 along the way. As a senior, he averaged 15.5 points and 4.6 assists per game while sharing roles with two top-10 draft picks Marvin Bagley III and Wendell Carter Jr. Allen is a career 38 percent 3-point shooter in his four seasons with the Blue Devils.

    Some of Allen’s most memorable college moments, however, have been ones he’d probably rather the world forget. Several times, Allen has been caught by cameras attempting to trip opponents, building a reputation as one of college basketball’s great heels. Some of his clips include spats with Mitchell, who played against Allen for two seasons when he was at Louisville.

    But the Jazz were persuaded by a strong performance at the NBA Combine, an impressive in-person workout and a series of interviews that convinced them that Allen would fit the mold the team refers to as “Jazz DNA.” The Jazz hope that those incidents are behind him, but they were also drawn to his burning desire to win.

    “He and I were totally on the same page,” general manager Dennis Lindsey said. “We don’t want that fire, that competitiveness to go anywhere.”

    Coach Quin Snyder is also a Duke alum, which made Allen feel like he understands the Utah organization well.

    Allen views himself as an off-ball shooter and cutter, a player who has learned the value of passing and doesn’t want to take the ball off the dribble too often. His background playing with lottery talent helped enhance his draft stock for the Jazz.

    “He talked about what he had to sacrifice when he decided to stay,” Lindsey said. “And look, he’s going to have to sacrifice here as a young player. The fact that he had done that three out of four years at Duke, we were impressed with.”

    It’s Utah’s first pick from Duke since picking Rodney Hood in the 2014 NBA Draft, who was selected 23rd overall — also with a reputation as a great shooter.

    The move followed an surprising number of slides on draft night, highlighted by Missouri’s Michael Porter Jr. falling from a potential top-5 pick to No. 14 with the Denver Nuggets. Players linked to the Jazz in the pre-draft process — including Zhaire Smith, Donte DiVincenzo and Kevin Huerter — were selected in the first 20 picks.

    It was quite a night for Allen, who not only made a long-anticipated jump to the NBA, but further mended fences with Mitchell, whom he called a friend.

    “It’s really cool when you get a warm welcome,” he said. “It calms any nerves you have about joining a new team.”

    With Mitchell vouching for him, it might well calm the nerves of Jazz fans, too.

    How it happened: Full NBA Draft team-by-team selections


    Team-by-team breakdown of the players each team ended up with in the NBA draft (includes proposed trades):Atlanta Hawks1 (5) Trae Young, g, Oklahoma (traded from Dallas)1 (19) Kevin Huerter, g, Maryland1 (30) Omari Spellman, f, VillanovaBoston Celtics1...

    Team-by-team breakdown of the players each team ended up with in the NBA draft (includes proposed trades):

    Atlanta Hawks

    1 (5) Trae Young, g, Oklahoma (traded from Dallas)

    1 (19) Kevin Huerter, g, Maryland

    1 (30) Omari Spellman, f, Villanova

    Boston Celtics

    1 (27) Robert Williams III, c, Texas A&M

    Brooklyn Nets

    1 (29) Dzanan Musa, f, Cedevita (Croatia)

    2 (40) Rodions Kurucs, f, Barcelona (Spain)

    2 (45) Hamidou Diallo, g, Kentucky

    Charlotte Hornets

    1 (12) Miles Bridges, f, Michigan State (traded from LA Clippers)

    2 (34) Devonte’ Graham, g, Kansas (traded from Atlanta)

    2 (55) Arnoldas Kulboka, f, Capo d’Orlando (Italy)

    Chicago Bulls

    1 (7) Wendell Carter Jr., c, Duke

    1 (22) Chandler Hutchison, f, Boise State

    Cleveland Cavaliers

    1 (8) Collin Sexton, g, Alabama

    Dallas Mavericks

    1 (3) Luka Doncic, g, Real Madrid (Spain) (traded from Atlanta)

    2 (33) Jalen Brunson, g, Villanova.

    2 (56) Ray Spalding, f, Louisville (traded from Philadelphia)

    2 (60) Kostas Antetokounmpo, f, Dayton (traded from Philadelphia)

    Denver Nuggets

    1 (14) Michael Porter Jr., f, Missouri

    2 (41) Jarred Vanderbilt, f, Kentucky (traded from Orlando)

    2 (58) Thomas Welsh, c, UCLA.

    Detroit Pistons

    2 (38) Khyri Thomas, g, Creighton (traded from Philadelphia)

    2 (42) Bruce Brown Jr., g, Miami

    Golden State Warriors

    1 (28) Jacob Evans, f, Cincinnati

    Houston Rockets

    2 (46) De’Anthony Melton, g, Southern Cal

    Indiana Pacers

    1 (23) Aaron Holiday, g, UCLA

    2 (50) Alize Johnson, f, Missouri State

    L.A. Clippers

    1 (11) Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, g, Kentucky (traded from Charlotte)

    1 (13) Jerome Robinson, g, Boston College

    L.A. Lakers

    1 (25) Moritz Wagner, c, Michigan

    2 (47) Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk, g, Kansas

    Memphis Grizzlies

    1 (4) Jaren Jackson Jr., f, Michigan State

    2 (32) Jevon Carter, g, West Virginia

    Miami Heat

    NONE.

    Milwaukee Bucks

    1 (17) Donte DiVincenzo, g, Villanova

    Minnesota Timberwolves

    1 (20) Josh Okogie, g, Georgia Tech

    2 (48) Keita Bates-Diop, f, Ohio State

    New Orleans Pelicans

    2 (51) Tony Carr, g, Penn State

    New York Knicks

    1 (9) Kevin Knox, f, Kentucky

    2 (36) Mitchell Robinson, c, No College

    Oklahoma City Thunder

    2 (53) Devon Hall, g, Virginia

    2 (57) Kevin Hervey, f, UT-Arlington

    Orlando Magic

    1 (6) Mohamed Bamba, c, Texas

    2 (35) Melvin Frazier Jr., f, Tulane

    2 (43) Justin Jackson, f, Maryland (traded from Denver)

    Philadelphia 76ers

    1 (16) Zhaire Smith, g, Texas Tech (traded from Phoneix)

    1 (26) Landry Shamet, g, Wichita State

    2 (39) Isaac Bonga, f, Frankfurt Skyliners (Germany)

    2 (54) Shake Milton, g, SMU (traded from Dallas)

    Phoenix Suns

    1 (1) Deandre Ayton, c, Arizona

    1 (10) Mikal Bridges, f, Villanova (traded from Philadelphia)

    2 (31) Elie Okobo, g, Pau Orthez (France)

    2 (59) George King, g, Colorado

    Portland Trail Blazers

    1 (24) Anfernee Simons, g, IMG Academy

    2 (37) Gary Trent Jr., g, Duke (traded from Sacramento)

    Sacramento Kings

    1 (2) Marvin Bagley III, f, Duke

    San Antonio Spurs

    1 (18) Lonnie Walker, g, Miami

    2 (49) San Antonio, Chimezie Metu, f, Southern Cal

    Toronto Raptors

    NONE.

    Utah Jazz

    1 (21) Grayson Allen, g, Duke

    2 (52) Vince Edwards, f, Purdue

    Washington Wizards

    1 (15) Troy Brown Jr., g, Oregon

    2 (44) Issuf Sanon, g, Olimpija (Slovenia)

    Gators hold off Texas Tech 9-6 at CWS to make bracket final


    Omaha, Neb. • JJ Schwarz hit a two-run homer and Florida built enough cushion to survive Texas Tech’s six-run outburst over the seventh and eighth innings and eliminate the Red Raiders from the College World Series with a 9-6 win Thursday night.The...

    Omaha, Neb. • JJ Schwarz hit a two-run homer and Florida built enough cushion to survive Texas Tech’s six-run outburst over the seventh and eighth innings and eliminate the Red Raiders from the College World Series with a 9-6 win Thursday night.

    The Gators (49-20) have won two straight following a loss to Tech in their CWS opener and moved to the Bracket 2 final against Southeastern Conference rival Arkansas. The No. 1 national seed would have to beat the Razorbacks on Friday and again Saturday to return to the best-of-three championship round next week.

    Florida freshman Jack Leftwich (5-5) allowed seven hits, walked two and struck out five in 6 1/3 innings. He escaped trouble in the second and fourth innings before leaving with two runners on base in the seventh.

    That’s when Tech (45-20) and its high-scoring offense started to make trouble for the Gators and their bullpen.

    Tech scored three times against four pitchers in the seventh to make it a two-run game. The Gators got those three runs back in the top of the eighth, with Brady Smith tripling off the center-field wall.

    Tech came back with three more runs in the eighth against three relievers to make it 8-6. Florida got one of those runs back in the ninth, and Michael Byrne pitched a 1-2-3 ninth for his 16th save.

    Schwarz broke his right hand May 18 and returned to the lineup for Florida’s first CWS game. He was 1 for 11 in Omaha, and 1 for his last 20 overall, when he sent a 1-1 pitch from Ty Harpenau into the left-field bullpen for a 5-0 lead in the sixth. It was his 13th homer of the season and 50th of his career.

    The Gators went up 1-0 without getting a hit against Caleb Kilian (9-3) in the fourth when Jonathan India walked, took second on a wild pitch, stole third and came home on another wild pitch. They broke through for two runs on three hits in the fifth and extended their lead on Schwarz’s homer.

    The Red Raiders loaded the bases with one out in the second and had runners on first and second with one out in the fourth, but couldn’t push across any runs until their rally late in the game.

    Josh Jung went 3 for 5 with two RBIs and Grant Little drove in three runs for Texas Tech.

    Grant’s golden

    Tech’s Little made his second sensational catch of the CWS on Deacon Liput’s deep fly to left in the third inning. Little sprinted back, jumped and made the catch. He landed with his back against the fence to rob Liput of a sure double.

    Spinarama, baseball style

    Big 12 freshman of the year Gabe Holt swung so hard at a fastball from Leftwich in the second inning that he spun around and fell on his rear end. As would be expected, the boys in the Tech dugout got a good laugh.

    Up next

    Bracket 2 finalists Florida and Arkansas haven’t met since they opened SEC play in late March. The Gators won two of three in Gainesville, Florida, with India going 6 for 9 with a homer and four RBIs in the series.

    Kragthorpe: Jazz fans will eventually love the polarizing Grayson Allen


    In politics, it is labeled flip-flopping. In sports, it is just what fans do. In five minutes Thursday night, Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer J. Cox summarized the Utah slice of the 2018 NBA draft in the best way any Jazz devotee possibly could. In consecutive...

    In politics, it is labeled flip-flopping.

    In sports, it is just what fans do.

    In five minutes Thursday night, Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer J. Cox summarized the Utah slice of the 2018 NBA draft in the best way any Jazz devotee possibly could. In consecutive tweets, Cox campaigned against his favorite team’s pick of Duke guard Grayson Allen – and then welcomed him in capital letters.

    That’s how this stuff works, right?

    You will love Grayson Allen, because you love Joe Ingles and Jae Crowder and you once loved Matt Harpring. Maybe none of those guys arrived with anything resembling Allen’s reputation as a dirty player, but they’re exactly the kind of player whom fans like when he’s on their team and dislike when he’s playing against them.

    I’ll tolerate Allen, because of his shooting skills and athletic ability, as he demonstrated in the pre-draft process. And I have no doubt that Jazz fans eventually will embrace him, as former Atlantic Coast Conference rival Donovan Mitchell personally did in Brooklyn, interrupting ESPN’s interview with Allen to give him a hug.

    That’s what Cox virtually did as well, while jabbing himself for his wildly varying views of Allen. As the No. 21 pick approached, Cox tweeted, “Please don’t take Grayson Allen” and repeated that sentence seven times.

    Please don’t take Grayson Allen. Please don’t take Grayson Allen. Please don’t take Grayson Allen. Please don’t take Grayson Allen. Please don’t take Grayson Allen. Please don’t take Grayson Allen. Please don’t take Grayson Allen. Please don’t take Grayson Allen.

    — Spencer Cox (@SpencerJCox) June 22, 2018

    Naturally, when the Jazz defied the executive order, Cox responded, “I LOVE GRAYSON ALLEN SO MUCH!”

    Exactly.

    This would have been the perfect occasion for the Jazz to stage a draft party, for the sake of gauging the response to Allen. Social media suggests his selection would have been booed at a Gordon Hayward level – in the 2010 draft, I mean, not his anticipated visit with Boston next season.

    Allen will have to win over some percentage of Jazz fans; that’s understandable. I’m convinced he’ll do it, and so is he.

    “I think it’ll happen right away,” he said in a video conference with the Utah media, citing his “love” and “passion” for basketball that Utahns have always valued.

    . @SpencerJCox my friend,

    I’m going to retweet this mercilessly over the next few years.

    But you can still call me when you want to buy Grayson’s jersey and I’ll help you. https://t.co/ZJRWgj24GC

    — Steve Starks (@StevenStarks) June 22, 2018

    I wanted improved shooting so much for this team that I’ll accept everything else Allen brings. Actually, if it is properly channeled, the Jazz can use some more Duke attitude. That’s why I liked J.J. Redick in 2006, when he went just ahead of Jazz draftee Ronnie Brewer, and I have full confidence that the Jazz culture sufficiently will rein in Allen’s antics.

    “We got a good one,” Mitchell said during that ESPN interview of Allen. Mitchell’s endorsement is meaningful, considering Allen’s behavior in Duke-Louisville meetings.

    In advance of the Jazz’s draft, I’d targeted Maryland guard Kevin Huerter, who went to Atlanta two picks before Allen. My No. 2 choice in their range was UCLA guard Aaron Holiday, and I’ll accept the Jazz’s judgment that Allen outperformed him in a recent workout that also included top-40 picks Jalen Brunson and Khyri Thomas, a good wing defender.

    I’ll also trust that Jazz coach Quin Snyder got honest answers about Allen from Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski, among other sources, as a former Blue Devils player and coach. Snyder’s staff will make Allen an even better shooter, and he’ll blend into a team that’s getting tougher all the time.

    That’s a good trait, as the Jazz compete in the Western Conference. With the 2018 draft’s top four picks coming to the West, the Jazz must deal with improving teams while chasing the league’s elite franchises. As a four-year college player, Allen will help the Jazz right away, as much as anyone in their draft slot could do.

    And if he plays well enough to bug opposing players and fans, that will be a good sign. That’s what Ingles and Crowder do, making them all the more endearing around here. With the Jazz, Allen will have good role models, in multiple ways.

    Tony Jones’ draft analysis: The Hawks did great, the Knicks and Lakers made the wrong decisions


    1. Phoenix Suns: Deandre Ayton, center, ArizonaAyton offers the Suns everything except for a true rim protector. He can be an elite scoring big man in the NBA. He’s a terrific rebounder and is a great athlete and imposing presence. He’s ready to play...

    1. Phoenix Suns: Deandre Ayton, center, Arizona

    Ayton offers the Suns everything except for a true rim protector. He can be an elite scoring big man in the NBA. He’s a terrific rebounder and is a great athlete and imposing presence. He’s ready to play instantly with high upside. There are other arguments to be made, but Ayton was probably the best argument for the top pick. Grade: A-

    2. Sacramento Kings: Marvin Bagley III, forward, Duke

    Bagley should be a 20-point, 10-rebound per game guy for a good portion of his career. But the Kings should’ve picked Luka Doncic. Bagley is a good talent — but the Kings already have Harry Giles at the same position. And Doncic is the kind of dynamic perimeter talent that thrives in the NBA. Grade: C+

    3. Atlanta Hawks: Luka Doncic, forward, Slovenia

    Doncic is going to Dallas in a trade that will send Trae Young to the Hawks. Doncic is the best player in the draft, a 6-foot-8 do-everything type. He can play four positions and will fit in well with Rick Carlisle and the Mavericks. Dallas pulls off the first big win of the draft. Grade: A

    4. Memphis Grizzlies: Jaren Jackson Jr., forward, Michigan State

    Jackson may be the best defensive big man to come into the NBA in a long time. He projects as a rim protector who can also guard on the perimeter. He was a 39 percent 3-point shooter at Michigan State. He’s young and athletic, and has room to add significant strength. Jackson can be tutored by Marc Gasol. Grade: A

    5. Dallas Mavericks: Trae Young, guard, Oklahoma

    Young will be going to the Atlanta Hawks, which puts incumbent point guard Dennis Schroder on the trade block. It remains to be seen whether Young can win a team a title. But he is a tremendous draw, and the Hawks need all the fan support they can get. He’ll be a good player at the highest level for a long time. Grade: B+

    6. Orlando Magic: Mo Bamba, center, Texas

    The defense-poor Magic get the best defensive rim protector in the draft. Bamba has the chance to be an elite rim protector, and he has more offensive chops than many give credit for. He, along with Aaron Gordon and Johnathan Isaac, will form a very athletic frontcourt. Grade: A-

    7. Chicago Bulls: Wendell Carter, forward, Duke

    This is a safe pick for the Bulls, who could’ve swung for the fences with Michael Porter. Carter will be a good player for a long time, but he probably won’t be a star. He also probably won’t be a bust. At this point, that may be what the Bulls need. Grade: B

    8. Cleveland Cavaliers: Collin Sexton, guard, Alabama

    The Cavs, not knowing what LeBron James will do in free agency, need a functional point guard in the worst way, and Sexton may be the best point guard in the draft. He’s a relentless competitor. He’s athletic, can get to the basket at will off the dribble and is dogged defensively. Grade: B+

    9. N.Y. Knicks: Kevin Knox, forward, Kentucky

    Michael Porter’s medicals must be really bad, because he’s unquestionably the best player on the board. Knox is a good player, athletic with a bunch of upside. Porter, if healthy, has the chance to be an all-star. He must not be healthy. Grade: C+

    10. Philadelphia 76ers: Mikal Bridges, forward, Villanova

    A tough turn of events for Bridges, who thought he was going to be able to play for his hometown team, only to be traded to Phoenix. Welcome to the business side of the NBA. His fit with the Suns is a good one as a versatile defender who can shoot. He’s the best 3-and-D prospect in the draft. Grade: A-

    11. Charlotte Hornets: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, guard, Kentucky

    Good point guard with length and versatility. He improved significantly over the course of his freshman season. This pick is going to the Clippers, with Miles Bridges coming back in return. Grade: B

    12. L.A. Clippers: Miles Bridges, forward, Michigan State

    Good pickup for the Hornets. A good character kid who can shoot, play multiple positions and is athletic. Bridges isn’t going to be a superstar, but he’s the kind of player you win titles with. Good value pick for Charlotte, who swapped picks with the Clippers. Grade: B+

    13. L.A. Clippers: Jerome Robinson, guard, Boston College

    With Austin Rivers entering a contract season, Robinson can learn for a year and be ready to take off by year two. Robinson can score with the best of then and was one of the highest rising prospects in the draft process. He will help the Clippers off the bench right away. Grade: B

    14. Denver Nuggets: Michael Porter Jr., forward, Missouri

    It’s seldom a team can get a talent like Porter this deep in the draft, but here we are. Porter has No. 1 pick talent, but fell amid health concerns. He’s a natural roster fit with the Nuggets, who need a small forward in the worst way. And he’s the kind of talent you have to take at No. 14, no matter the risk. Grade: A

    15. Washington Wizards: Troy Brown, guard, Oregon

    Brown can do a bit of everything, and fits with John Wall and Bradley Beal as a blender. He’s a guy who can play and guard multiple positions. He has tremendous upside as well. Grade: B

    16. Phoenix Suns: Zhaire Smith, guard, Texas Tech

    This selection will be traded to the Philadelphia 76ers for the rights to Mikal Bridges. Smith becomes a nice athlete who can run alongside Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid. Bridges is a nice fit in Phoenix as a 3-and-D option who can play multiple positions. Guard: B-

    17. Milwaukee Bucks: Donte DiVincenzo, guard, Villanova

    Good fit with Milwaukee, which needs a backcourt guy that can create his own offense. DiVincenzo was terrific in the NCAA Tournament title game. He’s a dynamic athlete and a good shooter who can help the Bucks off the bench immediately. Grade: B

    18. San Antonio Spurs: Lonnie Walker, guard, Miami

    Terrific value pick for the Spurs. Walker has lottery talent, but medicals caused his stock to fall a bit on Thursday. He’s the kind of athlete and player that thrives with the Spurs. Walker is a guy who can be an alpha scorer with some seasoning. Grade: A

    19. Atlanta Hawks: Kevin Huerter, guard, Maryland

    Huerter is perhaps the best pure shooter in the draft, someone who can make perimeter looks in bunches. He can score off catch-and-shoot and off the dribble. He’s got good size at 6-foot-7 and is fearless on the floor. Grade: B-

    20. Minnesota Timberwolves: Josh Okogie, guard, Georgia Tech

    Okogie is one of the better athletes in the draft, and someone who can defend and get out and run in transition. The Wolves are losing Jamal Crawford and are short on wings who can defend beyond Jimmy Butler. Okogie projects as a natural fit there. Grade: B-

    21. Utah Jazz: Grayson Allen, guard, Duke

    Allen had a terrific pre-draft process and won his draft workout in Salt Lake City with the Jazz, so this isn’t a surprise. Allen can score in bunches and is a good athlete. He impressed the Jazz throughout the pre-draft process. Grade: B

    22. Chicago Bulls: Chandler Hutchison, guard, Boise St.

    Very good value. Hutchison is a good scorer with positional versatility. A team that had issues scoring last season, the Bulls need someone who can get a bucket. Hutchison does that. Grade: B+

    23. Indiana Pacers: Aaron Holiday, guard, UCLA

    Holiday will join fellow UCLA alum Darren Collison with the Pacers. He’s one of the best point guards in the draft and plays bigger than his size. Holiday knows how to be a pro, having two older brothers in the league. Good pick for the Pacers. Grade: B

    24. Portland Trail Blazers: Anfernee Simons, guard, IMG Academy

    Simons will be good … in time. The Blazers need someone who is good now. Maybe they didn’t think an early contributor was on the board. Simons has upside, but he needs to work hard to realize it. Should be interesting to see how his career goes. Grade: C+

    25. L.A. Lakers: Mo Wagner, forward, Michigan

    Wagner would’ve been a good pick 10 years ago. In today’s NBA, how is he going to defend? He’s not a rim protector, and he will get chewed up on switches by opposing guards. He is offensively talented, and he can shoot. But someone like Jacob Evans, a tough defending wing, would’ve been a better pick. Grade: C-

    26. Philadelphia 76ers: Landry Shamet, guard, Wichita State

    He’s an NBA shooter with NBA size for his position. What’s unsure is if Shamet has NBA athleticism or if he can defend NBA guards. With the Sixers having Ben Simmons and Markelle Fultz and having traded for Zhaire Smith, not sure another guard is what they needed. Grade: C+

    27. Boston Celtics: Robert Williams, center, Texas A&M

    Williams was projected for the lottery, but concerns about his motor caused him to drop. He’s an elite athlete and projects as a really good run-and-jump big … but so did Stromile Swift back in the day. Williams has to develop his game and improve his motor. The good news? He’s going to a great organization. Grade: B

    28. Golden State Warriors: Jacob Evans, forward, Cincinnati

    This is why the Warriors are the Warriors. They draft extremely well, and don’t overthink it. Evans was the best player on the board since No. 24, which means the Blazers, Lakers and Sixers all made a mistake in passing him. Only the Celtics drafting Williams gets a pass. Evans is a terrific player who can shoot and defend and play different spots. Grade: A

    29. Brooklyn Nets: Dzanan Musa, forward, Bosnia

    Very good offensive player who is confident in his abilities. Has great size for his position at 6-foot-9. He’s a great shooter and very good ballhandler. Is only 19 years old. He has to make a commitment to defend, but is smart value this late in the first round. Grade: B

    30. Atlanta Hawks: Omari Spellman, center, Villanova

    The Hawks have had a terrific draft. They’ve added a bunch of shooting around John Collins, and Spellman will serve as their stretch big man. Spellman improved a bunch over the past year. He’s someone who can make perimeter shots and block shots a bit as well. Grade: B+

    Deandre Ayton picked No. 1 by Suns; Hawks get lots of shooting with Trae Young, Kevin Huerter


    New York • The Phoenix Suns stayed close to home for their first No. 1 pick. The Dallas Mavericks looked all the way to Slovenia for the player they hope can be their next European superstar.Shortly after the Suns took Deandre Ayton to start the NBA...

    New York • The Phoenix Suns stayed close to home for their first No. 1 pick. The Dallas Mavericks looked all the way to Slovenia for the player they hope can be their next European superstar.

    Shortly after the Suns took Deandre Ayton to start the NBA draft Thursday night, the Mavericks traded up two spots for the rights to Luka Doncic.

    The Atlanta Hawks swapped the rights to Doncic, the No. 3 pick who has spent the last year winning championships all over Europe, to Atlanta for Trae Young, the No. 5 selection from Oklahoma.

    The Mavericks also gave up a future first-round pick to draft Doncic, who only arrived in New York on Wednesday after helping Spain’s Real Madrid win its league championship after he won Euroleague MVP and Final Four MVP honors when they won that title this year.

    His lengthy European season kept him from working out for teams but he knew the Mavericks were interested in having him on their team for what’s expected to be Dirk Nowitzki’s final NBA season.

    “I’ve been talking to Dallas a lot. They really wanted me, and they were very, very nice,” the 19-year-old said. “They were very nice to me, and I think we had a very good relationship.”

    The Hawks will get perhaps the most exciting player in college basketball last season in Young, the first player to lead the nation in scoring and assists in the same season.

    “Whatever city I went to, I was going to be able to be comfortable in,” said Young, who wore suit shorts with his burgundy-colored jacket. “I was just really excited to get to Atlanta.”

    Otherwise, the top of the draft was dominated by big men, starting with a pair of former high school teammates.

    The Suns made the 7-foot-1 Ayton the first No. 1 pick in franchise history. The center from Arizona averaged 20.1 points and 11.6 rebounds in his lone season in Tucson, tying for the national lead with 24 double-doubles in 35 games.

    He joined Mychal Thompson — father of Golden State All-Star Klay Thompson — in 1978 as the only players from the Bahamas to be the No. 1 pick in the NBA draft.

    “Having my name called to be the first pick for the Phoenix Suns was mind-blowing,” Ayton said. “Having all that confidence and leading up to that point when I saw Adam Silver came out, I was just waiting for my name, and when he called it, my mind went blank.”

    The Sacramento Kings followed by taking Marvin Bagley III, the Duke big man who played with Ayton at Hillcrest Prep Academy in Phoenix in 2015-16.

    With Jaren Jackson Jr. going fourth to Memphis, Texas center Mo Bamba going No. 6 to Orlando and Wendell Carter Jr. following to Chicago, it was an early run of big men in what’s increasingly become a perimeter-based league.

    Then it was another guard with Alabama’s Collin Sexton going at No. 8 to Cleveland, triggering chants of Michael Porter Jr.’s name by Knicks fans who hoped they would take him with the No. 9 pick. But they ended up disappointed as New York went with Kentucky’s Kevin Knox.

    “They booed (Kristaps) Porzingis (on draft night) and look where he is now. That’s the same mindset I’m going to have,” Knox said. “They can chant Michael Porter all they want. But they got Kevin Knox, and I’m willing to work and I’m willing to get better.”

    With concerns over back problems that limited him to only three games at Missouri last season, followed by a recent hip injury that he believe scared off teams, Porter ended up falling all the way to Denver at No. 14, the last lottery position.

    There were a couple other trades involving lottery picks. Mikal Bridges, the No. 10 pick from Villanova who thought he was staying in Philadelphia with the 76ers — who employ his mother — but was dealt to Phoenix for the rights to No. 16 pick Zhaire Smith of Texas Tech and a 2012 first-round pick from the Miami Heat.

    The Charlotte Hornets sent the rights to No. 11 pick Shai Gilgeous-Alexander — whose floral-patterned suit stood out among the selections — to the Clippers for No. 12 pick Miles Bridges and two future second-round picks.

    The Holiday brothers had an NBA reunion when Aaron Holiday was taken at No. 23 by Indiana. Brothers Jrue and Justin already play in the league.

    Monson: Don’t get tripped up on the Jazz picking Grayson Allen


    When the anticipation of the Jazz’s first-round pick in the NBA Draft barreled nearly three hours into the production and headlong toward reality on Thursday night, there was nothing that distinguished it from … well, standard.Not that there’s...

    When the anticipation of the Jazz’s first-round pick in the NBA Draft barreled nearly three hours into the production and headlong toward reality on Thursday night, there was nothing that distinguished it from … well, standard.

    Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

    There was no unfolding drama, there were no moves made. There was no price paid, no jumping up to snag a secret target otherwise beyond the Jazz’s reach.

    Instead, the draft’s first 10 selections morphed into the second 10, and then … the Jazz, with the 21st pick, took Grayson Allen, the 22-year-old Duke guard, widely known for his college antics and outbursts, who will be counted on — how’s this for standard? — to listen and learn and work in order to reward the team’s belief that he can help it win games.

    After being taken by the Jazz, he said he was ready to do exactly that.

    “I’m really excited,” he said, adding: “It fits perfectly. I’m just ready for the next step. This next step is what I’ve dreamed about.”

    Good for him.

    There will be no hasty grade issued here, no conclusive/premature evaluation, no insta-guess at nailing down what Dennis Lindsey accomplished. Responsible judgment will take time, we’ll give it … until summer league ends.

    Kidding.

    Allen is more mature than other draftees, at least in years lived, if not on-court behavior. He took big shots at Duke. He was an unselfish player who made sacrifices for his team. And he is athletic, as the Jazz discovered firsthand during his pre-draft workout. At the combine, he demonstrated a 40.5-inch vertical jump. At Duke, he was capable of hitting deep shots and maneuvering through traffic to get to the rim. He can create shots and score coming off of screens.

    That’s what the Jazz need.

    If Allen also was undisciplined at times and ultra-competitive to the point of screaming and stomping around, picking up technical fouls, losing his focus and his cool, we … uh, won’t get too tripped up on that.

    Upon his selection, Allen said he was looking forward to playing alongside his former ACC rival Donovan Mitchell and playing for Duke alum Quin Snyder: “I’m excited to be on the same team. … [Snyder’s] a great coach. I watched the Jazz play a lot. They move the ball. … I’m just really happy.”

    Best case, Allen will land in the transition from collegian to pro somewhere between Rudy Gobert and Donovan Mitchell, not in performances and results — let’s get real here — but in time frame to become useful. Mitchell’s rise was darn-near immediate, skidding over some early bumps to become the Jazz’s primary scorer in his rookie season. Gobert started slower, averaging nine minutes per game in his initial season, spending time in the G League, before making a steady climb in ensuing seasons to where he now exists.

    I’ll never forget Gobert in that first season, after having been taken with the 27th pick in the draft, sitting in front of his postgame locker, virtually alone. Without saying a word, the look on his face, his body language did the shouting: “When you guys are done fiddle-faddling around, when you’re ready to win, just let me know. I’m here. Put me in.”

    He was there, in an absent kind of way, although his pride, aggression and diligence shoved him in a positive direction in the seasons ahead.

    Now, it is Allen’s turn to find his attitude and his place on a Jazz team that has its foundation built, but that still needs consistent scoring, accurate shooting. How soon Allen will provide that depends in large measure on him. The Jazz have proved they are as good as any team at refining talent, at scrubbing blemishes in a player’s game, recognizing strengths and making them stronger.

    The Jazz will drop Allen in the lap of Johnnie Bryant or Alex Jensen or some other assistant to direct his progress, lather him up, starting tomorrow. It’s what they do.

    That’s how and why Mitchell said a couple of weeks ago that, upon reflection, when he looked at film of himself in the first 10 games of last season and then looked at the final 10 games, he “didn’t even recognize” his previous self.

    Allen said he looked forward to his own growth.

    For their part, the Jazz don’t expect him to be Mitchell or to be Gobert. They simply expect him to properly work at applying himself to become whatever it is he can be.

    What more could be expected? What more could be asked?

    If Allen does that, and he still isn’t good enough to help the Jazz win, it won’t be his fault. It will be Lindsey’s for picking him.

    Meanwhile, it’s kind of cool getting to know a new guy. A year ago, when Mitchell was selected, we learned among other things that he liked fire trucks and movies and video games, that his hero was his mom, that if he could handpick anyone to play him in a movie, he would select Kevin Hart, that his favorite midnight snack was Cap’n Crunch Berry Blast.

    A couple of weeks later, in his first summer league game at the Huntsman Center, we saw him go for 23 points with five assists, showing the embryonic skills he would advance over his first season. We also became convinced that the nice things he said when he found out the Jazz moved up to get him were authentic: “I’m excited to be part of the Jazz organization. It’s a dream come true. This is incredible.”

    It was incredible.

    Now, we’ll see, bit by bit, what Allen has to offer.

    Mitchell said he was stoked about his new teammate: “We got a good one in him.”

    GORDON MONSON hosts “The Big Show” weekdays from 3-7 p.m. on 97.5 FM and 1280 AM The Zone.

    One year after he was drafted, Donovan Mitchell enjoys celebrity status at NBA draft


    Donovan Mitchell felt overlooked at the 2017 NBA draft, sitting and waiting as 12 teams passed him over before he heard his name called. But, as Ben Simmons can attest, what a difference a year makes.Mitchell, last year’s 13th overall pick, was front...

    Donovan Mitchell felt overlooked at the 2017 NBA draft, sitting and waiting as 12 teams passed him over before he heard his name called. But, as Ben Simmons can attest, what a difference a year makes.

    Mitchell, last year’s 13th overall pick, was front and center, one of the hottest commodities in New York City this week. The Utah Jazz guard and NBA Rookie of the Year candidate was mobbed by adoring fans at a Times Square appearance and was a guest on Philadelphia 76ers guard J.J. Redick’s popular podcast. On Thursday night, Mitchell was a regular part of NBA TV’s draft night coverage and made multiple appearances on ESPN.

    His first appearance came about 30 minutes before the Phoenix Suns kicked things off by taking Arizona center Deandre Ayton with the first pick. Mitchell was interviewed by ESPN’s Maria Taylor, who asked him for his advice for this year’s draft class.

    “Just to embrace it and have fun. Like I said, this is the easy part. I told them that this morning,” Mitchell said. “Just enjoy it because once you get to the league it’s hard work. You’re a freshman all over again. You’re the new guy. …

    “This is a once in a lifetime experience. Have fun with it.

    Mitchell’s stop in New York was just the latest in a whirlwind summer tour — with stops in Greece, China and the Philippines — that has only highlighted the 21-year-old’s star quality and global popularity. Mitchell filmed autograph-seeking fans chasing his car through the streets of Manhattan this week and surrounding him as he made his way out of a Champs Sports in Times Square on Wednesday.

    On Thursday, Mitchell was mic’d up and under the lights at Barclay’s Center on NBA TV’s production stage. When it was time for the Clippers to draft at No. 13 — Mitchell’s draft position a year ago — the NBA TV crew asked the Jazz guard a question: Who is this year’s Donovan Mitchell?

    The Jazzman said he liked Jerome Robinson, the versatile scorer from Boston College, and Lonnie Walker IV, the Miami product who ended up being selected by the San Antonio Spurs at No. 19.

    “He has that factor,” Mitchell said of Walker. “Like, he’s quiet, but he’s a killer.”

    But, Mitchell added, he didn’t like making the comparisons.

    “To hear people say, ‘Who’s the next me?’ In my lifetime, it’s always been who’s the next LeBron [James]. It’s incredible. It’s a blessing. But I don’t like it, because it puts a lot of pressure on the rookie,” Mitchell said. “I’ve come to a point where I realize what I did this year was not normal. It took a while to realize that. I was blessed with an opportunity, certain situations, a team that believed in me from day one. Not all teams are like that.”

    And when the Jazz drafted Duke guard Grayson Allen with the 21st-overall pick, Mitchell interrupted Allen’s first interview to give his new teammate a hug.

    “We can do so many things,” Mitchell said. “Adding a guy like him — elite scorer, great guy, great defender who plays unselfish, we got a good one with him and we’re excited.”

    Chow Truck, Utah’s original food truck, shuts down

    Chow Truck, Utah’s original food truck, shuts down


    The food truck that launched Salt Lake City’s mobile eating scene eight years ago has closed. The Chow Truck’s demise was announced June 16 on Facebook by co-owners J. and Megan Looney. They attributed the closure to some “unforeseen mechanical...

    The food truck that launched Salt Lake City’s mobile eating scene eight years ago has closed.

    The Chow Truck’s demise was announced June 16 on Facebook by co-owners J. and Megan Looney. They attributed the closure to some “unforeseen mechanical problems” with the bright yellow truck with the fire-breathing dragon logo.

    “It’s a bittersweet thing,” J. Looney said. “We were going to sell the business at the end of the summer season. We wanted the name to carry on.”

    Paying for a major repair proved impossible.

    “Anyone who is in the business understands that our margins are razor thin; we lead a tenuous existence,” he said. “Any food truck owner is one mechanical failure away from shuttering their business.”

    The Looneys say they will continue to cater events through the Chow Truck name and their private chef company at www.chefjlooney.com.

    For many Utah diners, Chow Truck was their first food truck experience, and they were disappointed to hear about its closure.

    “You were my first food truck, and even now, my mouth waters for your tofu tacos,” said one Facebook commenter.

    Added another: “Amazing run, Chow! This is the end of an era, for sure”

    The closure does mark the end of an impressive eight-year run for a business that served tacos and sliders with an Asian twist.

    In 2010, well-known Utah restaurateur SuAn Chow launched the Chow Truck, exciting diners and blazing a culinary trail for others.

    It wasn’t easy. She had to fight archaic city regulations that barred the food truck from parking in one location for more than two hours at a time. She also couldn’t pull up to the curb — even if she fed the parking meters.

    “When I showed up on the scene, they didn’t know what to do with me,” Chow said in a telephone interview from Montana, where she now works.

    With tenacity and salesmanship — and help from sympathetic bureaucrats — the city changed the ordinance, allowing the Chow Truck, and the hundreds of other food trucks that followed, to roll more freely about the city.

    Other Utah communities mimicked that model when drafting ordinances of their own.

    “I had to convince them that this was not just a passing trend,” Chow said, noting that her business background and her ability to run the truck as a “restaurant on wheels” helped.

    “They felt that I was a solid model to work with,” she said, adding, “I am really proud to be part of that process.”

    “SuAn blazed the trail,” said J. Looney, who worked on the Chow Truck for several years before buying the business in 2015. “She made people comfortable with the idea, opening doors and building the reputation.”

    Since then, traveling restaurants have traversed Utah, specializing in everything from pizza and hamburgers to crêpes and rice bowls.

    Unlike taco carts and hot dog stands that are anchored in one location, food trucks move around, parking at malls, call centers, banks, college campuses, concert venues, festivals and fairs. Hungry diners find them by following them on Facebook, Twitter or a website.

    “Today, there are probably more than 300 food trucks operating in Utah,” said Taylor Harris, a founding partner of the Food Truck League, which coordinates food truck events and catering across the Wasatch Front.

    “The food truck scene has really grown,” he said, noting that there are trucks everywhere from Logan to Moab and St. George.

    But with the Chow Truck‘s exit, is there too much competition for trucks to be successful?

    “No,” J. Looney said. “There are tons of food trucks, but we are nowhere near saturation. The state could probably support 100 more trucks.”

    It has, however, lost the original.

    She pulls out books during social gatherings. When other teens did it at this Utah writing camp, she realized, ‘My gosh, there’s more of us.’

    She pulls out books during social gatherings. When other teens did it at this Utah writing camp, she realized, ‘My gosh, there’s more of us.’


    When 14-year-old Ellie Seegmiller walked into a room at Southern Utah University for writing camp last summer, it was full of what seemed like hundreds of kids. Her heart sank.“Oh, crap, I’m going to have to make friends and stuff,” she remembers...

    When 14-year-old Ellie Seegmiller walked into a room at Southern Utah University for writing camp last summer, it was full of what seemed like hundreds of kids. Her heart sank.

    “Oh, crap, I’m going to have to make friends and stuff,” she remembers thinking.

    Seegmiller, who’s written a book a year since she was in sixth grade, was excited about the chance to work with famous authors during the first-ever WriteOut camp. But she’d been picturing a classroom setting, sparsely populated with a few other kids from Cedar City.

    Instead, she says, the three-day camp was “one of the most phenomenal things that I’ve ever done.”

    It wasn’t just that she got better at writing, thanks to the hands-on mentoring from working authors like Ally Condie and Brandon Mull. She also formed friendships with and learned from kids who’d come from all over the country to hone their skills.

    “At school, if you write a bunch, if you like writing essays, if you write in your free time, people think it’s weird,” says Seegmiller, who drafts her books during downtime in class. “It was nice to meet people who their natural habitat was the same … people more like me who cared enough about their writing that they would give up going to a party to write.”

    Condie, who founded WriteOut, says she was surprised but pleased by the connections formed by attendees. Her goal was that the camp would be one of the coolest experiences these young aspiring writers would ever have — and then they’d go home.

    In the year since the inaugural camp, though, many kids have stayed in touch, exchanging story drafts over email and sharing tips about character development and plot. And Margaret Stohl — who co-wrote the best-selling “Beautiful Creatures” series — started a writing group with the 20 kids she’d mentored over the course of the camp.

    Stohl is returning for the 2018 event, set for June 27-29 at SUU. She and Ann Dee Ellis will be teaching a new advanced track for kids who attended the camp last year, or who may be further ahead in their writing path.

    Given last year’s enthusiasm, Condie expanded the camp to admit 125 students ages 13 through 18, up from 100. The number of author mentors also has increased, from five to seven, with Ally Carter (the Gallagher Girls series) and Soman Chainani (”The School for Good and Evil”) joining Brendan Reichs and Utah authors Mull, Condie, Stohl and Ellis.

    The camp’s basic format will remain the same. Writing workshops are interspersed with outings to the Utah Shakespeare Festival and Cedar Breaks National Monument. The campers are also given free time to explore SUU — whether that be in the computer lab, in the swimming pool or in yoga classes with Chainani.

    The nonprofit is still looking for a corporate sponsor, Condie says. Revenue from registration fees helps organizers break even, but they are all volunteering their time (including Ellie Seegmiller’s mother, Tasha Seegmiller, an SUU professor). Condie’s main goal is that eventually, she won’t have to worry each year whether it will be financially viable to put on the camp again.

    The pie-in-the-sky hope is to expand the camp to serve other rural areas — maybe in Idaho or Arizona — where children aren’t often exposed to the concept that writing can be a career.

    Nineteen-year-old McKenzie Allen, a bookworm practically since birth — memorizing the words of picture books before she could read — awakened to that concept when author Suzy Kline visited her Boston elementary school.

    “I finally put two and two together that people actually wrote books and they didn’t just appear magically in the library,” she says.

    Kline, who wrote 38 books in the “Horrible Harry” series, showed the students the first “book” she’d ever written, in the first grade. It was a simple story about a horse and a dog who were friends.

    Allen, then in second grade, realized, “Hey, I could do that” — which maybe meant that she, too, could someday be a published author.

    In middle school, she wrote a story about the (mostly fictional) adventures of the students in her grade. In her freshman year of high school, she wrote her first book — which she says she’ll never let anyone read.

    She learned last year at WriteOut that the important thing is to just keep writing. Reichs told her and the others in his group that the first draft of anything is always unlikable — but each draft improves.

    “WriteOut boosted my confidence with writing,” Allen says. “This something you can do if you work at it, and you put the time in, and you make an effort to make it part of your life. Everyone has good ideas. … What comes after is just a lot of work. Work and time and effort.”

    At 18, she was one of the oldest attendees and didn’t know anyone going in. Just three days later, she and many others were in tears as they said goodbye. They’d found their people, other kids who love writing, and reading, books — and talking about writing and reading books with other people who really get it.

    Allen recalls a day when a group of kids was sitting in the grass. It was quiet, and then someone pulled a book out of their bag. Then another person did, too. Then another. Allen pulled out her own book, slightly in awe — usually, she says, she’s the only one who’s reaching for a book during a social gathering. She remembers thinking: “My gosh, there’s more of us.”

    She won’t be returning to WriteOut this year — after three semesters at Utah State University, she’s back in Boston and planning to serve a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

    But after seeing how helpful and welcoming Allen and other campers were, Condie decided to make a counselor position for 19- and 20-year-olds. They’ll attend WriteOut for free — except lodging — while assisting authors and looking out for the younger kids during the hike and other activities.

    Ellie Seegmiller will be returning to WriteOut, taking a break from her summer odd jobs of babysitting, viola instruction and cotton-candy selling. Since last year’s camp, she’s filled two three-subject notebooks with another novel.

    Finding the words to fill the pages has never been a problem, she says, but the quality has improved thanks to the coaching she got from Ellis last year.

    “I knew all the different scenes I wanted to have, I just didn’t know how to get from one scene to the next … without giving the reader whiplash,” Seegmiller says.

    Ellis gave her some tips and techniques for moving smoothly between scenes and introducing characters and their backgrounds.

    “It was really more advanced than the grammar stuff that you get in school,” Seegmiller says.

    Not all of her friends she made last year are returning, but she’s not worried. No matter who’s at WriteOut, they’ll have plenty to talk about. Or maybe just sit quietly and write. That works, too.

    WriteOut
    June 27-29
    Southern Utah University
    $250
    For more info or to volunteer: WriteOutCamp.org

    Performers take Utah Arts Festival to the next level — quite literally

    Performers take Utah Arts Festival to the next level — quite literally


    The Utah Arts Festival kicked off Thursday with creations of all kinds, including vertical dance by Bandaloop, paintings by Darrell Driver, leatherwork by Alice Dave and sculptures by Malen Pierson.The event continues through Sunday at Library and...

    The Utah Arts Festival kicked off Thursday with creations of all kinds, including vertical dance by Bandaloop, paintings by Darrell Driver, leatherwork by Alice Dave and sculptures by Malen Pierson.

    The event continues through Sunday at Library and Washington squares in Salt Lake City.

    Whom are the Jazz taking at 21? Here are the best guesses from around the NBA.


    No one yet knows whom the Utah Jazz will be taking in the first round of the NBA Draft, but many people have opinions.The Tribune released its own mock draft with the Jazz taking Chandler Hutchison from Boise State 21st overall. Around the country,...

    No one yet knows whom the Utah Jazz will be taking in the first round of the NBA Draft, but many people have opinions.

    The Tribune released its own mock draft with the Jazz taking Chandler Hutchison from Boise State 21st overall. Around the country, others are weighing in with how they see the Jazz using the No. 21 pick (assuming the Jazz don’t trade up or down).

    There’s a clubhouse favorite — by now, you’ve probably heard his name once or twice:

    USA Today: Kevin Huerter, SG/SF, 6-foot-7, Maryland • “There’s a lot to like about the smooth-shooting forward. He moves extremely well without the ball, is comfortable attacking on his own and has a sound 3-point stroke that should translate well to the NBA.”

    ESPN: Troy Brown Jr., SG/SF, 6-foot-7, Oregon • “He’s one of the youngest players in this class and consistently described as an outstanding teammate and worker. Helping him become a better shooter will be a major key for whichever team drafts him.” (ESPN also has a “Perfect Picks” draft that selects Aaron Holiday out of UCLA, but is based more on fit.)

    CBS Sports: Keita Bates-Diop, SF/PF, 6-foot-7, Ohio State • “Bates-Diop projects as an athletic three-and-D player who will be ready to contribute on day one. He can do a bit of everything on the court and ought to make a nice role player — and can succeed immediately. He measured with an incredibly long wingspan (7-3 ¼) at the combine, which will only help his draft stock.”

    NBA.com: Moritz Wagner, 6-foot-10, PF, Michigan • “He’s a tailor-made modern day big, who’s been a dynamic three-point shooter the last two years (39 percent as a sophomore and a junior) while also being able to put the ball on the deck and get to the rim. … Wagner would be a very different kind of big than Derrick Favors, but he’d be a solid insurance policy for Utah with Favors one of the few quality bigs available in free agency this summer.”

    The Athletic: Kevin Huerter, SG/SF, 6-foot-7, Maryland • “Teams have come away impressed during interviews, which ultimately played a role in them seeing him worthy of a first-round pick. He fits a lot of what Utah looks for in wing prospects, and would make a lot of sense here.”

    Sports Illustrated: De’Anthony Melton, PG/SG, 6-foot-3, USC • “He’s best paired off the ball alongside a creative guard, with long arms, active hands and a knack for forcing mistakes on the defensive end. His presence would take some responsibility away from Donovan Mitchell and enable the Jazz to try different looks in the backcourt, provided Melton’s improved three-point stroke holds up.”

    The Ringer: Kevin Huerter, SG/SF, 6-foot-7, Maryland • “Excellent spot-up shooter with deep range. No one in the draft is better at hitting off-balance jumpers off screens.”

    The Sporting News: Elie Okobo, PG, 6-foot-3, Pau (France) • “In Utah, he would offer head coach Quin Snyder a number of diverse backcourt looks and potentially pair well with Donovan Mitchell over the long-term. The Jazz certainly still need to add shot creators.”

    NBADraft.net: Kevin Huerter, SG/SF, 6-foot-7, Maryland • “Huerter is a smart, skilled playmaker that offers a nice versatile package that NBA teams look for in today’s game. … Huerter’s biggest selling point is his ability to shoot the ball from the perimeter and space the floor.”

    Bleacher Report: Elie Okobo, PG, 6-foot-3, Pau (France) • “Okobo has been working out for teams in the United States following his breakout season in France’s top league that included a potential needle-moving 44-point effort in late May. An exciting ball-screen playmaker and proven shot-maker from all over, Okobo is now a first-round name to watch for teams looking to upgrade their point guard position.”

    ABC orders ‘Roseanne’ spinoff for fall — minus Roseanne Barr


    Los Angeles • ABC, which canceled its “Roseanne” revival over its star’s racist tweet, said Thursday it will air a Conner family sitcom minus Roseanne Barr this fall.ABC ordered 10 episodes of the spinoff after Barr agreed to forgo any creative...

    Los Angeles • ABC, which canceled its “Roseanne” revival over its star’s racist tweet, said Thursday it will air a Conner family sitcom minus Roseanne Barr this fall.

    ABC ordered 10 episodes of the spinoff after Barr agreed to forgo any creative or financial participation in it, which the network had said was a condition of such a series.

    In a statement issued by the show’s producer, Barr said she agreed to the settlement to save the jobs of 200 cast and crew members who were idled when “Roseanne” was canceled last month.

    “I regret the circumstances that have caused me to be removed from ‘Roseanne,’ she said, adding, “I wish the best for everyone involved.”

    The revival of the hit 1988-97 sitcom “Roseanne” was swiftly axed by ABC last month after Barr posted a tweet likening former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to a product of the Muslim Brotherhood and “Planet of the Apes.”

    Tom Werner, executive producer of the original series and the revival, said in the statement that he was grateful to reach the deal to keep the team working “as we continue to explore stories of the Conner family.”

    ABC said that the new series, with “The Conners” as its working title, will star John Goodman, Laurie Metcalf, Sara Gilbert and other “Roseanne” cast members.

    How Barr’s character, the family matriarch, will be erased from their life was left unexplained for now by ABC.

    “After a sudden turn of events, the Conners are forced to face the daily struggles of life in Lanford in a way they never have before,” the network said in its announcement.

    “The spinoff will continue to portray contemporary issues that are as relevant today as they were 30 years ago,” ABC said, a nod to the show’s unusual portrayal of a blue-collar family.

    The new show was ordered from producer Werner Entertainment without a pilot episode, the typical basis for a series to be greenlit.

    Barr’s tweet had been condemned by ABC Entertainment President Channing Dungey as “abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values.”

    Barr initially apologized and deleted the post, which had followed her pattern of making controversial statements on social media. Some observers questioned why ABC had ordered the revival given her history.

    But the comedy’s return was an instant smash for ABC, owned by the Walt Disney Co., and was counted on to lead the network’s fortunes next season.

    Its first new episode last March was seen by more than 25 million people, with delayed viewing counted in, numbers that are increasingly rare in network television.

    How it will happen: The Tribune’s NBA mock draft with the Jazz at No. 21 picking ...


    Here’s how The Tribune’s Tony Jones sees the NBA Draft going on Thursday night in New York.1. Phoenix Suns: Deandre Ayton, center, ArizonaYou can make the argument for Luka Doncic, or even Mo Bamba. But Ayton is dynamic for a center in all parts of...

    Here’s how The Tribune’s Tony Jones sees the NBA Draft going on Thursday night in New York.

    1. Phoenix Suns: Deandre Ayton, center, Arizona

    You can make the argument for Luka Doncic, or even Mo Bamba. But Ayton is dynamic for a center in all parts of the game. He represents a significant need for the Suns and new head coach Igor Kokoskov.

    2. Sacramento Kings: Marvin Bagley III, forward, Duke

    Bagley is a safe pick, which is what the Kings need. He’s going to average 20 points and 10 rebounds through the bulk of his career. Will he be a superstar? Maybe not. The Kings can’t afford to miss, and they won’t miss with Bagley. He’s a great value at No. 2.

    3. Atlanta Hawks: Luka Doncic, guard, Slovenia

    He’s the best pure player in the draft, and one of the most celebrated international players ever. Doncic can play three positions, is incredibly cerebral, is a great passer and has great size. He will kickstart Atlanta’s rebuilding effort.

    4. Memphis Grizzlies: Jaren Jackson Jr., forward, Michigan State

    He fits the new-age NBA big man perfectly. Jackson has a ridiculous defensive ceiling and is a potential 40 percent 3-point shooter on offense. He can guard three spots and is close to 7 feet tall. If he gets stronger, look out. His upside is Kevin Garnett level.

    5. Dallas Mavericks: Mo Bamba, center, Texas

    The Rudy Gobert comparisons — at least physically — are apt. Bamba has a terrific wingspan and athleticism. He projects to be an elite rim protector and can do good things offensively. After drafting their point guard of the future last season in Dennis Smith Jr., the Mavericks get their big man of the future.

    6. Orlando Magic: Wendell Carter, forward, Duke

    A candidate to average 20 points and 10 rebounds per game in his career, Carter probably won’t miss, but may not have as high a ceiling as others do. He will be able to play power forward or center in the NBA. He’s an elite rebounder and has proven chops as a low block scorer. A safe pick for a team that can’t afford to miss.

    7. Chicago Bulls: Michael Porter, forward, Missouri

    Had he been healthy, he could’ve been the top pick of this draft. Porter can be an elite scorer. He’s 6-foot-11 and can play three positions. He missed almost all his freshman season with a back injury, and there is concern there. If he’s healthy, he’s a steal at this point.

    8. Cleveland Cavaliers: Kevin Knox, forward, Kentucky

    This comes with a caveat that the Cavs may trade this pick for a veteran in a last-ditch attempt to keep LeBron James. If they don’t make a move, Knox is a good rebuilding point. He’s young for his class, extremely athletic, and has a high upside.

    9. N.Y. Knicks: Trae Young, guard, Oklahoma

    The Knicks should go safe and pick Mikal Bridges. But with Young available, the bet here is they won’t be able to resist the lure of a potential fan favorite. Young will be able to score, but can he defend? And whom can he defend at his size? At the very least, he’s an exciting talent.

    10. Philadelphia 76ers: Mikal Bridges, forward, Villanova

    With Young off the board, the Sixers take the best 3-and-D wing the draft has seen in recent years. Bridges fits perfectly with the Sixers. He would be an immediate candidate for rotation minutes.

    11. Charlotte Hornets: Collin Sexton, guard, Alabama

    This shapes perfectly for the Hornets. They want to trade Kemba Walker, which means Sexton is a natural fit as the point guard of the future. Sexton is a bulldog defensively, and very athletic and strong. He would be a fan favorite right away.

    12. L.A. Clippers: Robert Williams, forward, Texas A&M

    With DeAndre Jordan’s future with the Clippers in doubt, Los Angeles takes the best rim-running big man remaining on the board. Williams can play both frontcourt spots. He’s an exceptional athlete and a rim protector.

    13. L.A. Clippers: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, guard, Kentucky

    The Clippers may want to deal one of their picks. If they keep this one, Gilgeous-Alexander would be a nice developmental piece, with Pat Beverley coming off surgery and Milos Teodosic closer to the end of his career than the beginning.

    14. Denver Nuggets: Jerome Robinson, guard, Boston College

    With Will Barton being a restricted free agent, the Nuggets take Robinson, who can be a bucket-getter coming off their bench. He also fits with Denver’s scheme of perimeter players who can make shots around Nikola Jokic.

    15. Washington Wizards: Zhaire Smith, guard, Texas Tech

    Smith may be the best pound-for-pound athlete in the draft. He has a lot of skill development to do to reach his ceiling. But, if his skillset catches up to his athleticism, he could become a star.

    16. Phoenix Suns: Miles Bridges, forward, Michigan State

    Bridges accomplishes two things: He’s the best player remaining on the board, and he gives the Suns a much-needed option as a stretch power forward. He’s a plus athlete and a good shooter.

    17. Milwaukee Bucks: Elie Okobo, guard, France

    Eric Bledsoe may be on the outs in Milwaukee. And even if Bledsoe isn’t, the Bucks need a backcourt guy who can score like Okobo. He’s fast and fearless and athletic. He’s a great shooter and can create offense.

    18. San Antonio Spurs: Keita Bates-Diop, forward, Ohio State

    The most Spurs selection ever would be to take Diop, who was a four-year, do-it-all guy at Ohio State. Diop measured 6-foot-8½ at the combine and can play either forward position.

    19. Atlanta Hawks: Aaron Holiday, guard, UCLA

    Holiday would be a terrific selection for the Hawks as a point guard who can score and defend. He has a great wingspan, which would help him defensively. Holiday is the brother of Jrue and Justin Holiday, both solid NBA players.

    20. Minnesota Timberwolves: Troy Brown, guard, Oregon

    Brown gives the Wolves an intriguing option who can play and guard three spots. He’s probably not ready to play right away, but he has significant upside at 18 years old.

    21. Utah Jazz: Chandler Hutchison, guard, Boise State

    The Jazz sorely need a third scorer, and Hutchison can score with the best of them in this draft. He can make shots at all three levels, and he’s mature at 22 years old. He could be an instant rotation guy.

    22. Chicago Bulls: Lonnie Walker, guard, Miami

    Walker is dynamic and has upside. This is probably a little lower than projected, but he’s great value in the early 20s.

    23. Indiana Pacers: Mitchell Robinson, center, Western Kentucky

    In time, Robinson could be one of the best rim protectors in the league. He didn’t play college basketball — he enrolled at Western Kentucky, withdrew from school within a month, then re-enrolled and declared for the draft — but is an intriguing prospect.

    24. Portland Trail Blazers: Kevin Huerter, guard, Maryland

    Huerter is one of the best pure shooters in the draft and can do some damage off the dribble as well. Portland needs more shooting, especially on its second unit.

    25. L.A. Lakers: Donte DiVincenzo, guard, Villanova

    Another great value pick. He’s one of the best athletes in the draft and comes from a terrific program.

    26. Philadelphia 76ers: Grayson Allen, guard, Duke

    The Sixers are probably going to lose JJ Redick in free agency, and Allen is a nice replacement. He can shoot, he’s a good athlete and he’s a competitor.

    27. Boston Celtics: Jacob Evans, guard, Cincinnati

    The Celtics fell in love with Evans, a tough and hard-nosed wing, during the pre-draft process. He’s a good second-unit fit here for the Celtics.

    28. Golden State Warriors: Anfernee Simons, guard, IMG Academy

    The Warriors can afford to draft for potential, and Simons has a ton of upside. He’s an offensively gifted wing who can shoot and get to the basket off the dribble.

    29. Brooklyn Nets: Jalen Brunson, guard, Villanova

    The Nets may lose Spencer Dinwiddie to free agency after next season. If that happens, Brunson could be ready to step in right away.

    30. Atlanta Hawks: Omari Spellman, forward, Villanova

    An athletic big man who can shoot, Spellman adds to Atlanta’s frontcourt depth.

    Countries should take in as many refugees as they can, Pope Francis says


    Aboard the papal plane • Pope Francis urged nations Thursday to take in as many refugees as they can integrate into their societies and to invest in places like Africa so migrants won’t turn to human traffickers to reach countries that can offer a...

    Aboard the papal plane • Pope Francis urged nations Thursday to take in as many refugees as they can integrate into their societies and to invest in places like Africa so migrants won’t turn to human traffickers to reach countries that can offer a better life.

    Speaking to reporters on his airplane as he flew back to Rome after a visit to Geneva, Francis also reiterated that he supports the Roman Catholic bishops in the United States who condemned the immigration policy of separating children from parents who enter the U.S. illegally.

    “I am behind what the bishops say,” the pope said, referring to the leadership of the U.S. bishops conference denouncing the separations as ‘’immoral.”

    On Wednesday, U.S. President Donald Trump reversed a policy of separating immigrant children from their parents after being detained entering the United States without permission.

    Francis was asked both about the separation policy as well as Europe’s struggle with a flood of migrants rescued in the Mediterranean from human traffickers’ boats. Italy’s new populist government is trying to discourage more arrivals of rescued migrants.

    He praised Italy and Greece for being “most generous” in taking in migrants rescued at sea and said all governments should take in as many refugees as their countries can handle.

    “Each country must do this with the virtue of government, which is prudence, and take in as many refugees as it can, as many as it can integrate, educate, give jobs to,” said Francis, who for years has urged nations to be more welcoming to those fleeing war and poverty. “We are living through a flood of refugees who are fleeing war and hunger” as well as persecution,

    Francis endorsed European proposals to develop jobs and education in African countries. Italy and some other European Union nations that have borne the brunt of the migrant crisis have been pushing for more development aid to Africa so poor people there won’t risk their lives in the hands of traffickers in hopes of reaching Europe and a better life.

    “So many European governments are thinking of an urgent plan to intelligently invest in those countries, to give jobs and education,” Francis said.

    He noted that in Latin America, including his own homeland of Argentina, many people migrate internally, leaving the countryside for big cities, only to end up living in shantytowns.

    The pope also expressed deep dismay that migrants on smuggler boats are turned back in Libyan waters, returning them to lawless Libya, where traffickers are based and where desperate migrants are thrown in prisons to face torture and other abuse.

    “The traffickers’ prisons are terrible, terrible, like the concentration camps of World War II,” Francis said.

    Francis’ trip to Geneva was aimed at promoting unity among Christians, including by concretely working together for peace and justice in the world.

    The Supreme Court cleared the way for Utah to collect sales taxes from all online sales. Here’s what it means for consumers and businesses


    Utahns will soon start paying the taxes they already owed but almost never paid after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of states that require online businesses to collect sales taxes on Thursday.That means that about $285 million in sales taxes that...

    Utahns will soon start paying the taxes they already owed but almost never paid after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of states that require online businesses to collect sales taxes on Thursday.

    That means that about $285 million in sales taxes that the state expected would be owed but not paid will soon be collected at checkout while shopping online — if lawmakers act to do so.

    The court overturned its 1992 ruling and opened the door for states to pass laws that require businesses making online sales – rather than consumers – to be in charge of collecting sales taxes and handing them over to the state.

    That’s as it should be, says Rep. Steve Eliason, a Republican and accountant from Sandy who chairs the House Revenue and Taxation Committee. People were already supposed to pay taxes on their online purchases if the business didn’t do it for them, but about 1 percent of them did, he said.

    “Taxes are complex enough,” Eliason said. “But to literally keep track of what you buy and what rate [was more difficult]. It’ll be much easier for taxpayer compliance.”

    The court found its 26-year-old ruling in a North Dakota case “unsound and incorrect,” and upheld a South Dakota law requiring businesses with over $100,000 in annual sales or over 200 sales a year to collect state sales taxes.

    Utah was already preparing for the change, which will be a boon for big manufacturing companies. That’s because the state Legislature already passed a bill that commits nearly a third of the projected windfall to a manufacturing tax break.

    On the final day of the legislative session in March, the House approved a bill that created an $83 million tax break for large manufacturing and mining companies in the event the long-awaited high court ruling came down in favor of states. The companies will no longer have to pay sales taxes on certain business-related purchases, thanks to SB233.

    The Utah Taxpayers Association, whose president, Sen. Howard Stephenson, long advocated for the tax break, heralded the court’s ruling.

    “For too long out-of-state online retailers have had the upper hand over our local, in-state stores,” Billy Hesterman, the group’s vice president, wrote in a statement. “This ruling now levels the playing field and allows the market to pick the winners and not an antiquated tax law.”

    Utah cut a deal last year under which the nation’s biggest online retailer, Amazon, had voluntarily begun collecting state sales tax from its Utah customers. Those taxes are collected on direct Amazon sales, not ones it handles from third party retailers.

    State officials have been mum about how much that boosted revenue, but in an early attempt to gauge the impact based on overall tax collections, The Tribune estimated Amazon-related revenue was around $32 million to the state and another $14 million to local governments.

    Utah lawmakers are already gearing up for a possible special session to tweak the state tax code to adjust for changes made last year by Congress. It’s not clear whether the Legislature will also add a requirement for online sales taxes if it does meet again this year.

    “We’re going to be looking carefully at it because we want there to be a reasonable and easily administered process for online collection,” said Sen. Curt Bramble, a Provo accountant and Republican who sits on the Senate’s tax committee.

    Bramble said he spoke with John Valentine, chairman of the Utah State Tax Commission, after the ruling was issued on Thursday and that he believes the Legislature would wait until its regular session next year to adjust the tax code as a result of the ruling.

    The ruling excited Jens Nielsen, owner of Pictureline in Salt Lake City, who said customers flocked to online retailers knowing they’d save money if the business didn’t collect sales tax.

    “We would be twice if not three times as large of a company in Salt Lake if there was a fair and even sales tax,” Nielsen said. “Obviously I’m excited about it because we’re going to grow from this.”

    And while businesses will watch for changes at the state level, at least one online behemoth in Utah is calling for Congress to change the tax code.

    “Though the impact of the court’s ruling today will be clarified by further proceedings in the lower court, we are prepared to comply with any outcome,” Jonathan Johnson, president of Overstock.com subsidiary Medici Ventures, said in a written statement.

    Overstock and Johnson have been among the most vocal opponents of online sales taxes.

    Still, Johnson said, “The decision will have no appreciable impact on our business.”

    The company’s stock fell 7 percent shortly after the court handed down its 5-4 ruling.

    “Unless Congress responds, the Court’s ruling may remove key entrepreneurial opportunities before they even get out of the heads of the inventors,” Johnson added.

    Upset Holladay residents want to stop the development of the old Cottonwood Mall site, says plan calls for too many apartments

    Upset Holladay residents want to stop the development of the old Cottonwood Mall site, says plan calls for too many apartments


    A group of Holladay residents is trying to put the brakes on a major development on the site of the old Cottonwood Mall — a plan these residents say will concentrate too many people in not enough space without boosting the city’s economy.“It would...

    A group of Holladay residents is trying to put the brakes on a major development on the site of the old Cottonwood Mall — a plan these residents say will concentrate too many people in not enough space without boosting the city’s economy.

    “It would be great if Holladay residents have a voice in the matter,” said Brett Stohlton, one of the organizers of Unite for Holladay, which is collecting signatures for a referendum that could stop a development plan approved last month by Holladay’s mayor and five-member City Council.

    “It’s a bigger issue than just six people,” Stohlton said.

    The plan, approved May 17, could transform the 57 acres where the mall once stood into a busy city center. The mixed-use plan, developed by Ivory Homes and the Woodbury Corp., would boasts a high-rise apartment complex with an estimated 775 units — which Stohlton said would make it the largest apartment block in Salt Lake County.

    The plan also includes 79 single-family homes, 50 to 70 luxury condominiums, 22 brownstones and 39 manor houses, as well as office space, and between 20 and 40 retail stores and restaurants.

    “It feels like the city is being sold a lot of high density that’s not in character with the history and vision of Holladay,” said Stohlton, who works for a private equity firm, “and we’re getting a poor economic outcome out of it.”

    Holladay Mayor Rob Dahle argued that city leaders approved a plan that “struck a fair balance with all the parties involved and would speak to a successful future for that site.”

    The plan approved in May, Dahle said, was a compromise after a larger plan — which included 236 more residential units, and a 136-foot-high tower — was rejected by the city Planning Commission last year.

    “We’ve spent hundreds of hours, numerous town hall meetings, five or six public hearings, on this,” Dahle said. “This has been out in the public for seven months.”

    Dahle also said the plan is in keeping with what used to be on the site before it became a flat piece of dirt in 2007.

    “There was a mall on that site for 55 years that was blacktop and buildings and no trees, that generated over double the traffic that this site is projected to generate,” Dahle said. “This site was never designed to be this quaint little rural development.”

    Stohlton also said the city is giving the Ivory/Woodbury consortium too much of the tax revenues the new development would generate, under a process called tax-increment financing. Dahle countered that the city will still get some $3 million in tax revenue over the next two decades, even after the developers get their share, which is more than the zero dollars the site is generating now.

    The requirements to get a referendum on the ballot are steep. Stohlton’s group must collect 5,874 signatures — 35 percent of the people who voted in the past presidential election — before July 12. Stohlton estimated the group is about a third of the way toward that goal.

    Such protests are becoming a trend along the Wasatch Front. Orem residents mounted a petition drive this spring in an effort to block a student-housing project near Utah Valley University. And reaction from Herriman residents recently prodded Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams to veto the Olympia Hills development project.

    Utah teen accused in high school backpack bomb scare was bullied, expert says


    St. George • A Utah teenager accused of trying to blow up a homemade backpack bomb after looking at Islamic State propaganda online had been bullied and didn’t understand the severity of his actions, a psychologist testified in his court trial...

    St. George • A Utah teenager accused of trying to blow up a homemade backpack bomb after looking at Islamic State propaganda online had been bullied and didn’t understand the severity of his actions, a psychologist testified in his court trial Wednesday.

    Clinical psychologist Tim Kockler said the teen may have wanted to cause the same kind of fear at school that he had experienced himself.

    The 16-year-old “experienced a lifetime history of bullying,” Kockler said, according to the Spectrum newspaper in St. George.

    Kockler said he had diagnosed the teen as high-functioning on the autism spectrum and having borderline intellectual functioning, which affected his ability to understand the consequences of his actions on other people.

    “There’s a disconnect between his reality and what’s going on presently,” Kockler said.

    The Associated Press is not naming the defendant because he’s a minor.

    He was charged with attempted murder and other counts in March after authorities found the smoking but inert backpack at a high school in St. George.

    He told police in an interview recorded the day the backpack was found that he tried to blow it up to cause fear.

    “They’re going to think I’m crazy,” he said in a portion of the video shown in court Wednesday. A detective had requested that the teenager write down what happened that day.

    In footage of the interview previously shown in court, the teenager had said he expected the bomb to go off and didn’t see anything bad about death.

    The teen is also accused of cutting up an American flag and replacing it with a spray-painted flag resembling that of the Islamic State at a different high school in the nearby town of Hurricane in February. He also spray-painted words including “ISIS” on a wall at that school, authorities said.

    Prosecutors want to try the teenager as an adult, but the defense has fought the effort.

    The hearing continues Monday.

    As Utah’s housing crisis worsens, business leaders launch a campaign to change public sentiment


    Amid widening evidence that Utah’s affordable housing crunch is worsening, business and community leaders met Thursday in Salt Lake City for the first of several “big tent” meetings to address the problem.The Salt Lake Chamber is launching a major...

    Amid widening evidence that Utah’s affordable housing crunch is worsening, business and community leaders met Thursday in Salt Lake City for the first of several “big tent” meetings to address the problem.

    The Salt Lake Chamber is launching a major public-awareness campaign meant to highlight dramatically rising home prices, shrinking affordability and a historic gap in Utah between the number of households and available housing units. That deficit is now estimated at about 250,000 homes.

    Derek Miller, chamber president and CEO, called the housing shortage “one of the greatest challenges we face.” Failing to address it, he said, threatens Utah’s quality of life and its record-breaking economic growth.

    “People are getting squeezed out,” added Abby Osborne, the chamber’s vice president of public policy and government affairs.

    In the first of a series of quarterly meetings, the chamber gathered nearly 200 elected officials, developers, bankers, professional planners, media specialists and housing advocates Thursday in hopes of getting their support for what has been dubbed the Housing Gap Coalition.

    As part of the campaign, chamber officials plan a multipronged advertising and social-media blitz, and they aim to visit every city council in Utah to convey the urgency of the problem. They are also pushing for the adoption of more zoning ordinances that allow a mix of housing types, including options like apartments and condos, as well as a streamlining of cost-prohibitive permitting and impact fees levied at the local level.

    On hand at the chamber’s downtown Salt Lake City offices Thursday was a stunning review of several decadeslong trends that have pushed Utah’s home prices to record levels and constrained supplies of existing homes, apartments and new construction.

    Median home prices in Utah have soared in just a generation, swelling from $125,000 in 1991 to $347,000 today. Without action, several officials warned, housing prices in Utah’s urban centers will be comparable to those in San Francisco, where the median price is at $700,000 or above, in nine years.

    Housing prices in Salt Lake County are roughly 20 percent higher than competing urban markets, such as Boise and Phoenix. Vacancy rates, meanwhile, are at historic lows across the Wasatch Front — even as apartments are being built in historic numbers — and, with wages not keeping up, one in every eight families is now spending half or more of its income on housing.

    The latest numbers also show fair-market rents for apartments in Utah’s capital city moving further out of reach of blue-collar and many middle-class residents, with the average two-bedroom unit going for $1,035 per month. Paying that without having to sacrifice on other budget basics like food or health care requires earning $19.90 an hour, advocates say — nearly three times Utah’s minimum wage.

    Statewide, the same apartment costs $925 a month, according to a report from the Washington, D.C.-based National Low Income Housing Coalition.

    “There needs to be a thoughtful dialogue and discussion on what these communities are going to look like, how they’re going to address and absorb some of the population growth that’s coming, in a responsible manner,” said Osborne. “But, really, turning our back on it is just not acceptable to us.”

    Debates over housing and density in Utah have turned political in recent years, with a host of mayoral and city council races hinging on disputes over new development. That has ratcheted up further of late, with controversies over high-density projects such as Olympia Hills in southwest Salt Lake County and a redevelopment project at the former Cottonwood Mall site in Holladay.

    Much of the problem centers on public perceptions of density in housing and development. Several elected officials highlighted suspicions among some of their residents that allowing apartments, town homes, condos and even single-family homes on smaller lots will damage their neighborhoods, boost crime, snarl traffic and burden public resources.

    That sentiment, in turn, often brings intense pressure on city leaders from residents who oppose new housing options in their communities, said Cameron Diehl, executive director of Utah League of Cities and Towns.

    Utah is expected to add another 2 million people by 2050 to the 3 million who live here already. Too few Utahns realize that most of that growth stems from the state’s higher-than-average birthrate, not outsiders flooding in, said Diehl. He mentioned the “cognitive dissonance” of some residents “who have six kids but don’t want anyone moving to their city.”

    Diehl said the chamber’s media campaign will dovetail well with new efforts by the league to equip locally elected leaders with key tools and advice for crafting their zoning, land use and housing policies.

    “We applaud this effort,” he said.

    Robert Grow, CEO of the regional planning group Envision Utah, urged that the publicity campaign and other outreach efforts be nuanced, with different targeted messages to reach those with varying sentiments about growth.

    Polling in 1991, Grow noted, found that about 85 percent of Utahns supported growth in the state, with 15 percent opposed. In 2016, 42 percent of residents surveyed backed more growth, with 37 percent opposed and the rest undecided.

    “We are at a tipping point where if we aggressively frighten Utahns about what growth is doing to housing, we may shut down the housing,” Grow said. “We may see a lot of people slam the doors on growth.”

    He and others urged advertising that emphasized offering solutions. “We’re Utahns,” Grow said. “We solve problems. ... Let’s ride that curve with really good messaging.”

    On a roll in Russia, Mexico begs World Cup fans to not use homophobic chant


    Rostov-on-Don, Russia • Mexico’s biggest worry at the World Cup may be its fans instead of its next opponent, struggling South Korea.The Mexican football federation was fined 10,000 Swiss francs ($10,000) and warned of further sanctions over a chant...

    Rostov-on-Don, Russia • Mexico’s biggest worry at the World Cup may be its fans instead of its next opponent, struggling South Korea.

    The Mexican football federation was fined 10,000 Swiss francs ($10,000) and warned of further sanctions over a chant by supporters considered to be homophobic during the opening game against Germany. Fans in Mexico use the chant to insult opposing goalkeepers as they take a goal kick. Widely considered a slur, some argue there is no discriminatory intent.

    As traveling Mexican fans prepare to descend on this southern Russian city, players and the federation are imploring them not to repeat it at Saturday’s match, in messages on television and social media. The Group F game will be attended by South Korean President Moon Jae-in.

    “For the Mexican fan, the World Cup is a party. You can see it on the street the whole time. But at the stadium, fans should stop the chant, or modify it, or change it all together. It would be better for everyone,” Mexican federation general secretary Guillermo Cantu said.

    FIFA had warned the federation, he said, that supporters identified as chanting the slur could have their Fan IDs canceled.

    “The rules have been there since the tournament started, so in the end, it’s our responsibility.”

    The team arrived in Rostov late Thursday and was greeted by a small group of fans outside their hotel.

    The Mexicans have reached the last 16 in their six previous World Cups, and are on course to make it seven after beating Germany 1-0. Javier Hernandez tore past defenders and found Hirving Lozano for a stylish goal in the 35th minute.

    Coach Juan Carlos Osorio is a fan of reshuffling his lineup — a tactic inspired by former Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson — but is likely to stick to many of his opening game starters, relying on his back four to stop the pacey Koreans.

    Celebrations in Mexico City of the goal against Germany were so rowdy that seismologists checked reports of an artificial earthquake. It was eventually ruled out.

    But Mexico midfielder Marco Fabian was one of several players who warned against complacency.

    “We reached our first target and have beaten Germany, but we can’t sit back,” Fabian said. “Some consider us to be group favorites now, and that’s a compliment — but it’s one we shouldn’t believe. There are no favorites in this World Cup.”

    The Koreans, stung by their 1-0 defeat by Sweden, could reconsider their attacking 4-3-3 formation that provided little threat and handed space to their opponents.

    Midfielder Koo Ja-cheol, who plays at Bundesliga club Augsburg, said players were studying Mexico on their tablets and had identified Hernandez as the major threat.

    “Of course we are not ready to give up. Everyone put in so much effort to get here,” Koo said. “What we want is to turn fans’ disappointment into joy.”

    More AP World Cup coverage: www.apnews.com/tag/WorldCup

    Charles Krauthammer, prominent conservative voice, has died


    New York • Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and pundit who helped shape and occasionally dissented from the conservative movement as he evolved from “Great Society” Democrat to Iraq War cheerleader to denouncer of Donald...

    New York • Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and pundit who helped shape and occasionally dissented from the conservative movement as he evolved from “Great Society” Democrat to Iraq War cheerleader to denouncer of Donald Trump, died Thursday.

    He was 68.

    His death was announced by two organizations that employed him, Fox News Channel and The Washington Post.

    Krauthammer had said publicly a year ago he was being treated for a cancerous tumor in his abdomen and earlier this month revealed that he likely had just weeks to live.

    “I leave this life with no regrets,” Krauthammer wrote in The Washington Post, where his column had run since 1984. “It was a wonderful life — full and complete with the great loves and great endeavors that make it worth living. I am sad to leave, but I leave with the knowledge that I lived the life that I intended.”

    Sometimes scornful, sometimes reflective, he was awarded a Pulitzer in 1987 for “his witty and insightful” commentary and was an influential voice among Republicans, whether through his syndicated column or his appearances on Fox News Channel. He was most associated with Brit Hume’s nightly newscast and stayed with it when Bret Baier took over in 2009.

    Krauthammer is credited with coining the term “The Reagan Doctrine” for President Reagan’s policy of aiding anti-Communist movements worldwide. He was a leading advocate for the Iraq War and a prominent critic of President Barack Obama, whom he praised for his “first-class intellect and first-class temperament” and denounced for having a “highly suspect” character.

    Krauthammer was a former Harvard medical student who graduated even after he was paralyzed from the neck down because of a diving board accident, continuing his studies from his hospital bed. He was a Democrat in his youth and his political engagement dated back to 1976, when he handed out leaflets for Henry Jackson’s unsuccessful presidential campaign.

    But through the 1980s and beyond, Krauthammer followed a journey akin to such neo-conservative predecessors as Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, turning against his old party on foreign and domestic issues. He aligned with Republicans on everything from confrontation with the Soviet Union to rejection of the “Great Society” programs enacted during the 1960s.

    “As I became convinced of the practical and theoretical defects of the social-democratic tendencies of my youth, it was but a short distance to a philosophy of restrained, free-market governance that gave more space and place to the individual and to the civil society that stands between citizen and state,” he wrote in the introduction to “Things That Matter,” a million-selling compilation of his writings published in 2013.

    For the Post, Time magazine, The New Republic and other publications, Krauthammer wrote on a wide range of subjects, and in “Things That Matter” listed chess, baseball, “the innocence of dogs” and “the cunning of cats” among his passions. As a psychiatrist in the 1970s, he did groundbreaking research on bipolar disorder.

    But he found nothing could live apart from government and the civic realm. “Science, medicine, art, poetry, architecture” and other fields were “fundamentally subordinate. In the end, they must bow to the sovereignty of politics.”

    Ever blunt in his criticisms, Krauthammer was an “intense disliker” the liberal columnist E.J. Dionne told Politico in 2009. And opponents had words for him. Christopher Hitchens once called him the “newest of the neocon mini-windbags,” with the “arduous job, in an arduous time, of being an unpredictable conformist.”

    He was attacked for his politics, and for his predictions. He was so confident of quick success in Iraq he initially labeled the 2003 invasion “The Three Week War” and defended the conflict for years. He also backed the George W. Bush administration’s use of torture as an “uncontrolled experiment” carried out “sometimes clumsily, sometimes cruelly, indeed, sometimes wrongly. But successfully. It kept us safe.” He was sure that Obama would lose in 2008 because of lingering fears from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, and foresaw Mitt Romney defeating him in 2012.

    But he prided himself on his rejection of orthodoxy and took on Republicans, too, observing during a Fox special in 2013 that “If you’re going to leave the medical profession because you think you have something to say, you betray your whole life if you don’t say what you think and if you don’t say it honestly and bluntly.”

    He criticized the death penalty and rejected intelligent design as “today’s tarted-up version of creationism.” In 2005, he was widely cited as a key factor in convincing Bush to rescind the Supreme Court nomination of the president’s friend and legal adviser Harriet Miers, whom Krauthammer and others said lacked the necessary credentials. And he differed with such Fox commentators as Bill O’Reilly and Laura Ingraham as he found himself among the increasingly isolated “Never Trumpers,” Republicans regarding the real estate baron and former “Apprentice” star as a vulgarian unfit for the presidency.

    “I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully,” he wrote in August 2016, around the time Trump officially became the Republican nominee. “I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him.”

    Trump, of course, tweeted about Krauthammer, who “pretends to be a smart guy, but if you look at his record, he isn’t. A dummy who is on too many Fox shows. An overrated clown!”

    Krauthammer married Robyn Trethewey, an artist and former attorney, in 1974. They had a son, Daniel, who also became a columnist and commentator.

    The son of Jewish immigrants from Europe, Krauthammer was born in New York City and moved with his family to Montreal when he was 5, growing up in a French speaking home. His path to political writing was unexpected. First, at McGill University, he became editor in chief of the student newspaper after his predecessor was ousted over what Krauthammer called his “mindless, humorless Maoism.”

    In the late 1970s, while a psychiatric resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, a professor with whom he had researched manic depression was appointed to a mental health agency created by President Jimmy Carter. Krauthammer went, too, began writing for The New Republic and was soon recruited to write speeches for Carter’s vice president and 1980 running mate, Walter Mondale.

    Carter was defeated by Reagan and on Jan. 20, 1981, Reagan’s inauguration day, Krauthammer formally joined The New Republic as a writer and editor.

    “These quite fantastic twists and turns have given me a profound respect for serendipity,” he wrote in 2013. “A long forgotten, utterly trivial student council fight brought me to journalism. A moment of adolescent anger led me to the impulsive decision to quit political studies and enroll in medical school. A decade later, a random presidential appointment having nothing to do with me brought me to a place where my writing and public career could begin.

    “When a young journalist asks me today, ‘How do I get to a nationally syndicated columnist?’ I have my answer: ‘First, go to medical school.’”

    ____

    AP Television Writer David Bauder contributed to this report.

    Another mystery at Big Ed’s: Sign was swiped from eatery near the University of Utah


    Big Ed’s iconic red, white and blue sign is missing.Thieves peeled the round marker off the brown brick, said Joren Peterson, who owns the building at 210 S. University St. “It’s unfortunate that someone decided they needed it.”Peterson hopes the...

    Big Ed’s iconic red, white and blue sign is missing.

    Thieves peeled the round marker off the brown brick, said Joren Peterson, who owns the building at 210 S. University St. “It’s unfortunate that someone decided they needed it.”

    Peterson hopes the theft — which occurred several months ago but was posted on social media Thursday — was just a prank by one of the nearby fraternities at the University of Utah and that a good Samaritan will return it soon.

    “I’m sure it’s hanging in someone’s room right now,” he said. “It would be great to get it back.”

    The sign’s disappearance is one more mystery surrounding Big Ed’s — a hole-in-the-wall restaurant beloved by U. students since 1968.

    One day last September, the mother and son who operated the breakfast, beer and burger joint placed a “Sorry Restaurant Closed” sign on the front door without an explanation.

    Peterson said he has not heard from the operators since.

    The building is currently being remodeled to make way for a new coffee shop called Publik Ed’s. It will be the fourth store for Salt Lake City’s Publik Coffee Roasters.

    Peterson said the new tenant had hoped to showcase the iconic sign when the shop opens in July.

    Karen Tumulty: The weakness of Donald Trump’s cruelty

    Karen Tumulty: The weakness of Donald Trump’s cruelty


    It is fitting that President Donald Trump has been forced into retreat by babies. Cruelty should never be mistaken for strength.Trump’s own confusion on that point was evident on Wednesday, as he announced that he would be taking executive action to...

    It is fitting that President Donald Trump has been forced into retreat by babies. Cruelty should never be mistaken for strength.

    Trump’s own confusion on that point was evident on Wednesday, as he announced that he would be taking executive action to undo his own policy of separating migrant children from their families.

    “The dilemma is that if you’re weak, if you’re weak, which some people would like you to be, if you’re really, really, pathetically weak, the country is going to be overrun with millions of people,” the president sputtered. “And if you’re strong, then you don’t have any heart.”

    His reversal exposed the papier-mache quality of the image that Trump has so carefully crafted for himself.

    The extreme tactic of separating parents from their children was in keeping with many other things that Trump has advocated to make himself look strong and tough: banning Muslims, building a wall on the border, punishing women who have abortions, killing the families of suspected terrorists, bringing back waterboarding as an interrogation method.

    What was different this time was that he followed through — until the outrage began to rise. Then, doing what spineless people typically do, Trump tried to deflect and distract from the truth that Americans could see in the images of children in cages, and hear in the recorded sounds of their wails.

    He made the baseless claim that Democrats were responsible for his own brutal policy, and then insisted that only Congress could change it. He argued that traumatizing babies was necessary to prevent MS-13 gang members from entering the country. He contended that adding judges to handle the staggering immigration caseload would breed graft and corruption. He invented statistics about crime in Germany that he said was driven by migrants.

    Dubbing as “tender age shelters” the facilities in which the administration was placing toddlers and babies was a euphemism worthy of Mao.

    None of that — not the blame-shifting or the fear-mongering, not the straw men or the flat-out lying — has made it any easier to stomach the tragedy that Trump perpetrated on the U.S.-Mexico border.

    What Trump has done is without precedent or basis in law, no matter how much he tries to gaslight the country into thinking otherwise.

    Polls have shown that two-thirds of Americans oppose pulling children from their parents, of making them tiny hostages so that Trump can gain leverage to build his border wall.

    The panic on Capitol Hill became palpable, even among some of the president’s most reliable allies.

    “The way it’s being handled right now isn’t acceptable. It’s not American,” Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, said this week. “I think we’ve got to do whatever it takes to try and keep families together.”

    Maybe there are reasons to hope that this nightmare has awakened some Republicans to the fact that they can actually stand up to the president who has taken control of their party and try to stop him as he continues to hijack conservatism.

    Still, don’t look for that kind of courage in the House, where Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., has said he is putting forward a “compromise” to fix the border problem. It would give the president pretty much everything he has asked for. The speaker is bowing to Trump’s ransom demand.

    It’s in the Senate that we might see an actual rebuke to Trump.

    One of the signs is the about-face of Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who only last week was arguing: “When you see reporters, when you see Democrats saying, ‘Don’t separate kids from their parents,’ what they’re really saying is don’t arrest illegal aliens.”

    By Tuesday, he had joined the resistance to Trump’s policy, though he stopped short of criticizing the president himself. “All of us are horrified at the images we’re seeing,” Cruz said, as he pushed for legislation to stop the separations.

    The fact that Cruz is up for re-election this year in a border state, against a surprisingly strong challenge by Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke, may have something to do with his change of heart.

    But it also may be that he and other Republicans are beginning to figure out something fundamental about a president who categorizes everyone as either strong or weak.

    If that is right, a grown man who holds the most powerful office in the world, and yet is capable of inflicting anguish on vulnerable children, clearly is one of the latter.

    Karen Tumulty is a Washington Post columnist covering national politics. She joined The Post in 2010 from Time magazine and has also worked at the Los Angeles Times.

    40,000 splake splash into Jordanelle Reservoir

    40,000 splake splash into Jordanelle Reservoir


    The Division of Wildlife Resources on Thursday introduced about 40,000 splake, a sterile cross between lake trout and brook trout, into the Jordanelle Reservoir.Measuring 4 to 5 inches long, splake will quickly grow and could reach adult lengths of more...

    The Division of Wildlife Resources on Thursday introduced about 40,000 splake, a sterile cross between lake trout and brook trout, into the Jordanelle Reservoir.

    Measuring 4 to 5 inches long, splake will quickly grow and could reach adult lengths of more than 2 feet long as part of ongoing management plans at the reservoir that currently holds numerous other fish species.

    Rep. Mia Love cast Utah’s only no vote on the House’s hardline immigration bill, which failed to pass


    Washington • Rep. Mia Love was the only House member from Utah to vote against a hardline immigration bill on Thursday and after the legislation failed, GOP leaders said they would postpone a vote on a compromise bill to give Republicans time to...

    Washington • Rep. Mia Love was the only House member from Utah to vote against a hardline immigration bill on Thursday and after the legislation failed, GOP leaders said they would postpone a vote on a compromise bill to give Republicans time to regroup.

    Love joined 40 fellow Republicans in voting against the bill by House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte that didn’t allow a path to legal residency for immigrants brought to America as children. It also contained several controversial enforcement measures.

    Utah Reps. Rob Bishop, John Curtis and Chris Stewart supported the bill, which failed 193-231 with all Democrats opposing it.

    House leaders had planned an evening vote on another immigration bill, one that would provide $25 billion for President Donald Trump’s border wall, offer a pathway to citizenship for young immigrants and ensure that families seeking asylum are not separated at the U.S.-Mexico border.

    But House Speaker Paul Ryan pushed off that vote and called the GOP conference to meet in the afternoon to gin up support for that measure.

    Love, in an impassioned speech on the House floor Thursday, pleaded for her colleagues to pass the compromise bill even as it’s fate was uncertain. She said it wasn’t a “perfect bill” but would make it easier for people to come to America legally.

    “It hits a sweet spot, allowing us to both follow the rule of law and show compassion to those who seek the freedom and blessings this country has to offer,” said Love, whose parents fled Haiti and later became U.S. citizens.

    Utah’s other members of Congress did not respond to requests for comment on the vote.

    E.J. Dionne: The lessons of Trump’s retreat

    E.J. Dionne: The lessons of Trump’s retreat


    Washington • The sweeping outrage over President Trump’s policy of separating immigrant children from their parents is a welcome sign of our nation’s moral and civic health. Ripping apart the family bond was too much even for some of Trump’s most...

    Washington • The sweeping outrage over President Trump’s policy of separating immigrant children from their parents is a welcome sign of our nation’s moral and civic health. Ripping apart the family bond was too much even for some of Trump’s most fervent apologists to take.

    In the end, Trump had to back off, a remarkable retreat on an issue pivotal to his political rise. Yet even as he reversed course, he did not admit to lying when he said last Friday that an executive order could not accomplish what he now proposes to accomplish with an executive order. He also appears ready to pick a new fight over whether children would be detained indefinitely.

    We have a right to celebrate those who pushed for this first step away from inhumanity.

    Civic and religious groups who have dedicated themselves to immigrant rights are unsung heroes of our moment. It’s encouraging that their work finally gained traction with the larger public. Politicians who spoke up quickly and forcefully — Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., was one of the earliest elected officials to move this issue to the fore — deserve credit.

    Journalists documented the administration���s systematic cruelty and dishonesty. Pictures and audio of suffering kids still have the power to awaken consciences.

    But this triumph will be short-lived if its lessons and the obstacles ahead are ignored.

    Trump’s stream of lies blaming an outrage perpetrated by his own administration on Democrats inspired the media to acknowledge the special problems posed in covering a president for whom deceit is central to his communications strategy.

    It makes little sense, as The Washington Post’s Margaret Sullivan argued this week, to report on this regime using the old rules. Something very different and decidedly insidious is going on. Will this lesson stick and influence coverage going forward?

    Trump has often relied on vicious assaults against his critics and adversaries to alter the political playing field and to pressure public institutions to bend to his will.

    One obvious conclusion from the recent Justice Department inspector general’s report is that former FBI Director James Comey was so fearful of a GOP backlash that he broke all protocols by publicly disparaging Hillary Clinton on her use of a private email server even as he was announcing that she wouldn’t be prosecuted. And he hit her again 11 days prior to the election when he wrote to Congress about the discovery of “new” emails that turned out to be either duplicates or personal.

    Thus did a major institution of our government fold to bullying and intimidation. Trump is counting on this happening again with special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe. Will this game be called out for what it is, or will it be allowed to work once more?

    Then there is the matter of the Republican Party. True, the exceptional egregiousness of tearing kids away from their parents led more Republicans than usual to speak out against Trump. But many remained silent, knowing how much control Trump exercises over the rank-and-file.

    It should shame the GOP that polls released this week by both CNN and Quinnipiac found that while two-thirds of all Americans opposed Trump’s family separation policy, Republicans supported it (by 58 percent to 34 percent in the CNN survey, and by 55 percent to 35 percent in Quinnipiac’s).

    Trump’s power is enhanced, paradoxically, by the shrinking of the Republican Party. This was underscored in a recent paper by Pablo Montagnes, Zachary Peskowitz and Joshua McCrain of Emory University.

    An analysis of Gallup numbers for me by Peskowitz showed a decline in the proportion of Americans who call themselves Republican, from 32.7 percent before the 2016 election to 28.6 percent in its surveys from late May to mid-June.

    The defections mean that those who still identify with the party will keep granting Trump high approval numbers. These, in turn, will continue to serve as a deterrent against criticism from its timid politicians. Only overwhelming public revulsion loosened their tongues this time.

    And conservatives need to confront a deep contradiction in their behavior. They tout their support for family values and small government. But Trump is far from the only conservative politician to ignore the interests of family life and to use government’s power oppressively where immigrants and other subordinate groups are concerned.

    It’s tempting to see this episode as the first act in the unraveling of the Trump presidency. But the fact that it took such an extraordinary set of circumstances to bring this disgraceful moment to an end tells us how difficult the remaining struggle will be.

    E.J. Dionne writes about politics in a twice-weekly column and on the PostPartisan blog. He is a government professor at Georgetown University, a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution and a frequent commentator on politics for National Public Radio and MSNBC. He is most recently a co-author of “One Nation After Trump.” [email protected] Twitter: @EJDionne

    Governor orders probe of abuse claims by immigrant children


    Washington • Virginia’s governor ordered state officials Thursday to investigate abuse claims by children at an immigration detention facility who said they were beaten while handcuffed and locked up for long periods in solitary confinement, left...

    Washington • Virginia’s governor ordered state officials Thursday to investigate abuse claims by children at an immigration detention facility who said they were beaten while handcuffed and locked up for long periods in solitary confinement, left nude and shivering in concrete cells.

    Gov. Ralph Northam, a Democrat, announced the probe in a tweet hours after The Associated Press reported the allegations. They were included in a federal civil rights lawsuit with a half-dozen sworn statements from Latino youths held for months or years at the Shenandoah Valley Juvenile Center near Staunton, Virginia. The AP report also cited an adult who saw bruises and broken bones the children said were caused by guards.

    Multiple detainees as young as 14 said guards stripped them of their clothes and strapped them to chairs with bags placed over their heads. The incidents described in the lawsuit occurred from 2015 to 2018, during both the Obama and Trump administrations.

    “Whenever they used to restrain me and put me in the chair, they would handcuff me,” said a Honduran immigrant who was sent to the facility when he was 15 years old. “They also put a bag over your head.”

    In addition to the children’s first-hand, translated accounts in court filings, a former child-development specialist who worked inside the facility told the AP she saw kids there with bruises and broken bones they blamed on guards. She spoke on condition of anonymity because she was not authorized to publicly discuss the children’s cases.

    In court filings, lawyers for the detention facility have denied all allegations of physical abuse. In his announcement Thursday, Virginia’s governor directed the state’s secretary of public safety and homeland security and the Department of Juvenile Justice to report back to him.

    Following AP’s reporting, Virginia’s two Democratic senators said Thursday they will seek to investigate conditions inside the Shenandoah facility.

    In a tweet, Sen. Tim Kaine said: “Deeply troubled by this report. We need answers on what happened at this facility, and my staff and I are going to demand them.”

    Sen. Mark Warner said he wants to visit the detention center and inspect conditions.

    House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte, a Republican whose home district includes the Shenandoah facility, said he was unaware of any complaints prior to the AP’s reporting. An architect of the current effort by GOP conservatives to pass tougher restrictions on legal immigration, Goodlatte called the abuse allegations alarming and said they “certainly merit a thorough investigation to uncover the truth.”

    Many of the children were sent there after U.S. immigration authorities accused them of belonging to violent gangs, including MS-13. President Donald Trump has repeatedly cited gang activity as justification for his crackdown on illegal immigration.

    But Kelsey Wong, a program director at the facility, said during a recent congressional hearing that in many cases the children did not appear to be gang members and were suffering from mental health issues.

    The Shenandoah lockup is one of only three juvenile detention facilities in the United States with federal contracts to provide “secure placement” for children who had problems at less restrictive housing. It was built by a coalition of seven nearby towns and counties to lock up local kids charged with serious crimes.

    Since 2007, about half the 58 beds are occupied by both male and female immigrants between the ages of 12 and 17 facing deportation proceedings. Though incarcerated in a facility similar to a prison, the immigrant children have not yet been convicted of any crime.

    On average, 92 immigrant children each year cycle through Shenandoah, most of them from Mexico and Central America.

    The lawsuit filed against Shenandoah recounted the story of an unnamed 17-year-old Mexican citizen apprehended at the southern border. The teen fled an abusive father and violence fueled by drug cartels to seek asylum in the United States in 2015.

    After stops at facilities in Texas and New York, he was transferred to Shenandoah in April 2016 and diagnosed during an initial screening by a psychologist with three mental disorders, including depression. The lawsuit alleged the teen received no further significant mental health treatment.

    The lawsuit described violent incidents between Latino children and staff at the Shenandoah center. It described guards as mostly white, non-Spanish speakers who were undertrained in dealing with individuals with mental illness.

    In sworn statements, teens reported spending the bulk of their days locked in their cells, with a few hours set aside for classroom instruction, recreation and meals. Some said they had never been allowed outdoors.

    The lawsuit said poor conditions and verbal abuse by staff often escalated into physical confrontations, as frustrated children acted out. The staff regularly responded by “applying an excessive amount of force that goes far beyond what is needed to establish or regain control.”

    In the case of the Mexican 17-year-old, the lawsuit said a staff member who suspected him of possessing contraband threw him to the ground and forcibly tore off his clothes for an impromptu strip search. Though no forbidden items were found, the teenager was transferred to a unit designated for children who engage in bad behavior.

    The lawsuit said Latino children were frequently punished by being restrained for hours in chairs, with handcuffs and cloth shackles on their legs. Often, the lawsuit alleged, the children were beaten by staff while bound.

    As a result of such “malicious and sadistic applications of force,” the immigrant youths have “sustained significant injuries, both physical and psychological,” the lawsuit said.

    After being subjected to such treatment, the 17-year-old Mexican youth said he tried to kill himself in August, only to be punished with further isolation. On other occasions, he said, he cut his wrists with a piece of glass.

    The lawsuit alleges other immigrant youths held at Shenandoah have also engaged in cutting and other self-harming behaviors, including ingesting shampoo and attempting to choke themselves.

    A hearing in the case is set for July 3 before a federal judge in the Western District of Virginia.

    ___

    Pearson reported from New York and Burke reported from San Francisco.

    Chinese Olympic figure skating judges banned for bias; Nathan Chen could have finished fourth if not for the judges


    While the overhaul of figure skating’s international judging system in 2004 has gone a long way toward bringing integrity to a largely subjective process, it is not perfect.Four months after the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, two Chinese judges have been...

    While the overhaul of figure skating’s international judging system in 2004 has gone a long way toward bringing integrity to a largely subjective process, it is not perfect.

    Four months after the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, two Chinese judges have been suspended by the International Skating Union for giving “preferential marking” to skaters from their country.

    The sanctions and rationale behind the them were explicated in detail in an ISU report issued earlier this week, and they represent an embarrassment to China in the run-up to the 2022 Winter Games, which will be hosted by Beijing.

    One of the Chinese judges, Chen Weiguang, has been banned for two years and will not be allowed to serve as a judge for the 2022 Beijing Games. The other judge, Huang Feng, has been banned for one year.

    In the case of Chen, she gave her highest marks for execution and second-highest marks for component scores in the men’s competition to Chinese skater Jin Boyang, who finished fourth. Her scores were so markedly different from those of the other eight judges on the panel that it triggered scrutiny after the fact.

    After an inquiry, the ISU concluded that Chen’s marks were “completely unrealistic,” according to the report, which stated: “There is evidence of preference for the Chinese skater and prejudice against his strongest competitors.

    As detailed in the report, Chen awarded Jin 20 points for execution of his short program, scoring six elements with a “plus-three,” while none of her fellow judges did so. Her marks were similarly out of line with those of other judges for component scores; in three separate components, she gave Jim 9.5 out of 10, while her fellow judges gave 8.5 on average.

    Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu and Shoma Uno won gold and silver, respectively, while Spain’s Javier Fernandez claimed bronze. Jin placed fourth, edging Salt Lake City star Nathan Chen by a fraction of a point (297.77 to 297.35). Chen finished fifth.

    The U.S. Figure Skating Association has not commented on the suspension.

    In the case of Huang, who judged the pairs competition, the ISU review concluded that he “obviously favored” the Chinese pair of Wenjing Sui and Cong Han, who took the silver medal, over other competitors.

    The ISU review noted inflated scores for the Chinese pair and deflated scores for the eventual gold medalists, Aljona Savchenko and Bruno Massot of Germany, and the Canadian bronze medalists, Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford.

    Finishing fourth was Evegenia Tarasova and Vladimir Morozov, representing Olympic Athletes from Russia. The lone American pair, husband-and-wife Alexa and Chris Knierem, were a distant 15th.

    Figure skating radically overhauled its scoring system in response to a judging scandal at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics, where French and Russian judges were found to have conspired to help a Russian duo win the pairs competition. Ultimately two gold medals were awarded — to the original victors from Russia, Elena Berezhnaya and Anton Sikharulidze, and the Canadian duo of Jamie Sale and David Pelletier, who initially took silver. Under the new system, skaters receive two sets of marks — execution and component scores, which reflect skating skill, transitions, performance, composition and interpretation.

    It wasn’t the first time Huang had drawn scrutiny for his marks. Two months before the 2018 Olympics, the ISU warned Huang about biased judging at the December 2017 Grand Prix Final pairs event.

    Both judges may appeal their suspensions to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

    Dana Milbank: Trump says trade wars are ‘easy.’ Here come the first American casualties.

    Dana Milbank: Trump says trade wars are ‘easy.’ Here come the first American casualties.


    Washington • President Trump believes that “trade wars are good, and easy to win.” So he started one.Now the casualties are beginning to return home from the battlefield, and on Capitol Hill Wednesday, the people’s representatives presented some...

    Washington • President Trump believes that “trade wars are good, and easy to win.” So he started one.

    Now the casualties are beginning to return home from the battlefield, and on Capitol Hill Wednesday, the people’s representatives presented some of them to Wilbur Ross, the president’s billionaire commerce secretary.

    “Corn, wheat, beef and pork are all suffering market price declines … due to current trade policies,” complained Sen. John Thune (S.D.). “With every passing day, the United States loses market share to other countries.”

    From Pennsylvania, Sen. Patrick J. Toomey cautioned that Kraft-Heinz may move its ketchup production to Canada to avoid retaliatory tariffs.

    Sen. Johnny Isakson (Ga.) put in a plea over Coca-Cola’s rising aluminum can costs.

    Sen. Orrin G. Hatch of Utah warned that contracts have dried up for a steel fabricator in his state because of the tariffs, and “multibillion-dollar investments for new manufacturing plants that employ thousands of workers are also being put at risk.”

    And those were just the Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee.

    Ross, 80, wears eyeglasses and a hearing aid, but he didn’t need either to see and feel the bipartisan anger, and the fear among Republicans, about the damage Trump’s incipient trade war is already doing to steel users, seafood businesses, cherry and potato farmers, ranchers, uranium producers, newsprint users, brewers — you name it. Even lawmakers sympathetic to Trump’s aim of cracking down on China were aghast at the clumsy way the policy is being administered, the cumbersome exemption process, and the bizarre justifications of the policy that declare Canada a national-security risk but give favorable treatment to a Chinese company accused of espionage against the United States.

    Trade war is hell. But the plutocratic commerce secretary was not troubled. Ross’ answer to the senators’ pleas for their constituents: Let them eat cake.

    When Thune warned that the drop in soybean prices (caused by China’s retaliatory tariffs) was costing South Dakota soybean farmers hundreds of millions of dollars, Ross responded by saying he heard the price drop “has been exaggerated.”

    When the committee’s ranking Democrat, Sen. Ron Wyden (Ore.), told Ross the administration is woefully behind in granting exemptions, Ross said Wyden would learn otherwise if he did his “homework.”

    Ross told Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) that he’s heard the rising cost of newsprint for rural newspapers “is a very trivial thing,” and he told Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin (D-Md.) that it’s tough luck if small businesses don’t have lawyers to apply for exemptions: “It’s not our fault if people file late.”

    Asked by Sen. Michael F. Bennet (D-Colo.) what the administration would do to help American farmers and ranchers, Ross told him “I’m not in detail familiar with all of the tools” and let the senator know that “we have no control over what another country does in retaliation.”

    Ross further claimed to the lawmakers that the huge spike in steel prices “is not a result of the tariff” but of “antisocial behavior by participants in the industry” — behavior triggered by the tariffs. He justified tariffs on Canadian steel for national-security reasons, though the United States has a steel-trade surplus with Canada, by saying the concern is about transshipments of Chinese steel through Canada — yet he admitted “we do not have definitive data” about such shipments.

    The cavalier performance — much like when he held a can of Campbell’s soup on TV and asked “who in the world is going to be bothered” by an increase in steel prices for the can — did not play well.

    “The car isn’t a can of soup. It’s not a can of soup, Mr. Secretary,” said Hatch.

    Toomey told Ross that “we’re picking winners and losers and probably resulting, in my view, in the risk of far more jobs lost than jobs are going to be gained.”

    But what does Ross care? He’s a winner. Forbes reported on the eve of the hearing that, for most of last year, he maintained stakes in companies co-owned by the Chinese government, a shipping firm tied to Russian President Vladimir Putin (Ross shorted the company’s stock right before his connection to the business was reported last fall) and a bank reportedly caught up in the investigation being conducted by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

    Asked whether he believed, as several of the senators did, that the United States is in a trade war, Ross was breezy: “As the president has often said, we’ve been at a trade war forever. The difference is that now our troops are coming to the ramparts.”

    And they are beginning to take heavy casualties.

    Twitter, @Milbank.

    Messi, Argentina on verge of elimination after 3-0 loss to Croatia at World Cup


    Nizhny Novgorod, Russia • Lionel Messi and his Argentina teammates are on the verge of World Cup elimination. Croatia is moving on.Argentina was handily beaten by Croatia 3-0, a loss that makes advancement very difficult with only one group match...

    Nizhny Novgorod, Russia • Lionel Messi and his Argentina teammates are on the verge of World Cup elimination. Croatia is moving on.

    Argentina was handily beaten by Croatia 3-0, a loss that makes advancement very difficult with only one group match remaining. It was Argentina’s worst loss in group play in 60 years.

    Messi, who turns 31 on Sunday, failed to get even one shot off against Croatia on Thursday, five days after he missed a penalty in the team’s opening 1-1 draw against Iceland.

    Croatia frustrated Argentina throughout the match and never gave Messi space to operate.

    The humiliating loss came in humiliating fashion for one of soccer’s most storied nations.

    Argentina goalkeeper Wilfredo Caballero miss-kicked a clearance and Croatia defender Ante Rebic recovered the ball before sending it into the net in the 53rd minute.

    Luka Modric scored another with a hooking shot in the 80th and Ivan Rakitic added the third in stoppage time.

    Croatia advanced to the round of 16 with six points from two games in Group D. Argentina has only one point and will next face Nigeria on Tuesday in St. Petersburg.

    Argentina has won two World Cups — the last in 1986 — but has not won any major title in 25 years. It lost the World Cup final to Germany four years ago in Brazil.

    It worst loss in group play came in a 6-1 defeat against Czechoslovakia in 1958.

    Croatia, a 1998 World Cup semifinalist, reached the knockout stage for only the second time.

    Australia gets crucial tie with Denmark

    Samara, Russia • Mile Jedinak’s penalty kick gave Australia a 1-1 draw against Denmark on Thursday and new life at the World Cup.

    Christian Eriksen scored in the opening minutes for Denmark, which has gone unbeaten in 17 straight international matches. But Jussuf Poulsen’s handball after a video review set up Jedinak’s opportunity in the 38th minute.

    Going into the tournament, No. 36 Australia was the lowest-ranked team in Group C with the others all in the top 12.

    With a loss to France in the opener, a defeat Thursday would have made it nearly impossible for the Socceroos to advance to the next stage. Denmark, meanwhile, won its first match against Peru.

    Mbappe sends France into 2nd round with win over Peru

    Yekaterinburg, Russia • Kylian Mbappe’s first World Cup goal put France into the round of 16.

    The teenage forward tapped in a ball headed toward goal in the 34th minute to give France a 1-0 victory over Peru on Thursday.

    At 19 years and 183 days, Mbappe became the youngest scorer in France’s World Cup history.

    With two wins from two matches in Group C, France is through to the next round with a match to spare while Peru has been eliminated.

    France coach Didier Deschamps made a pair of tactical adjustments after an underwhelming performance in the team’s opening win over Australia. He put Blaise Matuidi and Olivier Giroud in the starting lineup but kept his same 4-3-2-1 formation with Giroud out front.

    Both used their speed and passing to expose gaps in Peru’s backline.

    Melania Trump dons ‘I really don’t care, do u?’ jacket


    Washington • First lady Melania Trump wore a jacket that read “I really don’t care, do u?” as she boarded a flight Thursday to a facility housing migrant children separated from their parents.The green, hooded military jacket had the words...

    Washington • First lady Melania Trump wore a jacket that read “I really don’t care, do u?” as she boarded a flight Thursday to a facility housing migrant children separated from their parents.

    The green, hooded military jacket had the words written graffiti-style on the back.

    When asked what message the first lady’s jacket intends to send, spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham said: “It’s a jacket. There was no hidden message. After today’s important visit to Texas, I hope the media isn’t going to choose to focus on her wardrobe. ”

    Grisham underscored that message in a tweet with the hashtags #SheCares and #ItsJustAJacket.

    Mrs. Trump changed into a pale yellow jacket before the plane landed in McAllen, Texas, for a visit to the Upbring New Hope Children’s Center, which houses 55 migrant children.

    The youthful jacket sharply contrasts with the first lady’s typically bold, foreign-flavored wardrobe. In public appearances, the first lady has worn designs by Dolce & Gabbana, Del Pozo, Christian Dior, Emilio Pucci, Givenchy and Valentino, often with daringly high Christian Louboutin heels.

    This week in Mormon Land: ‘Believing Christ’ author Stephen Robinson, who preached the beauty of grace, dies; church speaks out on border separations; bishops’ interviews amplified

    This week in Mormon Land: ‘Believing Christ’ author Stephen Robinson, who preached the beauty of grace, dies; church speaks out on border separations; bishops’ interviews amplified


    The Mormon Land newsletter is a weekly highlight reel of developments in and about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, whether heralded in headlines, preached from the pulpit or buzzed about on the back benches. Want Mormon Land in your...

    The Mormon Land newsletter is a weekly highlight reel of developments in and about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, whether heralded in headlines, preached from the pulpit or buzzed about on the back benches. Want Mormon Land in your inbox? Subscribe here.

    This week’s podcast: Songs for the saints

    For years, this has been a standard Mormon refrain: When will a new hymnbook come out?

    Well, ring out, wild bells, that blessed day is approaching.

    The LDS Church announced that it is developing a new, one-size-fits-all hymnal — along with a revised children’s songbook — for Mormons across the globe.

    So which hymns should stay? Which should go? And which new ones should be added?

    Writer Kristine Haglund, a former editor of Dialogue and a self-professed “serious amateur” singer and musician, discusses those questions and the vital role music plays in LDS life in the latest “Mormon Land” podcast.

    Listen here.

    ‘Believing Christ’ author dies

    His landmark 1992 book helped many a Mormon to believe in hope, believe in grace, believe in Christ. And, more to the point, to believe Christ.

    Stephen E. Robinson, longtime religion professor at LDS Church-owned Brigham Young University, died June 17.

    He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from BYU and a doctorate from Duke. He taught back East before returning to teach at BYU and rose to head of the school’s department of ancient scripture.

    Robinson taught and mentored thousands of students, but he forever will be remembered most for his book “Believing Christ: The Parable of the Bicycle and Other Good News.”

    It marked the “first significant turn that Latter-day Saints took toward grace,” historian-theologian Janiece Johnson, a former Robinson student, writes in a tribute cross-posted at By Common Consent and BYU’s Neal A. Maxwell Institute. “Many have built on it, but Robinson’s work was the foundation.”

    It set the stage for, among others, Robert L. Millet’s “Grace Works,” Brad Wilcox’s “Continuous Atonement” and Sheri Dew’s “Amazed by Grace” as more and more LDS leaders, scholars and authors picked up the grace gauntlet.

    “To have faith in Jesus Christ is not merely to believe that he is who he says he is. It is not merely to believe in Christ; we must also believe Christ,” Robinson wrote in the church’s Ensign magazine in 1992. Believe that he can heal, help, save and exalt.

    Robinson’s book, Johnson explains, “was the first time I actually began to recognize that no matter how much I worked, I could not earn God’s grace. I had to choose to receive the gift, and only then could it change me.”

    After taking classes from Robinson, Johnson, a research associate at the Maxwell Institute, credits him with starting her on a “path to recognize that the intellectual and the spiritual did not have to clash.”

    “There would be tension, but a symbiotic relationship was possible,” she writes. “He also helped me recognize that discipleship means sometimes asking hard questions and leaping into the darkness, but it is always worth it.”

    Robinson was 71.

    Speaking (and writing) of Christ ...

    Adam Miller, whose “Letters to a Young Mormon” struck a chord with Latter-day Saints of all ages when it hit the shelves five years ago, has a new book out.

    “An Early Resurrection: Life in Christ Before You Die” challenges Mormons to “live in Christ.”

    “How can we let ourselves and our own desires die,” says a description from publisher Deseret Book, “so we can be born again to a new life, a full life in Christ, here and now in this mortal life?”

    Questions and answers

    Should Mormon bishops let LDS teens know what they are going to ask them in “worthiness" interviews before they actually conduct these one-on-one chats?

    The answer to that question is an emphatic yes.

    The governing First Presidency issued a letter instructing bishops to ensure that “youth and parents are aware of the topics and questions covered in these interviews” before their first sit-downs.

    And, for the first time, the church published the 13 questions youths are to be asked when seeking limited-use temple recommends. The queries include:

    • “Do you sustain the president of [the LDS Church] as the prophet, seer and revelator?”

    • “Do you live the law of chastity?”

    • “Are you a full-tithe payer?”

    • “Do you keep the Word of Wisdom?”

    • “Do you support any group or person whose teachings oppose those accepted by [the LDS Church]?”

    Families can be together … at the border

    In its second public pronouncement on a hot-button immigration issue since Russell M. Nelson assumed the faith’s reins five months ago, the LDS Church said it was “deeply troubled” by the forced separation of parents from their children at the U.S.-Mexico border.

    The news release said the “aggressive and insensitive” treatment was “harmful to families, especially to young children,” and urged national leaders to swiftly correct these actions and pursue “rational, compassionate solutions.”

    In January, the church urged Congress to act quickly to protect from deportation hundreds of thousands of “Dreamers,” whose undocumented parents brought them to the United States as children, and to provide them with “hope and opportunities.”

    Dr. Nelson, we presume

    The current Mormon prophet’s influence as a heart surgeon is still being felt 34 years after his call to the apostleship.

    His alma mater, the University of Utah, recently established the Russell M. Nelson and Dantzel W. Nelson Presidential Chair in Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    Nelson was part of a research team that developed the heart-lung machine that made possible the first human open-heart surgery in 1951. Four years later, he performed Utah’s first open-heart surgery.

    He has credited his first wife, Dantzel, who died in 2005, with helping him in his groundbreaking medical pursuits.

    “I am confident that the continuing work and research at the University of Utah will bring credit to this great institution,” Nelson said in a news release. “We have a new [U.] president, Ruth V. Watkins, and we have a great department chairman in surgery, Samuel Finlayson, and we have a wonderful leader in charge of the cardiothoracic program, Dr. Craig Selzman.”

    Selzman, the first recipient of the newly endowed chair, said his academic division is “worthy of taking this name, living up to this name, maintaining this name and driving forth the legacy of this name.”

    “Forever moving forward,” he added in the release, “the values and principles of Dr. Nelson will be ingrained in all of those that join our division, that live in our division, work for our department and work for our university.”

    Gov. Gary Herbert and the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative recently recognized Nelson with a lifetime achievement award as part of the annual Governor’s Medals for Science and Technology.

    Mesa makeover pits new vs. old

    The LDS Church’s remake of its historic temple in Mesa, Ariz., and its plans to build a mixed-use development nearby — at the expense of seven 1940s homes — are still stoking debate.

    “I am not against redevelopment. I think there’s a way to marry old and new,’’ Janice Gennevois, vice chairwoman of the city’s Historic Preservation Board, said in the East Valley Tribune. “It’s our duty not to lose historic properties. Once they are gone, we can never get them back.”

    Negotiations are continuing.

    Quote of the week

    “The forced separation of children from their parents now occurring at the U.S.-Mexico border is harmful to families, especially to young children. We are deeply troubled by the aggressive and insensitive treatment of these families. While we recognize the right of all nations to enforce their laws and secure their borders, we encourage our national leaders to take swift action to correct this situation and seek for rational, compassionate solutions.”
    LDS Church statement on June 18

    Mormon Land is a weekly newsletter written by David Noyce and Peggy Fletcher Stack. Subscribe here.

    Holly Richardson: If you’ve been silent on what’s happening to immigrant children, you can’t call yourself pro-life or pro-family

    Holly Richardson: If you’ve been silent on what’s happening to immigrant children, you can’t call yourself pro-life or pro-family


    In Romania in the early 1990s, the world saw children warehoused in orphanages, crowded in spaces that were too small, without enough people to care for them. Some even had cages.The world was outraged, and rightly so. No child should be warehoused. No...

    In Romania in the early 1990s, the world saw children warehoused in orphanages, crowded in spaces that were too small, without enough people to care for them. Some even had cages.

    The world was outraged, and rightly so. No child should be warehoused. No child should be in a cage. But the federal government has created orphanages — complete with cages. The world should be outraged.

    I have not been able to sleep for days. I’ve cried buckets of tears over the immoral situation on our southern border. The audio of children crying themselves hoarse just ripped my heart out. I was glad to see the LDS Church and Catholic Church weighing in. Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox also weighed in with an awesome Twitter thread that starts:

    Can’t sleep tonight. I know I shouldn’t tweet. But I’m angry. And sad. I hate what we’ve become. My wife wants to go & hold babies & read to lonely/scared/sad kids. I want to punch someone. Political tribalism is stupid. It sucks & it’s dangerous. We are all part of the problem.

    — Spencer Cox (@SpencerJCox) June 20, 2018

    Our federal delegation has weighed in on the side of humanity and for that, I thank them.

    There are 11,785 migrant children in the United States without their parents. No one knows for sure how many are under age 13, but it’s enough that three “tender age” shelters have been opened and a fourth is planned to hold up to 240 young children in a Houston warehouse. Some of the children are just a few months old.

    Children are also being exported to other states. There are 100 shelters in 17 states. Michigan is being sent children younger than they’ve ever seen before. Agustin Arbulu, executive director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights, said, “Some of the children [arriving here] are as young as 3 months of age and are completely unable to advocate for themselves.”

    Their parents did not go with them.

    This administration knew exactly what it was doing. Within days of announcing a new “zero tolerance” policy, the government issued a request for proposals from shelter and foster care providers to provide services for the influx of children.

    Yesterday, federal officials said that since May 1, 2,342 children have been separated from their families. They’ve also been reclassified from members of a family unit to “unaccompanied alien children.” Let that sink in. They are separated from their families and then labeled as having no family. Even if they are so young they are nonverbal — clearly not children who took off on their own.

    This issue has caused an uproar on more than one front. One is the immediate and growing public backlash from instituting a “zero tolerance” policy that really is a “zero humanity” policy. But another uproar is occurring because of either the silence of those who can and should weigh in on this issue, or even worse, those who have spoken in favor of this abhorrent policy.

    Let’s be frank. If you have stayed silent on this issue — or have supported it — you’ve lost the right to call yourself pro-life and pro-family.

    I’ve seen and heard far too many people say, “It’s complicated,” or, “Well, someone else started it,” or even, “That’s what you get for breaking the law.” It’s not that complicated. I don’t care who started it. And, please, let’s stop conflating crossing the border with felonies. It’s not. It is legal for asylum-seekers to cross the border and request asylum. There are multiple accounts of families seeking asylum being separated at the border. That is illegal on the part of the federal government. At worst, it’s a misdemeanor, like speeding. We are not in the habit of yanking kids away from their parents and throwing the parents in jail because they have a lead foot on I-15.

    In the time I’ve been working on this column, President Donald Trump has signed an executive order to end the practice of separating kids from their families. That is good. It’s also just a start. We cannot create internment camps with indefinite detention. There are literally thousands of children who need to be reunited with their families and not remain lost in the system. And no one should ever forget that this administration is willing to break the tender hearts of children to use as a bargaining chip.

    The last words of the Old Testament are “And he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.”

    Families belong together.

    Holly Richardson is currently volunteering at an orphanage in Belize, a country that is working on eliminating orphanages because children should grow up in families.

    A Canadian firm wants to start mining on Utah lands that used to be part of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument


    A Canadian firm has announced its intention to mine copper and cobalt on public lands in Utah’s scenic Circle Cliffs east of Boulder, telling potential investors it has acquired what appear to be the first mining claims filed on lands removed from...

    A Canadian firm has announced its intention to mine copper and cobalt on public lands in Utah’s scenic Circle Cliffs east of Boulder, telling potential investors it has acquired what appear to be the first mining claims filed on lands removed from Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

    The move set off alarms among environmental groups seeking the monument’s restoration, but it remains unlikely that Glacier Lake Resources’ plans will be realized anytime soon. The Bureau of Land Management will continue to manage these lands as a monument until a new management plan is in place.

    “No one has validly changed the status of these lands. It’s still a national monument. It’s still closed to mining and any mineral exploration. Any claims like this are invalid,” said Nada Culver, senior counsel to The Wilderness Society. “You can say whatever you want, but that doesn’t translate into reality on the ground that you have the right to destroy a national monument. We are going to be watching, and we are not going to let you do it.”

    Others argued the recent appearance of the mining proposal suggests access to minerals motivated the Trump administration’s recent order to dismember the Grand Staircase.

    President Bill Clinton established the 1.9 million-acre monument, sprawling across broad swaths of Garfield and Kane counties, in 1996. But late last year, President Donald Trump signed an executive order reducing the monument by almost half. The Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance and several groups quickly sued seeking to restore the monument.

    Starting Feb. 2, however, mining claims could be filed on the nearly 900,000 acres removed from the monument. W. Dan Proctor, a geologist based in Pleasant Grove, began examining an abandoned mine site and staked out claims marked with 4-foot-high monuments, according to documents filed April 23 in Garfield County offices in Panguitch.

    He filed 10 claims covering a 266-acre rectangle that saw mining activity in the early 1970s, according to a news release posted June 13 by Glacier Lake, based in Vancouver, British Columbia.

    The remote spot, accessed by a dirt road from Boulder, is a few miles west of Capitol Reef National Park’s Waterpocket Fold and abuts the northern boundary of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.

    The BLM was unaware of Circle Cliff claims until only recently when they were submitted to the agency’s state office in Salt Lake City.

    “President Trump right-sized the monument to protect the objects, including the paleontological resources, while restoring much of the excluded lands to multiple use,” Interior Department spokesman Heather Swift wrote in an email. “The Bureau of Land Management is managing the land transparently and in accordance with all environmental and public land laws.”

    Yet Glacier Lake’s new release proclaims “acquisition of Colt Mesa Copper-Cobalt property,” even though no property right has been established to these lands.

    “Surface exploration work will start this summer on the Colt Mesa property and drill permitting will be initiated shortly,” Glacier Lake President Satvir “Saf” Dhillon said in the release, which also boasted “excellent year-round logistics.” Dhillon did not respond to voicemail messages.

    The company has yet to contact the BLM’s Utah office about its proposal, according to Swift.

    ”BLM will be involved in reviewing any notice of intent or plan of operations,” she said, “and will conduct any required environmental analysis consistent with its regulations and legal obligations.”

    The company cited “recent sampling,” which showed mineralization for zinc, nickel and molybdenum, in addition to the copper and cobalt.

    The site was mined between 1971 and 1974, according to the release, and the mine’s tunnels have been sealed.

    Culver believes Glacier Lake is overstating the site’s potential to drum up investor interest.

    “This is not property. They don’t own the land. They have no access to damage the land,” Culver said, adding the BLM should inform potential claimants that these lands are not currently available.

    “It would be helpful, especially with entities like this running around, putting stakes in the ground, making grandiose statements,” she said. “The BLM has a responsibility to be transparent with the public about what’s happening and be transparent with these companies that this is not a free-for-all.”

    The filing of a mining claim is an initial step toward establishing a legal right of access to the underlying minerals. Asserting a right requires the payment of annual fees and maintenance work that might not be allowed under current management prescriptions.

    The BLM is revising the plan for the 900,000 acres removed from the monument. It could be several months before it is finalized — if not longer.

    This land could be again available for mining but only if Trump’s executive order survives legal challenges and the revised management plan for these lands allows it. Both are big ifs, environmental activists say.

    BYU’s basketball schedule makes Nick Emery available vs. Utah State and Utah


    BYU guard Nick Emery will be available for in-state games vs. Utah State and Utah, after missing the first nine contests of the 2018-19 season due to NCAA sanctions. That’s the most significant finding in the Cougars’ non-conference basketball...

    BYU guard Nick Emery will be available for in-state games vs. Utah State and Utah, after missing the first nine contests of the 2018-19 season due to NCAA sanctions.

    That’s the most significant finding in the Cougars’ non-conference basketball schedule of 15 games, announced Thursday. Several opponents and dates had been reported previously, so the question became where Game 10 would fall on the schedule, enabling Emery to play in his return to basketball after withdrawing from the school in November.

    BYU recently announced that Emery was reinstated, following the NCAA’s review of his case involving improper benefits provided by a booster, as The Tribune previously reported. The Cougars will host Utah State on Dec. 5 in their 10th contest, then will meet Utah three nights later in the Beehive Classic at Vivint Smart Home Arena.

    That game long ago was scheduled for Dec. 8. Factoring in a Christmas break, there’s practically no way it could have come at Game 9 or sooner on BYU’s schedule.

    Emery, who averaged 14.7 points through two seasons, will miss games against highly ranked Nevada, plus Utah Valley, Houston and Weber State, among others.

    BYU’s Nov. 6 opener at Nevada marks the first time in seven years that the Cougars will start a season on the road. A six-game homestand over 16 days follows, ending with Houston on Nov. 24 — the day of the Utah-BYU football game in Salt Lake City. The football kickoff time will be announced 12 days before the game, at the earliest. No basketball tipoff times have been set.

    The Cougars also have a home basketball game vs. Alabama A&M on Nov. 17, the same date as a football game vs. New Mexico State in Provo.

    In the second half of December, the Cougars will have a spread-out schedule of three high-profile road games, each on a Saturday. They will meet UNLV at the technically neutral site of T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas on Dec. 15, then visit San Diego State and Mississippi State.

    The 16-game West Coast Conference schedule (reduced from 18 games) will begin Jan. 3. Those dates usually are announced in August. BYU will meet Pepperdine (road) and Santa Clara (home) once each in this season’s format.

    BYU NONCONFERENCE BASKETBALL SCHEDULE
    Nov. 1 – Westminster (exhibition).
    Nov. 6 – at Nevada.
    Nov. 9 – Utah Valley.
    Nov. 13 – Northwestern State.
    Nov. 15 – Oral Roberts.
    Nov. 17 – Alabama A&M.
    Nov. 21 – Rice.
    Nov. 24 – Houston.
    Nov. 28 – at Illinois State.
    Dec. 1 – at Weber State.
    Dec. 5 – Utah State.
    Dec. 8 – Utah (Vivint Smart Home Arena).
    Dec. 12 – Portland State.
    Dec. 15 – UNLV (T-Mobile Arena).
    Dec. 22 – at San Diego State.
    Dec. 29 – at Mississippi State.

    UTA offers extra service, discounts to Hill Air Force Base air show this weekend


    The Utah Transit Authority is offering extra service and discounted fares for travelers to Hill Air Force Base’s Warriors Over the Wasatch Air and Space show on Saturday and Sunday.The FrontRunner commuter train normally does not operate on Sundays,...

    The Utah Transit Authority is offering extra service and discounted fares for travelers to Hill Air Force Base’s Warriors Over the Wasatch Air and Space show on Saturday and Sunday.

    The FrontRunner commuter train normally does not operate on Sundays, but will for the air show — operating from 6:55 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. It will also offer extra FrontRunner service on Saturday.

    Buses will run every 15 minutes to the base from the Clearfield FrontRunner station, 1250 S. State Street, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on both days.

    UTA will also offer a special $5 round-trip fare for air show attendees, if purchased on the UTA GoRide mobile app. It allows buying fares for up to 10 riders at the same time, and covers rides on FrontRunner, TRAX, buses and streetcars.

    Children younger than 6 may ride free when accompanied by a fare-paying adult.

    Poll: Romney up 42 points over Kennedy ahead of Tuesday’s primary

    Poll: Romney up 42 points over Kennedy ahead of Tuesday’s primary


    Washington • Mitt Romney holds a sizable lead over state Rep. Mike Kennedy in their primary battle for the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate, a new Salt Lake Tribune-Hinckley Institute of Politics poll shows.Romney garnered nearly 65 percent of registered...

    Washington • Mitt Romney holds a sizable lead over state Rep. Mike Kennedy in their primary battle for the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate, a new Salt Lake Tribune-Hinckley Institute of Politics poll shows.

    Romney garnered nearly 65 percent of registered Republicans compared to Kennedy’s 23 percent, the poll found ahead of Tuesday’s primary. Romney also carried every category of political leanings among Republicans surveyed, including nearly 46 percent of those who described themselves as very conservative.

    Some 4 percent of GOP voters said they would vote for another candidate and 8 percent were undecided in the poll conducted June 11-18.

    “The results are as expected and are consistent with every poll that has been done this year,” said Jason Perry, executive director of the Hinckley Institute. “It says that [Romney] does have staying power. In spite of efforts from his opponent to portray him as something else, he remains very popular in the state of Utah and has amassed a significant lead.”

    The poll, conducted by the Hinckley Institute at the University of Utah, surveyed 356 registered Republicans and has a margin of error of plus or minus 5.2 percentage points.

    Romney’s campaign declined comment Wednesday.

    For his part, Kennedy dismissed the poll and said he sees momentum tipping his way.

    “Our polling is showing differently and we remain focused on working hard to speak with and represent regular Utahns in our fight to change the establishment in Washington and finally reduce our deficit,” Kennedy said in a statement.

    The Tribune-Hinckley Institute also polled on possible general election matchups between the GOP candidates and Salt Lake County Councilwoman Jenny Wilson, the Democratic nominee for Senate.

    Romney, the poll shows, would trounce Wilson 58-20 percent if the general election were held now, while Kennedy takes in 43 percent to Wilson’s 28 percent.

    That statewide poll queried 654 registered voters and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.9 percentage points.

    Wilson noted that there’s a lot of time between now and the general election and said Utah voters will see she’s the right one for their support.

    “Utah’s Senate seat is not a family heirloom to be handed down from one person to another,” Wilson said in a statement.

    “Our citizens deserve a real debate and an opportunity to learn about where the candidates really stand,” she continued. “I know that on Election Day, Utahns will have an opportunity to vote for a candidate who will fight for tax reform for working families instead of give-aways to corporations, who supports compassionate and family-centered immigration reform instead of policies that are to the right of the [Trump] administration, and who is committed to working across the aisle to produce real results.”

    In the primary matchup, Romney has a large money advantage, reporting nearly $2 million in donations in the past two months while Kennedy took in $152,000 in the same period.

    Romney’s campaign has $1.6 million in the bank and $41,000 in debt while Kennedy has $66,000 on hand and debt totaling nearly $300,000. The debt is all owed to Kennedy, who loaned his campaign money in several installments

    Romney, who served as governor of Massachusetts and was the 2012 Republican presidential candidate, is a well-known figure in Utah, having been credited with rescuing the scandal-plagued 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

    Kennedy, a medical doctor, has served in the Utah Legislature since 2013 and while he won more delegates at the State GOP Convention, he has struggled to find footing in the primary race against Romney.

    Perry, the Hinckley director, says the general election polling reflects the deep Republican leanings in Utah but Romney has the added bonus of name recognition and money to help boost him even further.

    “We are a long ways away from the general election, but there reason for Mitt Romney to be very optimistic about where he is right now,” Perry said.

    Monday evening, before the poll results were available, Romney told The Tribune he was “cautiously optimistic” about next week’s primary and planned to continue working hard until the ballots are counted.

    Romney finished second, behind Kennedy, at April’s Utah Republican Convention, but with enough delegate support to advance to the June primary. The former GOP presidential candidate had also gathered signatures under Utah’s dual-track primary election law to ensure he could not be eliminated by delegates in April.

    A point of division between Romney and Kennedy occurred in May when Romney questioned the participation of Texas Baptist pastor Robert Jeffress in the ceremonial launch of the U.S. embassy in Jerusalem, citing past statements by Jeffress that were critical and dismissive of Mormons, Jews and Muslims.

    Kennedy personally called Jeffress to apologize, generating a debate over whether the pastor’s comments — including that Mormonism is “a heresy from the pit of hell,” that Jews cannot be saved and Islam also is evil — constitute religious bigotry.

    Reporter Ben Wood contributed to this story.

    #NeverTrump to #OKTrump: Romney’s evolution mirrors party


    Park City, Utah • Mitt Romney did not ride a donkey.But the one-time presidential nominee and now candidate for Senate did cheer enthusiastically at a donkey basketball game, campaigning on the ground in Utah like a homegrown hero — even though he...

    Park City, Utah • Mitt Romney did not ride a donkey.

    But the one-time presidential nominee and now candidate for Senate did cheer enthusiastically at a donkey basketball game, campaigning on the ground in Utah like a homegrown hero — even though he grew up somewhere else. What he isn’t doing much is talking about President Trump.

    Romney was once a leading figure in the “Never Trump” movement, but now he says he wants to work with the president. What does his evolution mean for Republicans still opposed to Trump?

    What’s Happening

    Romney, the Republican presidential nominee in 2012, has dropped his harsh critique of Trump as he mounts a political comeback as a Senate candidate in Utah ahead of a June 26 primary. Romney recently surprised his most loyal supporters, who include many Trump critics, by predicting the Republican president would win a second term in 2020. He also downplayed concerns about Trump’s policies on trade, spending and national security — the same policies he warned, in a high-profile 2016 speech, would trigger an economic recession and jeopardize national security.

    “I think President Trump will be re-nominated by my party easily and I think he’ll be re-elected solidly,” Romney told dozens of supporters at a luxury Utah resort.

    Why It Matters

    Romney’s team is downplaying the significance of his new position, but by embracing Trump’s re-election he’s sending a strong message to the president’s Republican critics just as they’re beginning to contemplate strategies to stop — or at least slow — his 2020 re-election. The message, according to some Republicans who shared their reaction on and off the record: “No matter how you feel, stop fighting Trump; it’s not worth it.”

    While many Republicans in Congress got that message after the 2016 election, for a smaller group of others, quiet conversations had continued about the possibility of mounting a 2020 challenge against him — either in a Republican primary or as an independent. High-profile Republicans such as Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich are openly contemplating such a move.

    Romney’s position doesn’t kill their prospective plans, but it certainly makes them harder to pull off with any kind of legitimacy.

    What to Watch

    Will Romney continue his deferential tone with Trump after his Republican Senate primary on Tuesday? In a heavily Republican state, his election to the U.S. Senate is all but assured if he wins the June 26 primary as expected.

    Many Trump skeptics in the Republican establishment hope Romney will emerge as a Trump cudgel when he gets to Washington.

    It could be that Romney has simply been downplaying his opposition to the Republican president in recent months to avoid enflaming Trump’s loyal supporters before next week’s Republican-on-Republican contest. Or, as some of his closest advisers suggest, it could be that Romney was never going to be the Trump antagonist that some hoped for.

    Either way, the 71-year-old Republican leader should have an extraordinary megaphone on Capitol Hill that will help elevate his standing as a freshman. As a former presidential nominee, he’s sure to command attention wherever he goes. It remains unclear, however, whether he’ll use that status to challenge the president he once called “a con man.”

    One Last Thing

    Despite all the interest in his relationship with the president, Romney isn’t running as a big shot.

    The one-time political celebrity is turning down national media requests in favor of local outlets. On the ground in Utah, he’s kept a packed schedule, campaigning at local parks, private homes and sporting events— including that donkey basketball fundraiser, where he cheered on a 4-H group mounted on donkeys and shooting hoops.

    The aim is to convince Utah voters that he knows state issues and priorities. And he’ll use his clout on their behalf in Washington.

    High Court: Online shoppers can be forced to pay sales tax


    Washington • States will be able to force shoppers to pay sales tax when they make online purchases under a Supreme Court decision Thursday that will leave shoppers with lighter wallets but is a big win for states.More than 40 states had asked the high...

    Washington • States will be able to force shoppers to pay sales tax when they make online purchases under a Supreme Court decision Thursday that will leave shoppers with lighter wallets but is a big win for states.

    More than 40 states had asked the high court to overrule two, decades-old Supreme Court decisions that they said cost them billions of dollars in lost revenue annually. The decisions made it more difficult for states to collect sales tax on certain online purchases.

    On Thursday, the Supreme Court agreed to overturn those decisions in a 5-4 ruling. The cases the court overturned said that if a business was shipping a customer’s purchase to a state where the business didn’t have a physical presence such as a warehouse or office, the business didn’t have to collect the state’s sales tax. Customers were generally responsible for paying the sales tax to the state themselves if they weren’t charged it, but most didn’t realize they owed it and few paid.

    Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote that the previous decisions were flawed.

    “Each year the physical presence rule becomes further removed from economic reality and results in significant revenue losses to the States. These critiques underscore that the physical presence rule, both as first formulated and as applied today, is an incorrect interpretation of the Commerce Clause,” he wrote in an opinion joined by Justices Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch.

    In addition to being a win for states, the ruling is also a win for large retailers, who argued the physical presence rule was unfair. Large retailers including Apple, Macy’s, Target and Walmart, which have brick-and-mortar stores nationwide, already generally collect sales tax from their customers who buy online. That’s because they typically have a physical store in whatever state the purchase is being shipped to. Amazon.com, with its network of warehouses, also collects sales tax in every state that charges it, though third party sellers who use the site to sell goods don’t have to.

    But sellers that only have a physical presence in a single state or a few states have been able to avoid charging customers sales tax when they shipped to addresses outside those states. Online sellers that haven’t been charging sales tax on goods shipped to every state range from jewelry website Blue Nile to pet products site Chewy.com to clothing retailer L.L. Bean. Sellers who use eBay and Etsy, which provide platforms for smaller sellers, also haven’t been collecting sales tax nationwide.

    Under the Supreme Court’s decision Thursday, states can pass laws requiring sellers without a physical presence in the state to collect the state’s sales tax from customers and send it to the state.

    The National Retail Federation trade group, said in a statement that the court’s decision was a “major victory” but the group said federal legislation is necessary to spell out details on how sales tax collection will take place, rather than leaving it to each of the states to interpret the court’s decision.

    Chief Justice John Roberts and three of his colleagues would have kept the court’s previous decisions in place. Roberts wrote that Congress, not the court, should change the rules if necessary.

    “Any alteration to those rules with the potential to disrupt the development of such a critical segment of the economy should be undertaken by Congress,” Roberts wrote in a dissent joined by Justices Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor.

    The case the court ruled in has to do with a law passed by South Dakota in 2016. South Dakota’s governor has said his state has been losing out on an estimated $50 million a year in sales tax that doesn’t get collected by out-of-state sellers. Lawmakers in the state, which has no income tax, passed a law designed to directly challenge the Supreme Court’s 1992 decision. The law requires out-of-state sellers who do more than $100,000 of business in the state or more than 200 transactions annually with state residents to collect sales tax and turn it over to the state.

    South Dakota wanted out-of-state retailers to begin collecting the tax and sued several of them: Overstock.com, electronics retailer Newegg and home goods company Wayfair. The state conceded in court, however, that it could only win by persuading the Supreme Court to do away with its physical presence rule. After the decision was announced, shares in Wayfair and Overstock both fell, with Wayfair down more than 3 percent and Overstock down more than 2 percent.

    The Trump administration had urged the justices to side with South Dakota.

    The case is South Dakota v. Wayfair, 17-494.

    Koko, the gorilla who knew sign language, dies at 46


    Woodside, Calif. • Koko, the gorilla who mastered sign language, raised kittens and once playfully tried on the glasses of the late actor Robin Williams, has died. She was 46.The Gorilla Foundation says the western lowland gorilla died in her sleep at...

    Woodside, Calif. • Koko, the gorilla who mastered sign language, raised kittens and once playfully tried on the glasses of the late actor Robin Williams, has died. She was 46.

    The Gorilla Foundation says the western lowland gorilla died in her sleep at the foundation’s preserve in California’s Santa Cruz mountains on Tuesday.

    Koko’s capacity for language and empathy opened the minds and hearts of millions of people, the foundation said. She appeared in many documentaries and twice in National Geographic. The gorilla’s 1978 cover featured a photo that the animal had taken of herself in a mirror.

    Williams, another San Francisco Bay area legend, met Koko in 2001 and called it a “mind-altering experience.” The two hold hands and tickle each other in a widely shared video.

    “We shared something extraordinary: Laughter,” he says. “Koko understands spoken English and uses over 1,000 signs to share her feelings and thoughts about daily events. Life, love, even death.”

    “It was awesome and unforgettable,” said the actor, who killed himself in August 2014.

    Fans mourned Koko’s passing, and the foundation’s website experienced excessive traffic on Thursday.

    “Legit bawling like a baby right now,” a person posted on the foundation’s Facebook page. “From an early age I was fascinated with Koko and she taught me so much about love, kindness, respect for animals, and our planet.”

    Another person posted: “At least Koko can finally be reunited with All Ball.”

    “All Ball” was the name of the first of several kittens Koko raised into cat-hood. She chose the gray and white kitten from a litter for her birthday in 1984, according to a 1985 Los Angeles Times article.

    “The cat was a Manx and looked like a ball. Koko likes to rhyme words in sign language,” Ron Cohn said, a biologist with the foundation.

    All Ball died after being hit by a car. Cohn said Koko was grief-stricken by the kitten’s death.

    Koko was born Hanabi-ko, Japanese for “fireworks child, on July 4, 1971, at the San Francisco Zoo. Dr. Francine “Penny” Patterson began teaching the gorilla sign language and the project moved to Stanford University in 1974, the foundation said.

    In 2004, Koko used American Sign Language to communicate that her mouth hurt and used a pain scale of 1 to 10 to show how badly it hurt, according to an AP news story.

    Koko was also part of a lawsuit when two former caretakers said they had been fired to refusing to bare their breasts to the gorilla, who apparently loved nipples. The women settled with the foundation in 2005.

    Koko painted objects in her environment but also expressions of her thoughts and emotions. She used signed language to name her paintings.

    The foundation says it will honor Koko’s legacy with a sign language application featuring Koko for the benefit of gorillas and children, as well as other projects.

    First lady visits migrant children at Texas detention center

    First lady visits migrant children at Texas detention center


    McAllen, Texas • Melania Trump made an unannounced visit to a Texas facility Thursday to get a first-hand look at some of the migrant children sent there by the U.S. government after their families entered the country illegally.The first lady’s stop...

    McAllen, Texas • Melania Trump made an unannounced visit to a Texas facility Thursday to get a first-hand look at some of the migrant children sent there by the U.S. government after their families entered the country illegally.

    The first lady’s stop at Upbring New Hope Children’s Center in McAllen came the morning after President Donald Trump signed an executive order halting the practice of separating these families. She may also visit a second facility later in the day where children housed in cages were seen by The Associated Press last week. Trump had come under pressure to stop the practice, including from GOP allies and the first lady herself, following a public outcry sparked by widespread images of children held in fence-like structures.

    The trip was intended to lend support to those children who remain separated from their parents, said Stephanie Grisham, the first lady’s spokeswoman.

    “She wanted to see everything for herself,” Grisham said.

    The president had insisted incorrectly that his administration had no choice but to separate families apprehended at the border because children cannot go to jail with adults who are being criminally prosecuted for crossing the border illegally. Trump had said only Congress could fix the problem and he specifically pointed a finger at Democrats.

    He reversed course Wednesday by signing the order ending separations and keeping families together when they are in custody, at least for the next few weeks. The administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy of criminally prosecuting illegal border-crossers, which has led to the removal of some 2,300 children from their parents since May, remains.

    Accompanied by Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Mrs. Trump met with the executive director of the facility and other staff in a makeshift conference room where she was told the staff treated the 58 children housed there as if they were their own.

    The first lady asked that the children be reunited with their families “as quickly as possible.”

    The trip came together within the past 48 hours, Grisham said.

    “She told her staff she wanted to go and we made that happen,” she said.

    Trump, speaking at a Cabinet meeting, said that his wife was “down at the border,‘” and Grisham said that the first lady had the full backing of her husband.

    “She told him ‘I am headed down to Texas’ and he was supportive.”

    Mrs. Trump, whose focus as first lady is on child well-being, appears to have been among those pushing her husband to act.

    Grisham released a statement last weekend saying the first lady “hates” to see children separated from their families and “believes we need to be a country that follows all laws, but also a country that governs with heart.”

    Hours before Trump used his executive order to halt family separations, a White House official let it be known that Mrs. Trump had been voicing her opinion to the president for some time, including that he needed to help families stay together. The official refused to be identified discussing Trump’s private conversations with his wife.

    Trump acknowledged Wednesday that the mother of his 12-year-old son, Barron, had been prodding him.

    “My wife feels very strongly about it,” he told reporters after he signed the order.

    The pair of statements from the first lady amounted to an unusual public intervention by Mrs. Trump into a policy debate. Her four former living predecessors, seemingly encouraged after Laura Bush authored a scathing opinion piece, followed with sharper commentary of their own condemning the family separations as shameful.

    The last-minute trip to Texas marks the first public action by Mrs. Trump since she announced in May an initiative named “Be Best” to focus on the overall well-being of children and help teach them kindness. She had been expected to travel to promote the campaign but was sidelined a week after the announcement following surgery to treat a benign kidney condition.

    Riverton City is eliminating its $200 business license fee


    Riverton City approved a budget that eliminates its annual $200 license fee for all businesses except those that sell alcohol or fireworks, making it the first city in Salt Lake County to go fee free.“We understand the value our local businesses...

    Riverton City approved a budget that eliminates its annual $200 license fee for all businesses except those that sell alcohol or fireworks, making it the first city in Salt Lake County to go fee free.

    “We understand the value our local businesses provide to our city and our residents,” Mayor Trent Staggs said in a prepared statement Thursday. “By eliminating the business licensing fee, we want to send a clear message that Riverton is open for business.”

    Staggs proposed elimination of the business license fee in his budget recommendation and it was adopted in the final budget approved Tuesday by the City Council. No-fee licensing takes effect July 1, and applies to new licenses and renewals.

    The estimated revenue loss of $90,000 to $95,000 will be offset by an uptick in sales-tax receipts, city officials said.

    Fireworks vendors and outlets that serve or sell alcohol were exempted because they are believed to have a greater impact on the city and its services, said spokesman Casey Saxton.

    Utah to pay $450K to the widow of an inmate killed in prison, settling a lawsuit


    State officials have agreed to pay nearly half a million dollars to the widow of an inmate who was beaten and stabbed to death at the Utah State Prison in 2016.A lawsuit filed in federal court claims corrections officers knew it would be dangerous to...

    State officials have agreed to pay nearly half a million dollars to the widow of an inmate who was beaten and stabbed to death at the Utah State Prison in 2016.

    A lawsuit filed in federal court claims corrections officers knew it would be dangerous to move 24-year-old Jeffrey Ray Vigil to a unit where rival gang members were housed — but placed Vigil there anyway on March 14, 2016.

    Just hours after he was moved to the Oquirrh 1, Section 2 housing unit, the Ogden Trece gang member was stabbed and stomped for eight minutes. Those accused of the crime are members of another Ogden gang, Titanic Crip Society.

    Vigil was taken to a local hospital, where he died the next day.

    Months after the attack, his wife, Chelsie Vigil, filed a federal lawsuit claiming the Utah Department of Corrections violated her husband’s constitutional rights by failing to keep him safe. The original filing sought $20 million in compensatory damages and an unspecified amount of money in punitive damages.

    Earlier this month, attorneys asked a judge to dismiss the case, saying they had reached a settlement.

    Prison officials initially said settlement terms were private, but the Utah attorney general’s office on Thursday released a document in response to a public records request showing the state agreed to pay $450,000 to Vigil’s widow.

    Settlement documents show that state officials did not admit liability or wrongdoing in paying the sum, but did so to “avoid the expense and burdens of litigation.”

    Two men are facing charges in connection to Jeffrey Vigil’s death. Ramon Luis Rivera, 32, is charged with first-degree felony aggravated murder and other crimes, while 40-year-old Albert Collin Fernandez faces murder and obstruction of justice charges for his alleged role in the fatal beating.

    Prison surveillance footage played during Rivera’s preliminary hearing shows an inmate who authorities say is Rivera repeatedly stabbing Vigil by a flight of stairs. The footage then shows the two walk to the middle of the common area, where the fight resumes with Rivera kicking and stomping Vigil more than 70 times. Fernandez is accused of punching and kicking Vigil and later blocking the victim’s escape as he was being stabbed.

    Rivera later told police he had instructed Vigil to get himself relocated before the fight.

    “ ‘You either leave or you’re going to die,’ Either that or he’s going to kill me,” Rivera said in a recorded interview. “One of us is going to die.”

    Rivera’s and Fernandez’s criminal cases are still pending.

    Tribune reporter Paighten Harkins contributed to this story.

    The all-time NBA draft — the best pick from every slot, including one Jazz legend


    There’s a definitive answer every year to the question of who is No. 1 in the NBA draft.But who is the No. 1 pick of all No. 1 draft picks ever? Or No. 1 among the list of No. 2 draft picks? Those are questions that have no definitive answer, except...

    There’s a definitive answer every year to the question of who is No. 1 in the NBA draft.

    But who is the No. 1 pick of all No. 1 draft picks ever? Or No. 1 among the list of No. 2 draft picks? Those are questions that have no definitive answer, except perhaps in a handful of rare cases.

    Here’s a look at The Best of The Best — the top all-time NBA picks in each of the top 30 draft spots. The best No. 1 overall pick, the best No. 2 overall pick ... and so on.

    One note: This doesn’t include the territorial selections that were used through 1965, which ruled out Wilt Chamberlain.

    The list of top picks in each of the 30 draft slots:

    1. KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR

    Arguments for the best-ever overall pick could and should be made for LeBron James, Shaquille O’Neal, Oscar Robertson and Magic Johnson, among others. When in doubt, give it to the man who has more points than anyone who ever played the game and who mastered perhaps the most difficult shot to guard in NBA history.

    2. BILL RUSSELL

    You didn’t know Bill Russell was a No. 2 overall pick? Jerry West was too, and he’s The Logo for goodness sake, but the 11 rings make Russell the call here. Also, it’s time to lay off Portland. Sam Bowie wasn’t the biggest “oops” pick of all time. Si Green was picked before Russell in 1956.

    3. MICHAEL JORDAN

    The easiest pick of them all. Except for Portland in 1984, when the Trail Blazers took Bowie No. 2 ahead of MJ. OK, now it’s really time to lay off Portland.

    4. CHRIS PAUL

    Dikembe Mutombo, Chris Bosh and Russell Westbrook were all No. 4s as well, but Paul’s body of work over 13 seasons and counting can’t be overlooked.

    5. DWYANE WADE

    Charles Barkley will think this pick is terrible. So will fellow No. 5s Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen, Scottie Pippen and Vince Carter. Wade’s scoring wins out.

    6. LARRY BIRD

    Second-easiest pick of this process. Only Adrian Dantley comes close, and he absolutely doesn’t come close.

    7. STEPHEN CURRY

    He will be the leader in 3-pointers, by a ton, when his career is over. Fellow No. 7s John Havlicek and Chris Mullin merit consideration, but why wait?

    8. ROBERT PARISH

    As time goes on, people might forget how vital The Chief was to those Celtics teams of the 1980s. That shouldn’t happen.

    9. DIRK NOWITZKI

    Jordan was the only true candidate at No. 3, Bird was the same at No. 6, and Nowitzki stands alone at No. 9 as well.

    10. PAUL PIERCE

    Pierce and Nowitzki have haunted those who made the decisions at the top of the 1998 draft — where Michael Olowokandi, Mike Bibby and Raef LaFrentz went 1-2-3 — for 20 years and counting.

    11. REGGIE MILLER

    Kiki VanDeWeghe was a No. 11 pick and so was Klay Thompson, but Miller is the deserving call here. His shot was art.

    12. JULIUS ERVING

    Drafted in 1972 and didn’t come to the NBA until 1976, Doctor J ekes out the pick here over Chet Walker — a seven-time All-Star.

    13. KOBE BRYANT

    This could easily have been Karl Malone. But Kobe has five rings and an Oscar.

    14. CLYDE DREXLER

    The Glide was automatic for 20 points a night for basically his entire career. Apologies to Tim Hardaway.

    15. STEVE NASH

    Someday, this spot might go to Giannis Antetokounmpo or Kawhi Leonard. But Steve Nash going this low in 1996 should remind everyone how good that draft was.

    16. JOHN STOCKTON

    This is yet another reminder that Sam Bowie wasn’t the only mistake made in 1984.

    17. DON NELSON

    This was a difficult group, and Shawn Kemp was probably the better player. Nellie gets the call on total body of NBA work.

    18. JOE DUMARS

    There are some really good players at No. 18, including Calvin Murphy and the vastly underrated Ricky Pierce. Dumars’ role on the Bad Boys was invaluable.

    19. TINY ARCHIBALD

    When looking at No. 19 picks, two things stand out: Rod Strickland should have been an All-Star, and that Tiny was better than many remember.

    20. LARRY NANCE

    So consistent for so long, and now with his son in the league that means more people will get educated about Sr.’s game.

    21. RAJON RONDO

    Michael Finley and Ricky Davis also went this far down in the draft. Rondo was an absolute steal in 2006 — except he wasn’t a steal for Phoenix, which drafted him and then traded him to Boston for cash.

    22. REGGIE LEWIS

    Still sad. Still missed.

    23. ALEX ENGLISH

    Tayshaun Prince was so good and World B. Free was as much fun as anyone, but English had about a 10-year run where he hardly ever missed a game and dropped about 25 every time he was out there.

    24. ARVYDAS SABONIS

    Officially, the hardest of all 30 picks. Don’t just look at his NBA numbers. Look at his whole career. He did things no big man was doing 20 years ago. Terry Porter, Andrei Kirilenko, Kyle Lowry, Sam Cassell, Derek Fisher, Latrell Sprewell all went No. 24 as well ... good luck to whoever No. 24 is this year. There’s a legacy to follow.

    25. MARK PRICE

    Jeff Ruland was known as “McFilthy” and became a good college coach, Tony Allen was a true defensive star, but Price’s game is too solid to miss here.

    26. VLADE DIVAC

    Now running the Sacramento Kings, Divac gets to pick No. 2 in this year’s draft. The guy he takes there would be well-served to learn from Vlade.

    27. DENNIS RODMAN

    Before he became a political operative, Rodman was as good at rebounding and defense as anyone in the game.

    28. TONY PARKER

    If he had grown up in the U.S. and played college basketball, there was no chance he would have gone this low in 2001.

    29. DENNIS JOHNSON

    Hall of Famer, five-time All-Star and someone who was as good as there was in the NBA down the stretch of big games.

    30. SPENCER HAYWOOD

    Another Hall of Famer, and every underclassman who gets drafted this year needs to thank Haywood. His suit vs. the NBA paved the way for them.

    Resurrected Twilight Concert Series will include Snoop Dogg, Diplo in 2018 lineup

    Resurrected Twilight Concert Series will include Snoop Dogg, Diplo in 2018 lineup


    Last October, Salt Lake City officials announced that the popular Twilight Concert Series was going on hiatus due to years of ballooning budgets and requests for emergency funding.Then, this past February, the nonprofit Salt Lake City Arts Council said...

    Last October, Salt Lake City officials announced that the popular Twilight Concert Series was going on hiatus due to years of ballooning budgets and requests for emergency funding.

    Then, this past February, the nonprofit Salt Lake City Arts Council said the long-running downtown music festival was getting a reprieve, thanks to its new partnership with Broadway Media.

    And on Thursday morning, the Arts Council and Broadway Media revealed the payoff of their four-month crunch to make it happen.

    The five-show lineup, to take place once again at the Gallivan Center, will include EDM superstar Diplo (Aug. 16); electronica singer-songwriter Robert DeLong (Aug. 23); indie-alt rock band Moon Taxi (Aug. 30); rapper Snoop Dogg’s funk persona, DJ Snoopadelic (Sept. 6); and rising pop sensation King Princess (Sept. 13).

    “[For] a traditional show, we book strictly based upon commercial numbers and how many people we’re gonna get in and how we’re gonna monetize this. Twilight is done, really, as an artistic curation,” said Jake Jensen, Broadway Media’s vice president for promotions and events.

    “That is a big thing with the Salt Lake Arts Council, where every single artist has to have a story, every single artist has a message. There is a diversity when it comes to the lineup,” he said. ”… We really tried to keep within that same theme this year, and mix in a whole variety of things that fit their specific needs.”

    Though the Gallivan Center has a 10,000-capacity maximum, each Twilight show will be capped at 7,000. Meanwhile, all tickets will be $10 in advance (online via twilightconcerts.com and 24.tix.com, and at Graywhale locations), and $15 day of show at the venue box office. A season pass is available for $50, which includes early entry to the venue for each show, and expedited season pass holder entry.

    There will be on-site entertainment, food trucks and restaurant booths, plus beer, wine and other alcohol options.

    Given that this year’s iteration of Twilight was very late in the making — “We are behind the eight ball a little bit, as far as booking talent,” Broadway president Kayvon Motiee acknowledged back in February — Jensen was pleased with how things worked out, though he admitted to myriad moments of frustration along the way in a process he conceded was “110 percent” more of a challenge than he expected.

    “It’s been very stressful. I’m not gonna lie,” he said. “It partly had to do with time. On a show like this, this is normally something that you put together in a year; we did it in 120 days.”

    That said, he did have a few things working in his favor.

    For one, Broadway’s extensive relationships with artists and management, plus Jensen’s experience in putting together other festival-type shows, made an impact both in booking talent and doing so at a cost that fit into the budget.

    Furthermore, the decision to move the Thursday night series back to Gallivan — where it took place for years before renovations moved it to Pioneer Park — impacted both advance planning as well as the bottom line. In short, the infrastructure costs associated with hosting the event at Pioneer Park (namely, weekly set-ups and tear-downs) had grown burdensome.

    “We adapted Twilight this year with bringing it back to Gallivan Center, because that’s where we can keep that $10 ticket, and be able to keep that accessibility,” Jensen said. “It would no longer be financially feasible to have kept it at Pioneer Park and still keep it an accessible $10 ticket.”

    That was a significant consideration. Changing the financing of the series was a necessity to continue it.

    Karen Krieger, the Arts Council’s executive director until recently, acknowledged in 2016 that although city funding for Twilight had increased over the years, it had not kept pace with expenditures required for artist fees, production fees, insurance costs, public safety and cleanup.

    And the past two years had seen about $250,000 in emergency, unallocated city funding go toward staging the Twilight schedules. Meanwhile, the Arts Council had approached the City Council in a January 2017 work session with a request for an annual $200,000 increase in the Twilight budget.

    Multiple requests for comment from the Arts Council were not returned.

    For now, at least, Twilight’s future remains up in the air. The agreement signed between the Arts Council and Broadway was for this year’s series only.

    Jensen, however, believes Broadway has provided an efficient pathway forward for the series, and would like the opportunity to show what it can do with a whole year to plan it.

    “We didn’t invest in this just to do it one-and-done, we invested in this to be able to help make a series that can be profitable and self-sustaining moving forward in the future,” he said. “ … We are hoping that we will have done our job well enough that there will be opportunities for us to continue making this thing work.

    “I’m sure as the last note is sung on the stage, I will have a sidebar going, ‘When are we gonna meet?’” Jensen added with a laugh. “But [right now], we’re focusing on this year and making sure we do this year correct.”

    That, of course, is to be determined. The lineup reveal always draws a strong reaction among Twilight aficionados.

    Jensen knew that going in. Now, he just hopes that this combination of established stars and intriguing up-and-comers will prove enticing enough for audiences.

    “Some people will love it, some people will hate it. That is the nature of doing shows,” he said. “… Hopefully we won’t suck this year, and people will have those positive experiences!”

    ———

    Jake Jensen on 2018 Twilight performers:

    Diplo • “If you look at the Mount Rushmore of EDM music, he is one of the heads on there. You look at his amazing career, with how he started, to now being one of the highest-paid DJs in the world, with both underground and corporate success. That was really an easy pick for the Arts Council and us.”

    Robert DeLong • “If you’ve had a chance to see Robert DeLong live, it’s a pretty amazing live show — he’s one of those artists who will take a really simple beat and be able to build and create this entire tapestry around it with just himself by using a mix of regular acoustic instruments and digital electronics, to create these things that are just absolutely fantastic.”

    Moon Taxi • “We’re talking about groups that have messages — Moon Taxi, you get into their lyrics, you get into the artistry behind their music, and it’s some pretty fantastic … I guess you could call it alternative poetry. It’s really neat. We’re definitely a fan of Moon Taxi — we think people will like them.”

    DJ Snoopadelic • “We all know Snoop has a variety of different versions of himself — Snoop Lion is his reggae one, he has a gospel version; Snoop is doing a project right now, and he’s done it at Electric Forest and a whole bunch of these big festivals, where it’s basically Snoop Dogg’s journey through funk and time. So not your traditional Snoop Dogg set — it’s a combination of a live plus a DJ set, just different elements. It’s something different you’ll see.”

    King Princess • “Every single year we have an act who genuinely has that story, genuinely has something to say that’s culturally relevant or culturally important for that moment. … King Princess, if you haven’t heard of her now, by the end of this summer you will have. In the last 60 days, she’s done just under 90 million plays on Spotify. This girl has absolutely blown up in the last couple of weeks. She is a lesbian girl from New York who has the most incredibly soulful storytelling voice I’ve ever heard. Her debut work is her telling her story through queerness, as she has said. … We think it’ll be a great note to end the series on, because it gives you a message, it gives you something to think about, it tells a story, and it does so in just absolutely beautiful fashion.”

    With the Pacific Northwest bumblebee in trouble, citizen-staffed study could be a test case for conservation efforts

    With the Pacific Northwest bumblebee in trouble, citizen-staffed study could be a test case for conservation efforts


    Boise, Idaho • Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northwest seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species.Bumblebees, experts say, are important pollinators for wild and...

    Boise, Idaho • Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northwest seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species.

    Bumblebees, experts say, are important pollinators for wild and agricultural plants, but some species have disappeared from places where they were once common, possibly because of the same factors that have been killing honeybees.

    “It’s really important for us as humans to study these species systems for animals that are the little guys that make the world go around,” said Ann Potter of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, one of the entities in three states — Oregon and Idaho are the others — participating in the three-year Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas project.

    Researchers hope to accumulate enough information to recommend ways to conserve bumblebees and their habitat.

    “There’s more and more interest in restoring habitat for pollinators,” said Rich Hatfield of the conservation group, the Xerces Society.

    Citizen scientists are being dispatched to selected 2.5-acre sites with insect nets, plant and bee guides, and an app for smartphones so findings can be recorded, photographed, mapped and sent to a central database. Researchers say just more than 200 have signed on to visit 400 sites through the end of August. More volunteers are needed, Hatfield said, especially to work in more remote areas.

    Bees are captured and put in a chilled cooler so they go into a state of lethargy. Diagnostic photos are taken, and the bees are released unharmed when they warm up.

    Bumblebees, unlike honeybees, don’t overwinter in a hive. Bumblebees build nests, typically in holes in the ground, and generally number only a few hundred individuals by the time fall arrives. Any honey they produce they consume.

    With the arrival of winter, all bumblebees die except a few fertilized queen bees that in the spring head out alone to start a new nest and produce worker bees, beginning the cycle over.

    “Here’s a species that spends a big part of its life as a vulnerable queen,” said Andony Melathopoulos of Oregon State University. Bumblebees have “this really fascinating solitary phase.”

    Honeybees are imports from Europe brought in as agricultural workers to pollinate crops. Native bumblebees also help pollinate crops. But when it comes to native North American plants and some crops, the more robust bumblebee with its ability to “buzz” pollinate by grabbing onto an entire flower and shaking the pollen loose is for some plant species the only insect up to the task.

    The Western bumblebee, once considered common and widespread, has disappeared from much of its former range. Clues as to why Western bumblebee populations have plummeted are being sought in the current study.

    “We really don’t know a lot about them,” said Ross Winton of Idaho Fish and Game. “The more we learn, the more concerned we get.”

    The Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas could ultimately be an example for other states interested in learning more about how bumblebees are doing.

    “It is a model for other states,” Melathopoulos said. “Everyone is looking at the Pacific Northwest, and this initiative as a test case.”

    The study is being paid for by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Idaho and Washington, and in Oregon by another government entity called the Foundation for Food and Agricultural Research.

    Collaborators include the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Fish and Game, Oregon State University, The Oregon Bee Project, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Xerces Society, an environmental group that works to conserve invertebrates.

    House Speaker Greg Hughes’ property holdings appear to disqualify him from the inland port board that he appointed himself to


    House Speaker Greg Hughes is affiliated with companies that own land within 5 miles of the newly created inland port authority boundaries — a tie that, under current law, would automatically disqualify him from the board he appointed himself...

    House Speaker Greg Hughes is affiliated with companies that own land within 5 miles of the newly created inland port authority boundaries — a tie that, under current law, would automatically disqualify him from the board he appointed himself to.

    That’s no problem, says Hughes, who is pushing to change the law to shrink that restriction and rid it of what he says is other ambiguous language.

    Hughes is listed on state business records as the manager of Wilkeshire Homes LLC, an expired limited liability company that owns a tiny 0.05 acres at 564 N. 800 West in Salt Lake City. That property is within about 2 miles of the new shipping and receiving hub lawmakers created on more than 20,000 acres of Salt Lake City’s land this year.

    He is also affiliated with a number of apartment developments along 200 West in Salt Lake City’s up-and-coming Central Ninth neighborhood. Measured as the crow flies, the developments are all within the boundary lawmakers set for members of the board of directors that will manage the inland port.

    Even if measuring driving distance, The Holden Apartments at 854 S. 200 West and others in that area appear to be just within the designated conflict zone.

    Senate Bill 234, which created the Utah Inland Port, prohibits board members from owning or having interests in property within 5 miles of what is planned to be one of the world’s largest landlocked rail, truck and air shipping ports.

    Already one board member, Sen. Don Ipson, R-St. George, has resigned as a direct result of that conflict prohibition. Ipson was appointed by Senate President Wayne Niederhauser.

    Hughes appointed himself to the 11-member board this month.

    In an interview Wednesday, Hughes said he had been unaware that his land was within the disqualification boundary until after a contentious inaugural board meeting this week, at which he urged the other members not to elect a chairperson and move forward. He said he found out his land was within the 5-mile buffer the next day, Tuesday.

    Besides that, he said, the bill lawmakers passed on the 44th night of the 45-day legislative session this year contained other vague language that he now argues would disqualify any member of the board.

    For instance, he said, another provision prohibits board members from taking “any action to initiate, negotiate, or otherwise arrange for the acquisition of an interest in real property” within 5 miles of the port. He said that would include members of the unpaid board, which includes Derek Miller, the new president and CEO of the Salt Lake Chamber.

    “My higher priority and my greatest concern is that the way that that statute is written, I think, is problematic for all board members, or those that would be appointed, unless we clarify the language,” Hughes said.

    He added that he wanted the state to be cautious because there has been talk about a potential lawsuit that would challenge the boundaries, creation or operation of the port. And he thought some would use his land ownership to force him off the board out of opposition to the port itself.

    “There’s people that want me off this board like you can’t believe,” he said. “... There are people that want to make this all about me because they don’t want me on this board.”

    The fledgling United Utah Party, intended to be an alternative for Republicans and Democrats disillusioned with polarizing politics, called Wednesday for Hughes to resign because it considers his self-appointment an “egregious violation of the public trust.” Party leaders suggested in a news release — issued before The Tribune scrutinized Hughes’ property holdings — that the speaker could well have a conflict with his development business.

    Senate Minority Leader Gene Davis, D-Salt Lake City, also said Hughes should leave the board if his business dealings are within the 5-mile zone.

    “You’ve set the rules, you have to live by the rules,” Davis said. “If he’s breaking the rules, he needs to make a reappointment.”

    The outgoing speaker’s legislative conflict-of-interest form lists just one company, Steelers Holdings LLC, which is a holding company that serves as a sort of corporate umbrella for a number of other interests for his property management and development business.

    In an interview last year questioning whether Hughes was attempting to get around the intent of the disclosure law — to publicly flag potential conflicts — the speaker said he was unaware some 10 companies were still registered with the state and that was a mistake. He said he was not legally required to list those businesses on his House disclosure form.

    Wilkeshire Homes was not one of the companies identified in the previous Tribune reporting. Its state business license expired in 2007 after not being renewed, but it is still the owner of one of the properties in question.

    Many of the other Hughes-related businesses registered with the state own property in Salt Lake City, according to county property records.

    Hughes was one of the port’s biggest cheerleaders and a relentless behind-the-scenes force in his final session overseeing the Utah House. He has long advocated for the state to control the city’s land, saying the development envisioned in the area was too much for Salt Lake City to handle.

    Business leaders pitched an inland port as a way to connect Utah’s imports and exports — including oil and coal — and those of other states with international and domestic markets.

    They also hope to attract manufacturing and other businesses to locate near or on the development in the northwest part of the capital, a largely vacant swath of undeveloped land at the southern edge of the Great Salt Lake and west of Salt Lake City International Airport.

    The property ownership continues a rocky start for what is being heralded by supporters as the biggest economic development project in state history.

    Yet Hughes might not have had an issue with the boundary if it weren’t for last-minute, largely undebated changes by the House on the eve of the final day of the legislative session.

    The Senate had passed a version of the bill that prohibited board members from owning property within two miles of the port boundaries. The area carved out for the port in that bill was also smaller than in the House version released and passed shortly before 10 p.m. on the 44th day of the 45-day session. The Senate quickly concurred with the heavily amended bill, shocking and angering Salt Lake City leaders.

    Hughes says he was unaware that the buffer was changed from 2 miles to 5 miles in his chamber until an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune.

    Talks between the state and city to iron out differences broke down last month. Hughes and state Sen. Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City, have attempted to push a compromise in continuing negotiations endorsed by the City Council.

    Hughes is now advocating for changes that would include decreasing or eliminating the land ownership buffer but would prohibit ownership within the port’s boundaries.

    “If people want to be critical and they want to find areas to attack this project,” Hughes said, “... we should do our best job of making sure that it’s not vulnerable to those things. We should be looking ahead.”

    — Salt Lake Tribune columnist Robert Gehrke contributed to this report.

    Post Office Place is a new Salt Lake City bar that finally gives Takashi diners a place to get a pre-dinner cocktail

    Post Office Place is a new Salt Lake City bar that finally gives Takashi diners a place to get a pre-dinner cocktail


    Takashi has, after three years, opened Post Office Place, a new bar next to the popular sushi restaurant in downtown Salt Lake City.This is good news for anyone who has waited, and waited, and waited for a table at Takashi — and subsequently cursed...

    Takashi has, after three years, opened Post Office Place, a new bar next to the popular sushi restaurant in downtown Salt Lake City.

    This is good news for anyone who has waited, and waited, and waited for a table at Takashi — and subsequently cursed Utah liquor laws, which prevent restaurant guests from ordering a cocktail before being seated at a table.

    ”We opened it because we wanted it to be a place where people can wait while they are waiting [for a seat] at Takashi,” explained Tamara Gibo, who, along with husband Takashi, owns the restaurant.

    Post Office Place, at 16 W. Market St., is sleek and modern. Its name and menu pay homage to the old post office that once stood across the street.

    “The post office is where cultures collided,” Gibo said of the fusion menu that leans Peruvian but has Asian influences.

    The small plates are “light and clean,” she said, and designed to whet your appetite before a full Takashi meal.

    Look for items such as ceviche, shrimp chowder made with broth (not cream) and, in true fusion fashion, a Peruvian empanada made with an Asian egg roll wrapper.

    Naturally, guests don’t have to be on the waiting list at Takashi to visit Post Office Place, Gibo said. They can visit any day, except Sunday, from 4:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.

    Post Office Place has been three years in the making.

    In 2015, the owners applied for a dining club license from the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Back then, business owners were waiting almost a year for the designation.

    Then, in 2017, the Gibos pulled their DABC application because the Utah Legislature did away with dining clubs, which offered a hybrid between a bar and a restaurant.

    Today, businesses that have the dining club license have until July 1 to decide whether they want to switch to a bar license, which allows only those 21 and older on the premises, or a restaurant liquor license, which requires some sort of barrier preventing minors from sitting too close to the pouring and mixing of alcoholic drinks. In restaurants, people also are required to order food with their drinks.

    Post Office Place also endured usual construction delays — and, on top of that, the Gibos needed time to plan their daughter’s wedding.

    “We had a vision of what we wanted it to be,” Tamara Gibo said, “but we had too much to do all at once. We decided to do it right and take our time.”

    With the opening of Post Office Place, the owners are considering a remodel of Takashi itself. That presents another set of liquor-law dilemmas for the tiny restaurant.

    Takashi did not have the 7-foot barrier — aka Zion Curtain — because it was grandfathered under the old law, Gibo said.

    If it decides to remodel, it will fall under a new liquor statue that requires restaurants to have a 10-foot barrier where minors cannot be seated.

    Once again, customers will be waiting to see how that project plays out. Until then, you can probably find them in the Post Office Place bar having a drink.

    Utah’s minority populations are growing rapidly — adding 130K people in seven years

    Utah’s minority populations are growing rapidly — adding 130K people in seven years


    It’s one sign of how growing minorities are changing Utah. Archie Archuleta, 87, recalls driving as a youth from his hometown of Pocatello, Idaho, to Salt Lake City to shop at what he remembers as the only Latino store for hundreds of miles.“Now they...

    It’s one sign of how growing minorities are changing Utah. Archie Archuleta, 87, recalls driving as a youth from his hometown of Pocatello, Idaho, to Salt Lake City to shop at what he remembers as the only Latino store for hundreds of miles.

    “Now they are everywhere here,” he says. “There are even several chains.”

    Eli Madrigal started one of them, Rancho Markets, in 2006 and now has 10 stores. But as a sign of even more change, she says that “only 50 percent of our customers are Latino.” Her stores are busy by also catering to growing numbers of Asian, African and Middle Eastern immigrants and refugees — plus other Utahns.

    “We specialize in getting items they like” from around the world, she says about the many groups. “We try to serve the entire neighborhood community,” and that means serving increasingly diverse groups and tastes.

    Since the 2010 Census, Utah’s minority population has grown by 129,526 people — the equivalent of adding a city the size of West Valley City, according to new estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau.

    More than one in five Utahns — 21.5 percent to be exact — is now a minority, up by two percentage points since 2010.

    And minority groups are also growing faster than whites.

    Utah’s white population has grown by 9.4 percent since 2010. Minorities overall have grown by 24 percent.

    In part, that’s because the older generations with higher death rates tend to be more white, “and they are being replaced by a more diverse population” in younger generations, says Pam Perlich, director of demographic research at the University of Utah’s Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute.

    Growth by minority group

    Among Utah minorities, Latinos added the most people since 2010 — 75,948 (the equivalent of a city the size of South Jordan), growing by 21.2 percent. As Utah’s largest minority, they now comprise 14 percent of the state population, or 434,288 people.

    Some minorities had faster rates of growth, although they did not add as many people.

    Asians grew by 37.7 percent (or 20,677 more people); mixed-heritage people of two or more races grew by 36.6 percent (17,057 people); blacks, 29.5 percent (7,762 people); Pacific islanders, 23.6 percent (5,702 people); and Native Americans, 8.7 percent (2,380 people).

    While immigration by Latinos is again a hot political topic, Perlich notes that Utah’s “growth in the Hispanic population — which is significant — is really being driving by natural increase [through births], not migration.”

    She said Utah had large waves of Latino immigration in the 1990s, mostly from young people seeking work. The growth among Latinos now is coming from them having children, or their children having children. And Latinos tend to have larger families than Utah whites.

    “Even though there is all of this anti-immigration language about the southern border, Hispanics are still a major part of our community. They are having children. So those populations will continue to grow,” she said.

    Immigration has slowed

    She said data show little-to-no current immigration from Latino countries. “It’s not coming from south of the border as much as rearranging domestically,” such as Latinos moving to Utah from Texas or California.

    “It’s just this slow-motion movie that we’ve been watching for the last two decades where the youth are much more diverse than the elders,” and Utah slowly is becoming more diverse overall, Perlich said.

    “The changes are ongoing, cumulative and irreversible,” she said. “Utah is becoming more multicultural, multilingual and multiethnic.”

    Perlich said she came to Utah in 1986 before its population reached 2 million, and it now has passed 3 million. “Of that last 1 million people, about half the growth came from people who have moved here and their kids. And about half of the people who have moved here have come from international source regions.”

    Changing Utah

    Archuleta, a longtime Latino activist, said while people may not notice slow changes year-to-year, it is truly obvious when he looks back a half century or more.

    For example he moved to Salt Lake City in 1953 to teach at an elementary school on Salt Lake City’s west side that he said had only a handful of Latinos and a couple of Asians.

    “Now all west side schools are 55 percent to 90 percent minority,” he says.

    He also remembers that when he arrived, the entire Salt Lake Valley had maybe four Latino restaurants. Some street corners now have more. “The taco has become king. I’ve read that salsa is more popular than mustard and ketchup as a condiment among kids.”

    Perlich said that growth by minorities “has played out quite differently in communities across our state.”

    For example, she said, “West Valley City is close to becoming a minority-majority city. I would not be surprised to see that in the 2020 Census.”

    San Juan County has long been a minority-majority county, with minorities comprising 56 percent of its population. Navajos account for the largest portion.

    And Perlich notes that “communities on the west side of Salt Lake City are minority-majority.” Overall, Salt Lake County is now 28.6 percent minority, second only to San Juan County. The least-diverse county in Utah was Morgan, where minorities make up only 4.9 percent of the population.

    Data on age

    Besides new data on race, the Census Bureau also released new estimates on age.

    As has been the case for decades, Utah again has the nation’s youngest median age: 30.9 years. But it is rising slowly over time, including being up from 30.8 in 2016.

    The state’s large youth population has long been attributed to the Mormon culture in Utah, which traditionally has large families — although they have been shrinking in recent years. The large families of minority residents also contributes to the young median age.

    Utah County had the youngest median age: 24.8 years. The highest median age was in Piute County: 48.3 years. Several rural counties where younger people have been moving away to find work have median ages over 40 — including Piute, Daggett, Garfield, Kane, Wayne and Grand.

    Gehrke: Trump’s nomination of a controversial Utahn to head U.S. refugee programs appears to be dead

    Gehrke: Trump’s nomination of a controversial Utahn to head U.S. refugee programs appears to be dead


    We all got to celebrate World Refugee Day on Wednesday, although the best news for U.S. policy toward refugees may have actually come a day earlier.Two senators — Arizona Republican John McCain and Delaware Democrat Chris Coons — sent a letter to...

    We all got to celebrate World Refugee Day on Wednesday, although the best news for U.S. policy toward refugees may have actually come a day earlier.

    Two senators — Arizona Republican John McCain and Delaware Democrat Chris Coons — sent a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Tuesday indicating strong opposition to the nomination of Ron Mortensen, a Utahn, to lead the State Department’s refugee programs.

    And they didn’t pull any punches.

    “We are deeply concerned about the possibility of a virulent opponent of immigration serving as the United States’ senior diplomat for migration and refugee policies,” they wrote. “At a time when more than 65 million people are displaced worldwide, the nomination of Mr. Mortensen for this position sends a chilling message to all those around the world who look to the United States as a beacon of hope and security for persecuted peoples.”

    McCain’s opposition is not a shock, since Mortensen once wrote that the senator “rolled out the welcome mat for ISIS” terrorists to come through the southern border because he was soft on enforcement.

    My colleague Thomas Burr also reported this week that Gov. Gary Herbert made his opposition to Mortensen’s nomination known to the White House.

    “We reached out to let them know that in no way could we support Ron in that kind of position because he doesn’t represent Utah values in terms of how we think about immigration,” Paul Edwards, Herbert’s deputy chief of staff, said.

    The Salt Lake Chamber also called on the Trump administration to withdraw Mortensen from consideration.

    The nomination of Mortensen, who has a long and well-documented record of inflammatory rhetoric and a hard-line stance on illegal immigration, was a jaw-dropper, coming without the normal consultation or even a heads-up to Utah Sens. Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee.

    Hatch and Lee on Wednesday again avoided the question of whether they would support Mortensen’s nomination.

    But it doesn’t really matter at this point.

    With McCain joining fellow Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake — who had already voiced his opposition — this nomination is as good as dead.

    Democrats would almost certainly demand he get 60 votes for confirmation, and the opposition from the two Arizona Republicans leaves Mortensen short of even 50 votes. No senator has yet expressed support for the pick.

    And with Utah’s senators seemingly willing to let his nomination wither, it’s unlikely that Mortensen will ever get a confirmation hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

    The position Mortensen was nominated to fill is perhaps more important now than ever before. Globally, as the senators noted, there are some 65 million people displaced because of unrest in their homelands, from places such as Syria and El Salvador.

    Yet the United States is flatly refusing to take a leading role in solving the humanitarian crisis, capping the number of refugees who will be allowed in this country at a historic low — 45,000. For the first time since the Vietnam War, we will not lead the world in refugee resettlement.

    Instead, the administration is imposing “extreme vetting” and travel bans, while it shrugs at an incomprehensible scale of human suffering.

    The State Department on Wednesday sought to mark World Refugee Day by touting U.S. leadership.

    “We will continue to help the world’s most vulnerable refugees, reflecting the deeply held values of the American people,” the statement from Secretary Pompeo read in part.

    But Mortensen — who advocates for deportation of young people whose parents brought them to this country illegally; who castigated The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for joining the Utah Compact, which calls for humane policies that keep families together; and who has argued that most undocumented immigrants “routinely” commit felonies — is a nominee who is starkly out of touch with those “deeply held values of the American people.”

    All of that seems plain enough for the average person to see, but perhaps not surprising that an administration that cages thousands of children of families seeking asylum in so-called “tender age shelters” doesn’t seem to grasp it.

    Fortunately, Flake, McCain, Coons, Herbert and likely several others understand that reality and — as shocking as it may seem in today’s Washington — the system appears to have worked.

    Jennifer Rubin: Trump caves, embarrassing his lying sycophants again

    Jennifer Rubin: Trump caves, embarrassing his lying sycophants again


    The Washington Post reports:“President Trump abruptly reversed course Wednesday, saying he would sign an executive order ending family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border after a public uproar over the impact of his administration’s ‘zero...

    The Washington Post reports:

    “President Trump abruptly reversed course Wednesday, saying he would sign an executive order ending family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border after a public uproar over the impact of his administration’s ‘zero tolerance’ immigration policy.

    “The plan would keep families together in federal custody while awaiting prosecution for illegal border crossings, potentially violating a 1997 court settlement limiting the duration of child detentions.

    ”‘So we’re going to have strong, very strong borders, but we’re going to keep the families together,’” Trump said as he signed the order in the Oval Office. ” ‘I didn’t like the sight or the feeling of families being separated.’ ”

    As a preliminary matter, Trump’s “solution” is not going to work unless the process for determining the children’s parents’ status is sped up. The initial problem, caused by Trump’s “zero tolerance” remains in effect, and has resulted in an unmanageable number of people who would otherwise not be held over for prosecution.

    As The Post’s report mentions, the order likely will lead to violations of the 1997 “Flores” settlement, which prohibits detaining children beyond 20 days. It seems the anti-immigrant hard-liners have decided to fight Flores, the result being the incarceration of families for weeks or even months. Moreover, “U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) operates two large detention centers for families in Texas and a smaller one in Pennsylvania, but their combined capacity is about 3,000 beds. As of mid-June, the three centers were nearly full, meaning ICE would potentially need to place children in its much larger network of immigration jails for adults. That would most likely violate the [settlement] agreement that limits the government’s ability to keep children in detention and orders them to be placed in [the] least-restrictive setting possible.”

    It’s absurd to turn around and fight Flores when the problem is the draconian policy that requires mass housing, feeding and care of immigrant families. The administration still has no real plans to address that financial and logistical problem before locking up immigrants, including asylum seekers. (It would be as if the federal government turned jaywalking into a felony and then built no facilities to hold violators.)

    As a political matter, Trump once more turns his sycophantic spinners into chumps. They spent days insisting only Congress could fix this. That was a lie, as the executive order demonstrates. The Post’s Aaron Blake explains: “It’s at once an admission that the politics of the issue had gotten out of hand and that the administration’s arguments were completely dishonest. Virtually everything it said about the policy is tossed aside with this executive action. It’s the political equivalent of waving the white flag and the legal equivalent of confessing to making false statements.”

    Unfortunately, few interviewers will press the Trump team on their lies, who will quickly shift to the “Problem solved!” talking point. Let us not forget, however, that the president, Department of Homeland Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and the many Trump apologists in Congress and on Fox News and other conservative outlets have lost all credibility on the issue. Their behavior throughout has shocked Americans’ collective conscience.

    We are also left with question as to whether the “zero tolerance” policy is constitutional as it is being implemented and whether the administration is equipped to care - at huge taxpayer expense - for those who came here desperate to escape from their home countries. There was already a significant issue as to whether separating children was constitutionally permissible; the question of whether their new housing meets constitutional standards now will be litigated, no doubt. Simply putting children with their parents does not end the question of the constitutionality of their and their family’s detention for an indefinite period of time.

    Let’s not lose track in discussing legalities of the human toll that Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy is taking. No other administration has suspended prosecutorial discretion to incarcerate thousands of people (some with children and some without) for no other reason than trying to escape hardship. Until we have a sufficiently large and competent immigration system to process these people, we have no business detaining them (kids or no kids) in facilities never meant to be inhabited for any length of time.

    One final point: Each and every child taken into U.S. custody must be accounted for and returned to his or her parent. Losing or orphaning hundreds of children is its own form of child abuse and should not be tolerated. Until all children are reunited with their families, and until children as well as adults are provided with adequate housing, food, medical care and so on, this remains an ongoing human-rights disaster.

    Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Washington Post, offering reported opinion from a center-right perspective.

    Political Cornflakes: White House alerts Secret Service after Peter Fonda suggests caging Trump’s son


    White House alerts Secret Service after Peter Fonda suggests caging Trump’s son. Poll: Romney has a 42-point lead over Kennedy. Cox’s tweet goes viral over border separations. Happy Thursday. Actor Peter Fonda may have to answer to the Secret Service...

    White House alerts Secret Service after Peter Fonda suggests caging Trump’s son. Poll: Romney has a 42-point lead over Kennedy. Cox’s tweet goes viral over border separations.

    Happy Thursday. Actor Peter Fonda may have to answer to the Secret Service soon after the White House alerted the agency about his tweet calling for President Donald Trump’s youngest son, Barron, to be locked up “with pedophiles … see if mother will stand up against the giant a--hole she is married to.” A spokeswoman for first lady Melania Trump called the tweet “sick and irresponsible.” [Politico]

    Topping the news: Mitt Romney has a 42-point lead over state Rep. Mike Kennedy ahead of the Republican primary on Tuesday, a new Tribune-Hinckley Institute poll shows. [Trib]

    -> Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox received international attention when a string of emotional tweets about separating children from their parents at the border went viral. [Trib]

    -> A Provo man who fled Guatemala after kidnappers held him captive recalls being separated from his 3-year-old daughter for seven days at the U.S.-Mexico border. [APviaTrib]

    -> House Speaker Greg Hughes is affiliated with companies that own land near the newly created inland port authority boundaries, which, according to Utah law, should disqualify him from serving on the port board. [Trib]

    -> The Utah Safe Schools Commission issued a report on tips for protecting students, including mandatory mental-health reporting and allowing guns to be seized through court order. [Trib] [Fox13]

    Tweets of the day: From @funder: “Trump literally signed an executive order to end Trump’s own policy. Mind blown.”

    -> From @feministfabulous: "Donald Trump is taking credit for solving a crisis he created. Gaslighting at its highest form.”

    -> From @petridishes: "’only I can break it and then claim credit for fixing it’ doesn’t have quite the same ring“

    Trib Talk: Tribune reporter Benjamin Wood discusses border security and the separation of migrant families with Arturo Morales-LLan, a member of the Utah Republican Party’s State Central Committee, and Luis Garza, executive director of Comunidades Unidas.

    In other news: A security guard for Citadel Security USA shot and killed a man outside a government building and is being charged with murder. [Trib] [DNews] [Fox13] [ABC4]

    -> State Sen. Jim Dabakis voted against a judicial nominee yesterday -- and says he’ll continue to do so -- over concern for a lack of diversity on the bench. [Fox13]

    -> Utah will receive $35 million of a $15.7 billion settlement that Volkswagen was ordered to pay after the German automaker was found to have cheated emission tests for years. [Trib]

    -> Lt. Gov. Cox and medical marijuana supporters are asking a judge to toss out a lawsuit trying to prevent the ballot initiative. [Fox13]

    -> A 0.25 percent tax increase for Salt Lake County will be imposed after Draper and Sandy city councils voted in favor of the hike, despite opposition from Sandy City Mayor Kurt Bradburn. [Trib]

    -> According to the National Park Service, there were 324 search and rescue operations at Utah national parks in 2017, a 68 percent jump from 2014. [Trib]

    -> Democratic Navajo candidate Willie Grayeyes filed a lawsuit challenging San Juan County’s decision to end his campaign, arguing it was a racially and politically motivated attack. [Trib] [Fox13]

    -> The LDS Church released a list of new guidelines for bishops conducting interviews with teenagers, including letting them know before the interview what they will be asked. [Trib]

    -> Pat Bagley shows the “deficit deceit” that has been happening while everyone is focused by immigration reform. [Trib]

    Nationally: In the face of bipartisan protest, President Donald Trump signed an executive order temporarily to temporarily halt the policy of separating children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. [Politico] [NYTimes]

    -> Economists say the U.S.’s strong economy gives Trump an upper hand as he contemplates tariffs on China, Canada and Mexico. [NYTimes]

    -> The White House is expected today to propose merging the Education and Labor Departments, a plan that is expected to include major changes to the way the government provides benefits for low-income Americans. [WaPost]

    Got a tip? A birthday, wedding or anniversary to announce? Send us a note to [email protected].

    -- Thomas Burr and Connor Richards

    Twitter.com/thomaswburr and Twitter.com/crichards1995

    Anne Applebaum: In Trump’s world, morality is for losers

    Anne Applebaum: In Trump’s world, morality is for losers


    “Virtue-signaling” is a snide little phrase that people vaguely of the “right” invented to tease people vaguely of the “left.” Like “limousine liberal” or “champagne socialist,” it implies insincerity and self-righteousness.Those who...

    “Virtue-signaling” is a snide little phrase that people vaguely of the “right” invented to tease people vaguely of the “left.” Like “limousine liberal” or “champagne socialist,” it implies insincerity and self-righteousness.

    Those who brag about doing something good — say, riding their bicycle to work every day — are said to be “virtue-signaling” their desire to fight climate change. Politicians who join Twitter campaigns in support of worthy causes are said to be “virtue-signaling” their belief in their own superiority.

    More recently the British journalist Nick Cohen has identified another way of sending social messages. This is something he called “vice-signaling,” and it is precisely the opposite tactic. It applies to politicians who do something evil — deliberately — with the aim of proving they really are very sincere indeed.

    Cohen invented it in the context of an immigration scandal in Britain which had led not to the deportation of illegal immigrants, but to the deportation of actual British citizens, albeit with poor documentation. When uncovered, the policy led to a scandal and the resignation of the home secretary, Amber Rudd. Cohen argued, nevertheless, that the policy had never been a mistake or an accident: The Conservative Party had decided to pursue cruel and unfair tactics on immigration, precisely in order to “signal” to their base their seriousness about fighting immigration.

    This is a useful context in which to understand the reasoning behind the Trump administration’s horrific policy on family separation at the border — a policy that, if it were enacted in another country, would be described by American officials as state-sponsored child abuse. It’s incomprehensibly cruel, separating small children from their parents and sending them to institutions that resemble jails.

    Worse, the confusion around the policy is such that some of the children may eventually be lost — or worse. It’s a policy unprecedented in recent American history; Laura Bush, the former first lady, had to reach back to the 1940s, to internment camps for U.S. citizens and noncitizens of Japanese descent during World War II, for a comparison. Another parallel might be the removal of children from black slaves before the Civil War.

    The president and his team know exactly how evil this policy is: If they didn’t, myriad officials wouldn’t be blaming it, dishonestly, on the Democrats; or pretending that Congress can solve the problem when it has actually been created by the Trump administration; or ludicrously arguing, as the Fox News pundit Laura Ingraham has done, that the child jails resemble “boarding schools.”

    At the same time, the president and his team persist in pursuing it. Why? Because it signals to their base that they are really serious about stopping immigration — so serious that they will abuse children, damage families, and shock anybody who cares about civil rights or human rights in the United States or elsewhere. It’s not an accident that this policy has been attributed to Stephen Miller, the Trump adviser who has made a career out of using scandalous language and creating “happenings” designed to shock his peers. This kind of trolling is often a form of vice-signaling too. “Look,” it tells supporters, “here’s how nasty I am prepared to be.”

    Will Trump’s base respond to it? Right now, nearly 30 percent of Americans say they support the policy — and, it seems, a majority of Republicans. It’s easy enough to find approving comments, even enthusiastically approving comments, on Breitbart or Twitter. Those who like it argue, more or less, that this is a hard-nosed policy, a reflection of how tough and strong we are, proof that we are willing to risk the good opinion of the nation and the world — and, of course, a demonstration of how little we care about the children of would-be immigrants.

    Trump’s admirers see no moral case: Morality is for losers, apparently. Cruelty is for winners. And this will be the long-term effect of vice-signaling: It makes its proponents, and its audiences, vicious themselves.

    Anne Applebaum is a Washington Post columnist, covering national politics and foreign policy, with a special focus on Europe and Russia. She is also a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and a professor of practice at the London School of Economics. She is a former member of The Washington Post’s editorial board.

    Rich Lowry: Harvard’s anti-Asian-American microaggression

    Rich Lowry: Harvard’s anti-Asian-American microaggression


    The Harvard University admissions process appears to be an ongoing microaggression against Asian-Americans.A group called Students for Fair Admissions is suing the school for alleged racial discrimination and has filed documents in federal court making a...

    The Harvard University admissions process appears to be an ongoing microaggression against Asian-Americans.

    A group called Students for Fair Admissions is suing the school for alleged racial discrimination and has filed documents in federal court making a persuasive case, based on data provided by the school.

    Harvard denies it, but one of the imperatives of the affirmative action regime in college admissions is that schools never admit what they are doing.

    The great and good at Harvard will insist that Asian-Americans all be called by their preferred pronouns, but they won’t afford them equal treatment in the admissions process. They will upbraid anyone daring to ask an Asian-American where he is from, but will, in effect, hold his ethnic background against him.

    And they will do it by relying on the stereotype of Asian-Americans as dull, unrelatable “model students.”

    According to the analysis of Duke University economist Peter Arcidiacono, an expert for the plaintiffs, an Asian-American applicant who is a male, is not economically disadvantaged and has, based on his other characteristics, a 25 percent chance of getting in would see his odds markedly increase if he belonged to another group. His chances of admission would be 36 percent if he were white; 77 percent if he were Hispanic; and 95 percent if he were black.

    Why is this? Among Harvard applicants, Asian-Americans have the highest average SAT scores and the highest academic index, combining the SAT and high-school performance. Somehow, though, they manage the lowest admission rates.

    They supposedly fall down on their personal ratings, which includes the question of whether the applicants have a “positive personality.”

    It just so happens that, per Harvard, otherwise high-achieving Asian-Americans are beset by chronically negative personalities. It’s amazing that they somehow manage to do well in school and extensively participate in extracurricular activities despite their glum outlook and downbeat personas. Alumni interviewers who actually meet them tend to rate them highly. No matter.

    Harvard’s “holistic” approach to admissions allows it to adjust the knobs to get the demographic mix that it prefers. There’s precedent for this. In the 1920s, as a report of the Center for Equal Opportunity notes, Harvard changed its admissions process away from an exclusive focus on academics to considering the whole person, which allowed it to reverse an unwelcome run-up in Jewish admissions and keep the percentage of Jews in the student body at about 15 percent for decades.

    Like the Jews before them, Asian-Americans are deemed “unclubbable” by many elite universities seeking to keep their admissions down.

    The Center for Equal Opportunity report notes the contrast between Caltech, which doesn’t have affirmative action, and Harvard, which does. At Caltech, Asian-Americans make up more than 40 percent of undergraduates, a proportion that has grown robustly since 2000. At Harvard, Asian-American representation topped out at 21 percent in 1993, before dipping below 20 percent for a couple of decades (it’s now 22 percent).

    A 2013 internal Harvard analysis, according to the lawsuit, said that Asian-Americans would make up 43 percent of admissions if academics alone were the factor.

    If Harvard applied its own standards to Harvard, it would be appalled by how it’s disadvantaging members of a minority group. It would encourage protests. It would refer itself for racial bias training. It would apologize and grovel and hope it all could be a teaching moment. But none of this will happen because it could lead to the admission of “too many Asians,” the scenario that its admissions policies and related subterfuge are designed to prevent.

    The lawsuit includes an exchange with a teacher at exclusive Stuyvesant High School in New York City who breaks down and cries when she’s shown data on how much less likely her Asian students are to make it into Harvard. She’s upset by the unfairness of it — would that Harvard felt the same way.

    Rich Lowry can be reached via e-mail: [email protected]

    George F. Will: Can Bill Weld restore conservatism?

    George F. Will: Can Bill Weld restore conservatism?


    Washington • ”This,” exclaimed Margaret Thatcher, thumping Friedrich Hayek’s 500-page tome “The Constitution of Liberty” on a table in front of some Conservative Party colleagues, “is what we believe.” It also is what Bill Weld believes,...

    Washington • ”This,” exclaimed Margaret Thatcher, thumping Friedrich Hayek’s 500-page tome “The Constitution of Liberty” on a table in front of some Conservative Party colleagues, “is what we believe.” It also is what Bill Weld believes, which is why he aspires to be the Libertarian Party’s 2020 presidential candidate.

    The former twice-elected Republican governor of Massachusetts has been visiting Libertarian Party state conventions and will be in New Orleans at the national convention June 30 - July 3. There he will try to convince the party, which sometimes is too interested in merely sending a message (liberty is good), to send into the autumn of 2020 a candidate representing what a broad swath of Americans say they favor — limited government, fiscal responsibility, free trade, the rule of law, entitlement realism and other artifacts from the Republican wreckage.

    Once when a Democrat noted that Weld’s ancestors had arrived on the Mayflower, Weld replied, “Actually, they weren’t on the Mayflower. They sent the servants over first to get the cottage ready.” He was the 19th Weld — the first was in the Class of 1650 — to graduate from Harvard. Since then, the 20th and 21st have attended — two of the five children he had with his first wife, Theodore Roosevelt’s great-granddaughter. Two Harvard buildings are named for Welds. One of which John Kennedy lived as a freshman.

    Bill Weld, who majored in classics, took philosophy classes from Robert Nozick, whose “Anarchy, State and Utopia,” a canonical text of libertarianism, argues that “the minimal state is inspiring as well as right.” Weld served in Ronald Reagan’s administration for seven years, five years as U.S. attorney for Massachusetts. He was recommended for this position by then-Associate U.S. Attorney General Rudy Giuliani, which was not Weld’s fault. Next, Weld was head of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. There he brought from San Francisco, as his replacement in Massachusetts, a man “who might be the straightest guy I’ve ever met,” Robert Mueller.

    Weld’s sandy-reddish hair is still abundant and, at 72, he is eager to build on his 2016 experience as the Libertarians’ vice-presidential nominee. During that campaign, “I carried around with me every day” the 10th Amendment: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” Noting that the Articles of Confederation excellently referred to powers not “expressly” delegated, Weld says, “I might have been an anti-Federalist.” Imagine having a president who knows that there were anti-Federalists.

    The top of the Libertarians’ 2016 ticket was another ex-governor, New Mexico’s Gary Johnson, who was too interested in marijuana and not interested enough in Syria to recognize the name Aleppo. Weld, however, is ready for prime time.

    During a recent breakfast at the Hay-Adams hotel across Lafayette Square from the White House (the Adamses reached these shores shortly after the Welds), Weld recalled how as governor he taught agencies to not expect “last year’s appropriation plus 5 percent.” He cut taxes 21 times and raised none. A believer in freedom for what Nozick called “capitalist acts between consenting adults,” Weld says his most satisfying achievement was cutting the 6 percent tax on long-term capital gains by 1 point for each year the asset is held.

    If the florid face of today’s snarling GOP wants to be re-nominated, he will be. Five-hundred days into his presidency he had 87 percent approval among Republicans, 10 points above Ronald Reagan’s rating at 500 days. And in the autumn of 2019, upward of 20 Democratic presidential aspirants might clog the stages at “debates” that could become contests to see who can most arrestingly pander to activists — a disproportionate slice of the nominating electorate — who are enamored of “Medicare for all,” government-guaranteed jobs, and generally gobs of free stuff (college tuition, etc.).

    If in autumn 2020 voters face a second consecutive repulsive choice, there will be running room between the two deplorables. Because of its 2016 efforts, the Libertarian Party will automatically be on 39 states’ ballots this fall and has a sufficient infantry of volunteers to secure ballot access in another nine. So, if the Libertarian Party is willing, 2020′s politics could have an ingredient recently missing from presidential politics: fun. And maybe a serious disruption of the party duopoly that increasing millions find annoying. Stranger things have happened, as a glance across Lafayette Square confirms.

    George Will’s email address is [email protected]

    Letter: ‘Space Force’ is an immoral waste of money


    The United States does not need to spend more money that it doesn’t have to create a new branch of the military. It already has a space program that has accomplished amazing feats of international cooperation that we can be proud of as a...

    The United States does not need to spend more money that it doesn’t have to create a new branch of the military. It already has a space program that has accomplished amazing feats of international cooperation that we can be proud of as a country.

    Militarizing outer space by creating a “Space Force” is morally wrong when there are citizens of the United States who lack food, housing, basic health care and education. Let’s start by taking care of our citizens instead of creating new ways to start wars.

    Rachel White, Salt Lake City

    Letter: Speak up, religious leaders


    Given the inhumanity of separating children from parents by the United States government led by U.S. Republican leaders, where is the general outcry from the country’s religious leaders?We expect some politicians to be feckless, but not religious...

    Given the inhumanity of separating children from parents by the United States government led by U.S. Republican leaders, where is the general outcry from the country’s religious leaders?

    We expect some politicians to be feckless, but not religious leaders entrusted to defend moral and ethical behavior against those who would commit crimes against humanity.

    Chuck Wullstein, Salt Lake City

    Letter: Utah’s Diesel Brothers have committed unfathomable offenses against our air quality


    I applaud Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment for taking action against the inexplicably ignorant, and rightly illegal, tampering with emission control devices on diesel vehicles by the Diesel Brothers of Sparks Motors Company of Davis County....

    I applaud Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment for taking action against the inexplicably ignorant, and rightly illegal, tampering with emission control devices on diesel vehicles by the Diesel Brothers of Sparks Motors Company of Davis County.

    Northern Utah experiences some of the worst air pollution in the country, most of which comes from motor vehicle emissions. To deliberately alter a vehicle to emit even greater amounts of toxic gases and particulate is an unfathomable offense against all of us.

    Every vehicle manufacturer, those who make aftermarket modifications, and we who ultimately buy and operate them must make a concerted and conscientious effort to reduce pollution. For the Diesel Brothers’ attorneys to argue that tampering with emission control devices “isn’t a big part of their business” is like the cartels saying that murder isn’t a big part of pushing drugs.

    Lew Hansen, South Weber

    Letter: Salt Lake County politicians refuse to listen to the will of the people


    Sandy City voting to approve a $58 million transportation tax stands as yet another example of state and local government ignoring the will of the people.Just three years ago, Salt Lake County taxpayers united to say no to a transportation tax and...

    Sandy City voting to approve a $58 million transportation tax stands as yet another example of state and local government ignoring the will of the people.

    Just three years ago, Salt Lake County taxpayers united to say no to a transportation tax and express their displeasure and dissatisfaction toward the ineptly run and over-bloated UTA.

    Nevertheless, the state Legislature passed SB136, which allowed county councils to go around the voters’ wishes expressed in voting down Proposition 1.

    This is unacceptable. The state and local government will stop at nothing to force measures down the throats of citizens even when they voted no in the first place. Why even has a proposition vote if county leaders are not going to heed the will of the people?

    In the future, please join me in electing people who will actually listen to the will of the people.

    D. Harrison Roe, Salt Lake City

    Letter: If it’s evil, it’s not an acceptable policy


    Immigration issues are complex. Solutions run across the political spectrum. A solution that is evil can never be politically acceptable.The Rev. Martin Diaz, Salt Lake...

    Immigration issues are complex. Solutions run across the political spectrum. A solution that is evil can never be politically acceptable.

    The Rev. Martin Diaz, Salt Lake City

    Letter: Trump axed Bears Ears; now he’s taking down Lady Liberty


    I would like to suggest one more national monument for Trump and Zinke to get rid of.The Statue of Liberty.Doug Campbell, Grover...

    I would like to suggest one more national monument for Trump and Zinke to get rid of.

    The Statue of Liberty.

    Doug Campbell, Grover

    Letter: Bigotry is on the menu at Provo’s Freedom Festival


    F. Burton Howard, it’s unfortunate that you have such a sour taste in your mouth resulting from what you see as disparagement of America’s Freedom Festival.Shall we assume you find exclusion, bias, bigotry and discrimination to be far more delicious?...

    F. Burton Howard, it’s unfortunate that you have such a sour taste in your mouth resulting from what you see as disparagement of America’s Freedom Festival.

    Shall we assume you find exclusion, bias, bigotry and discrimination to be far more delicious? Bon appetit!

    Doug Balli, Emigration Canyon

    Navajo Democrat files suit against San Juan County after he was kicked off the special election ballot


    Officials of Republican-controlled San Juan County said they had “clear and convincing evidence” to boot a Democratic Navajo candidate from the November ballot. (He says they didn’t.)They said he’s not a Utah resident and isn’t qualified to run...

    Officials of Republican-controlled San Juan County said they had “clear and convincing evidence” to boot a Democratic Navajo candidate from the November ballot. (He says they didn’t.)

    They said he’s not a Utah resident and isn’t qualified to run for the open commission seat for which he won the nomination. (He says he is.)

    They said the determination had nothing to do with race. (He says it does.)

    Now, Willie Grayeyes intends to present his side with a lawsuit filed Wednesday challenging the rural southeastern Utah county’s decision to end his campaign, requesting it reinstate his candidacy and accusing it of launching a racially and politically motivated attack.

    “San Juan County has long denied the right of Native Americans to fully participate in the election process,” said Grayeyes’ attorney, Steven Boos.

    It’s an extraordinary battle playing out as San Juan sorts through how to hold an election after its political system was turned upside down by a federal court’s intervention. Judge Robert Shelby ordered in December that the county vacate all commission and school board seats this year and hold a special election under new voting boundaries, meant to reverse the historic political domination there by whites over American Indians (who make up at least 50 percent of the population, according to 2010 U.S. Census data).

    The redrawn districts give Navajos, who tend to affiliate as Democrats, a significant majority of voters in two of three commission districts and three of five school board seats. Grayeyes, who won his party’s nomination for the commission race in March, was running in District 2 — which previously had an Anglo majority of voters and now, for the first time in three decades, has a Native American majority.

    It’s also the only commission race that will have a contest between a Democrat and a Republican.

    In the predominantly white District 1, only conservatives are running. And in the mostly Navajo District 3, only liberal candidates. But that ideological — and largely racial — shakeup from the new boundaries has riled Republicans, who have always been the dominant political party in this desert corner of the state and are now looking at losing their hold over it, particularly if Grayeyes wins.

    “Grayeyes’ candidacy for county commissioner in District 2 therefore reflects a judicially-endorsed reality that members of the Navajo Nation for the first time since statehood will be able to achieve actual representation of Native American interests,” the lawsuit reads.

    Neither Grayeyes nor the county’s spokeswoman could be reached for comment Wednesday.

    The candidate came under the microscope in March after a white resident in Blanding, who lost her bid for the same seat at the county’s GOP convention, filed a complaint claiming that Grayeyes lives in Arizona. He then submitted to the county a satellite image of his house in the Navajo Mountain community on the Navajo Nation reservation within Utah’s borders, a record of his longtime voter registration, a copy of his 1946 birth certificate and a document showing his cattle ranching operations in the region.

    The state elections director, too, confirmed he’d cast ballots dating back at least 26 years. The county Democratic Party chairman vouched for his residency of at least 34 years.

    San Juan County Clerk John David Nielson wrote in a letter to Grayeyes dated May 4 that it was not enough. A sheriff’s deputy, he said, visited the property Grayeyes listed on his candidacy form. No one answered the door, and the dirt driveway did not appear to have “recent tire tracks” or footprints. Neighbors in the largely unpopulated and spread-out community, too, reported not knowing Grayeyes or suggested that he often stays in Tuba City, Ariz.

    “I find that this evidence sufficiently rebuts the presumption of residency arising from your previous voter status,” Nielson concluded (though he acknowledged when the deputy visited Grayeyes’ supposed residence in Arizona, no one was there either). The clerk then booted the candidate from the ballot and voided his voter registration.

    Grayeyes has alleged that the county is just “trying to get me off the candidacy.” His lawyers have called the county’s decision discriminatory and its proof flimsy. Most of the neighbors in the deputy’s report are anonymous, they say. The anecdotes are circumstantial, they say. And an employee of the sheriff’s office should never have been sent out to investigate the civil matter, they say.

    San Juan’s clerk and attorney, as well as the sheriff’s deputy and the woman who filed the original complainant against the candidate, are all named as defendants. They are also, as the attorneys note, all white Republican residents.

    “All are identified with the historically-entrenched political forces in San Juan County, which have fought redistricting in federal court and continue to resist implementation of Judge Shelby’s order, including the candidacy of Grayeyes as a spokesperson for and prominent racial and ethnic symbol of that order,” the lawsuit reads.

    It accuses Kendall Laws, too, of using his political position as the county’s attorney to influence the election through this action. His father, Kelly Laws, is Grayeyes’ Republican opponent in the race. Laws has recused himself from the case and turned the criminal investigation of the candidate over to Davis County.

    Grayeyes has been a member of the Utah Navajo Commission for years, which requires state residency. He has also been a vocal supporter of the original Bears Ears National Monument designation — which the county strongly opposed — and sits on the board for Utah Diné Bikéyah. His lawyers suggest disqualifying him from the ballot was retribution for that activism. Alliance for a Better Utah doubled down on the argument Wednesday.

    “It is no secret that Mr. Grayeyes is an outspoken advocate for many issues impacting his community in San Juan County, and these attempts to keep him from running for office by those who stand to lose politically is a clear abuse of power,” said the organization’s founder, Josh Kanter.

    The candidate was the Democratic nominee for the seat in 2012. His residency was also challenged then, but the complaint was overruled by then-San Juan County Clerk Norman Johnson. Grayeyes has a post office box in Arizona, which services much of the Navajo Reservation where he lives. That, he has suggested, might be the source of the complaint. But he said he’s lived at his current home for 20 years and intends to “remain there permanently and indefinitely.”

    The state requires a candidate to live full-time in the district for at least one year as of the date of the election. If Grayeyes is determined not to be a state resident after a court challenge, the local party would have until the end of August to select a new candidate to run.

    The Jazz found a winner in Donovan Mitchell in last year’s draft — can they do it again?


    In Utah, there’s no Process. But there is trust.A year after being perched on the edge of backsliding, the Jazz are entering the 2018 NBA Draft from a position of strength: They have stars. They’ve been back to the playoffs. With the 21st overall...

    In Utah, there’s no Process. But there is trust.

    A year after being perched on the edge of backsliding, the Jazz are entering the 2018 NBA Draft from a position of strength: They have stars. They’ve been back to the playoffs. With the 21st overall pick, the Jazz won’t be in position to draft the most-talked-about prospects, but many draft experts believe there are useful players in their draft range Thursday night.

    So much of Utah’s strength is derived from last year’s success: General manager Dennis Lindsey and his staff changed the direction of the franchise when they traded for the 13th pick in Donovan Mitchell. Because of that coup, the Jazz don’t need to hit another winning lottery ticket like they did that night — but there’s confidence in the team’s leadership to find another piece.

    At the top, the 2018 draft class seems anachronistic: There are four centers or power forwards who could go in the top five picks, which is counter to the common notion that the NBA is getting smaller.

    But in Utah’s range, it’s almost all guards and wings. While the Jazz could be looking to replace Derrick Favors if he leaves in free agency, the prospect of adding more wing threats — as long as they can play alongside Mitchell — has to be appealing for a team that could use more flexibility in those areas.

    Houston was able to run the Jazz off the floor in the playoffs after injuries to Ricky Rubio and Dante Exum limited Utah’s playmaking options. The draft is likely to offer a player who can shoot, pass — or both.

    “There are a lot of guys in that 20 to 40 range who can really play,” ESPN analyst Mike Schmitz said in a conference call. “There’s guys like [Kyle] Kuzma and Donovan Mitchell and Jarrett Allen who you didn’t expect, so I think there are some of those guys in this draft, whether it’s guys who can shoot or protect the room or really facilitate. I think this is a very deep draft in that range.”

    The Jazz feel that way, too: Vice president of player personnel Walt Perrin told reporters last week there were as many as a dozen prospects the Jazz liked in their range. But the Jazz also feel many of the players they value could be off the board by the time they pick in the first round.

    “I would imagine out of those 10-12 guys that at least six to eight will probably be off the board,” Perrin said.

    The complicating factor could be trades. Several draft analysts, such as ESPN’s Jonathan Givony, are predicting a flurry of activity after the first few picks. Prospects who have been linked to the Jazz, including Maryland’s Kevin Huerter and UCLA’s Aaron Holiday, have seen their stock rising. It’s hard to read which teams really like which players at times — Perrin said “the Liar’s Club is open” this time of year — but there’s a chance teams might be trying to jump in line for a hot prospect.

    What increases the likelihood of trades is the salary cap, which is rising less for next season than in previous years. That means a number of teams are limited in their ability to fill gaps through free agency. It might be cheaper to trade up into the draft for a dynamo on a rookie contract than to spend millions in what’s widely considered a weak free agent market outside of LeBron James and Paul George.

    Particularly in Utah’s range, where shooters can be found in the draft, rookies will be slotted for around $2 million per year.

    “I think that outweighs a team that wants to go out and spend $5 or $6 million on a veteran shooter,” ESPN analyst Bobby Marks said on a conference call.

    If there is a heavy trading market, history says the Jazz could be involved. Last year, the Jazz spun several trades before landing with Mitchell and North Carolina big man Tony Bradley. The year before, they turned the No. 12 pick into veteran George Hill, who helped them return to the playoffs.

    The goodwill is still high for Utah’s front office — Mitchell’s rookie campaign inspired confidence that the Jazz know what they’re doing on draft night. In a draft with many options and variables, the only way to maintain that confidence is to keep making the right choices.

    Devils’ Taylor Hall wins Hart Trophy as the NHL’s MVP


    Las Vegas • New Jersey’s Taylor Hall and the hometown Vegas Golden Knights went home with major honors from the NHL Awards.Hall won the Hart Trophy as the NHL’s most valuable player Wednesday night in the hockey world’s annual postseason awards...

    Las Vegas • New Jersey’s Taylor Hall and the hometown Vegas Golden Knights went home with major honors from the NHL Awards.

    Hall won the Hart Trophy as the NHL’s most valuable player Wednesday night in the hockey world’s annual postseason awards show.

    The high-scoring Devils forward beat out fellow first-time Hart finalists Nathan MacKinnon of Colorado and Anze Kopitar of Los Angeles. Hall got 72 first-place votes and 1,264 total points in the media voting to edge MacKinnon, who got 60 first-place votes and 1,194 points.

    Hall became the first New Jersey player to win the NHL’s biggest individual honor after he finished sixth in the league with 93 points.

    Hall, the No. 1 pick in the 2010 draft, likely got the nod over two worthy contenders because of the way he carried the Devils offensively while they reached the playoffs for the first time in five years. He scored 41 more points than rookie Nico Hischier, the Devils’ second-leading scorer.

    The Golden Knights also took home four awards from the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino after their remarkable inaugural season.

    Coach Gerard Gallant won the Jack Adams Award, and George McPhee was named the NHL’s general manager of the year in recognition of the Golden Knights’ immediate growth into champions of the Pacific Division and the Western Conference.

    High-scoring Knights forward William Karlsson won the Lady Byng Trophy for the player best combining sportsmanship and ability. Defenseman Deryk Engelland also won the Mark Messier NHL Leadership Award for his actions during his team’s breakthrough season in the wake of the shooting massacre on the Las Vegas Strip shortly before their first game.

    Tampa Bay’s Victor Hedman won his first Norris Trophy as the NHL’s top defenseman, while New York Islanders center Mathew Barzal won the Calder Trophy in a landslide as the league’s top rookie.

    Nashville’s Pekka Rinne won his first Vezina Trophy as the league’s top goalie, while Kopitar won his second Selke Trophy as the NHL’s best defensive forward.

    Connor McDavid won the Ted Lindsay Award as the NHL’s most outstanding player in a vote of the players’ union membership, but the Edmonton Oilers star was not a finalist for the Hart, which he won last year.

    New Jersey veteran Brian Boyle won the Masterton Trophy for perseverance and dedication to hockey after putting together an All-Star season in the wake of his cancer diagnosis and healthy problems for his young son.

    The NHL also welcomed the survivors of the Humboldt Broncos bus crash onto the stage late in the show for an emotional tribute. Darcy Haugan, the late coach of the Broncos, was honored with the Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award.

    Gallant was an obvious choice over Colorado’s Jared Bednar and Boston’s Bruce Cassidy after he masterminded the most spectacular expansion season in recent sports history. The Golden Knights went 51-24-7 and handily won the Pacific Division before winning 13 postseason games and reaching the Stanley Cup Final in their first playoff campaign.

    Engelland was honored for his leadership and contributions to society. The veteran defenseman already was a Las Vegas resident when the Golden Knights acquired him, and he emerged as a public face of the team during its inspirational performances in the wake of the shooting.

    “It’s been a remarkable season,” Engelland said. “(We had) a great group of guys. They did a tremendous job putting the group together. For myself, I know there’s a lot of other guys in our locker room that could be here right now in my place. It’s just an honor, and once we look back on the season, it’s pretty special.”

    Kopitar was named the NHL’s top defensive forward for the second time in three years after a standout all-around season.

    Hedman beat out Los Angeles’ Drew Doughty for the Norris after scoring 17 goals and racking up a plus-32 rating in another dominant season for the Lightning.

    Barzal was the runaway winner of the Calder after scoring 85 points in 82 games for the Islanders in his first full NHL season. The 16th overall pick in the 2015 draft scored 20 points more than any other rookie, racking up 22 goals and 63 assists while centering the Islanders’ second line.

    A few trophies awarded in Las Vegas carried no suspense because they were earned based on statistical achievements in the regular season.

    Washington Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin won his seventh Richard Trophy as the NHL’s top goal-scorer, and Los Angeles’ Jonathan Quick won the Jennings Trophy for the second time as the goalie for the team allowing the NHL’s fewest goals.

    McDavid won his second straight Art Ross Trophy as the NHL’s top scorer.

    Already a pro, Doncic set to join college stars in NBA draft


    New York • Luka Doncic is about to become an NBA player, though he’s unlike the other top prospects who will be drafted.He’s already a pro. He’s already a champion.And he might just be the most accomplished and intriguing player in this...

    New York • Luka Doncic is about to become an NBA player, though he’s unlike the other top prospects who will be drafted.

    He’s already a pro. He’s already a champion.

    And he might just be the most accomplished and intriguing player in this class.

    After capping his brilliant stay in Spain with another title, the Slovenian guard heads the list of international players expected to be selected Thursday, a teenager whose resume is already more complete than even some of the most season veterans.

    “He may be the most accomplished European teenager to ever come into the draft,” ESPN draft analyst Jay Bilas said. “You know, there’s very little that is unknown about him. He’s not some workout wonder that people are projecting. He’s accomplished things, and he has been seen in 5-on-5 against high-level competition for a number of years. He’s played professional basketball since he was 13.”

    Doncic couldn’t join Deandre Ayton, Marvin Bagley III and the other headliners in New York on Wednesday because he was en route from Spain after finishing off his dream season by helping Real Madrid win its ACB league championship Tuesday. The 6-foot-7 guard made a 3-pointer off one leg with the shot clock running down and Real Madrid clinging to a three-point lead, and his team held on to win the series in four games and allow him to get to Barclays Center in time for Thursday’s festivities, rather than stay behind for a Game 5.

    He had already been the MVP of both the Euroleague season and its Final Four, the youngest player ever to win both honors, as Real Madrid won that title as well.

    “I’m speechless,” he told the team’s website after Tuesday’s victory. “It has been the season of my life. It’s incredible.”

    The Phoenix Suns have the No. 1 pick and are widely expected to draft Arizona center Deandre Ayton, even though new coach Igor Kokoskov coached Doncic last summer on the Slovenian national team that won the nation’s first EuroBasket gold medal.

    Then it’s Sacramento, Atlanta, Memphis and Dallas, and any of them could consider a player who’s only 19 but has been playing against some of the toughest competition outside the NBA for years. And while there may always be some skepticism of European players because Darko Milicic bombed so badly after being taken right behind LeBron James and ahead of Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade 15 years ago, it would be a surprise if Doncic failed after all he’s already done.

    “He should easily transition to the league really well,” Miami guard Lonnie Walker IV said. “I mean, look at what he’s doing in the Euroleague. You’ve got to respect what he’s doing. You can’t say he’s not good and he’s the MVP and everything of that spot. So pay respect where it’s due. He’s a great player. All you can say is tell him to continue to work hard and prove everyone that’s doubting him wrong.”

    Even with Ayton, a native of the Bahamas, and Doncic at the top of the list of international candidates, the strength of this draft is at the college level. Power programs such as Duke (Bagley and Wendell Carter Jr.), Michigan State (Jaren Jackson Jr. and Miles Bridges), national champion Villanova (Mikal Bridges and Donte DiVincenzo) and Kentucky (Kevin Knox and Shai Gilgeous-Alexander) could have multiple players taken in the top 10-15 selections of the two-round draft, and teams looking for point guards could choose between freshmen Trae Young of Oklahoma and Collin Sexton of Alabama.

    They could give the NBA a second straight strong rookie class, after Utah’s Donovan Mitchell, Boston’s Jayson Tatum and 2016 No. 1 pick Ben Simmons of Philadelphia all helped their teams advance to at least the second round of the postseason.

    “I think it’s a transformational class,” Missouri’s Michael Porter Jr. said. “I think we’ve got a lot of different kinds of players: Deandre, Marvin, the big dudes who are special, and then me along with a couple other wings who can do a lot of different things, and then point guard, Trae, Collin Sexton, and then I heard that Luka dude — I ain’t seen much on him but I heard he’s special, too. So I think we’re a great draft, one of the best in a while.”

    Rising Tide: Collin Sexton to begin pro career in NBA draft


    New York • Collin Sexton isn’t asking for much.All the point guard wants out of Thursday’s NBA draft at Barclays Center is to be picked by a good team. Then, he wants a long and injury-free career. Playoff and championship runs would be an obvious...

    New York • Collin Sexton isn’t asking for much.

    All the point guard wants out of Thursday’s NBA draft at Barclays Center is to be picked by a good team. Then, he wants a long and injury-free career. Playoff and championship runs would be an obvious — and desired — bonus.

    “And to just be happy,” Sexton said Wednesday. “Because that’s the main thing. Be happy with what you’re doing because now it’s a job. It’s something that’s going to feed your family. You have to take it seriously.”

    This is a 19-year-old speaking.

    Opting for the fast lane, Sexton declared for the draft after his freshman season at Alabama, a program that hasn’t had a player drafted in the last decade. He’s only the second Crimson Tide freshman to do so, the first since the one-and-done rule was installed in 2006.

    That year was enough.

    “It was amazing,” Sexton said. “I learned a whole lot — good, bad, everything. I feel like just being there and being around the group of guys I was with, I connected pretty well and had a good season.”

    Sexton helped the Crimson Tide reach the NCAA Tournament for the first time in six years. He then scored 25 points in a victory over Virginia Tech to send Alabama to the second round, a feat it had not accomplished in 12 years.

    The Southeastern Conference named Sexton SEC Co-Freshman of the Year — with Kentucky’s Kevin Knox, who is also in the draft — and The Associated Press awarded him Newcomer of the Year. Sexton finished second in the conference with 19.2 points per game, adding 3.8 rebounds and 3.6 assists per contest. He had 29 double-digit scoring games — 16 were 20 or more points, three were 30-plus points.

    “A guy who plays extremely hard, he’s an overall great competitor,” said Oklahoma’s Trae Young, the draft’s other top point guard prospect. “Whenever you’re a competitor like me, you like playing against people like that.”

    The Young Bull — a nickname Sexton plans to keep in the NBA — grew up fast.

    “Well, you have to,” he said. “Because you have to leave.”

    But he hasn’t had to say goodbye. Not yet.

    Alabama coach Avery Johnson has been keeping up with Sexton and will be at draft. Johnson, a former NBA champion and coach, taught Sexton everything he could as a player and as an adult. He keeps reminding the young star to embrace this opportunity, soak it all in because it only happens once.

    “Also, off the court, he just told me to always respect people,” Sexton said. “You never know what they can do for you, and you never know who’s watching.”

    Good advice, considering all the eyes on him this week.

    Sexton’s eyes are wide, too. The excitement he feels is obvious. A smile sneaks on his face every time he talks about Thursday’s festivities. It’s a relief knowing all his hard work has paid off, and there’s an eagerness to get back out there.

    Since Alabama’s season ended, Sexton has been working on his individual game. He’s already fast but thinks he can be faster. He went back and watched film to figure out where he can improve — and has done so.

    Next time he’s on the court?

    “It’ll be a big surprise,” Sexton said.

    There’s that excitement.

    A year ago, Sexton was fresh out of high school — his days at Pebblebrook High School in Mableton, Georgia, he said ‘feel like forever ago’ — and had just moved into his dorm at Alabama, where he watched the 2017 draft. Pick after pick, he enjoyed players’ reactions. They were so genuine; that has always been his favorite part.

    “I just envisioned myself doing it one day,” Sexton said.

    That day is here. It’s his turn to experience that life-changing moment and, as he said, just be happy.

    It’ll be both a dream come true and a job for the future.

    “You grow up wanting to do this,” Sexton said. “Everybody knows what’s going to come with it.”

    Pope Francis backs U.S. bishops who called border separations immoral


    Vatican City • Pope Francis backed the Catholic bishops in the United States who condemned the practice of separating children from parents after families are caught crossing the U.S-Mexico border illegally, according to an interview published...

    Vatican City • Pope Francis backed the Catholic bishops in the United States who condemned the practice of separating children from parents after families are caught crossing the U.S-Mexico border illegally, according to an interview published Wednesday.

    Francis was asked about the family-separation policy during the interview with Reuters conducted Sunday. The pope replied: “Let it be clear that on these things I respect” the bishops’ stance.

    Galveston-Houston Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, who heads the U.S. bishops’ conference, said last week that “separating babies from their mothers is not the answer and is immoral.”

    Francis said during the Vatican interview that his position on both that issue and U.S. developments in general “lines up with the Episcopate.”

    “I take the side of the Episcopate and stand behind them. Not to wash my hands, but because I don’t know well things from there,” Reuters quoted the pontiff saying.

    He recalled celebrating Mass near the border during his 2016 visit to Mexico.

    Cardinal DiNardo said in a June 13 statement that he was joining Bishop Joe Vasquez, who chairs the conference’s committee on migration, in “condemning the continued use of family separation at the U.S./Mexico border as an implementation of the [Trump] administration’s zero-tolerance policy.”

    However, Francis told Reuters that the problem with American immigration policy “isn’t just Trump’s, but also of the governments before.”

    Elsewhere in the interview, Francis was asked for his solutions within the context of Europe’s mass migration debate.

    Italy’s new populist government this month refused to give a Mediterranean Sea rescue ship carrying 630 migrants permission to dock. The country’s right-wing interior minister also criticized the pope for urging people to show more solidarity with migrants, saying Francis should take more new arrivals at the Vatican.

    “It’s not easy, but populisms aren’t the solution,” the pope said.

    He added: “I believe you mustn’t push back people who arrive, you must receive them, help” them, as well as “see where they will be put, but everywhere in all of Europe. Italy and Greece have been courageous and generous in welcoming these people.”

    Francis also was asked for his opinion on the Trump administration’s decisions to withdraw the United States from an international accord on climate change and to take “steps backward in relations with Cuba.”

    The pope helped broker the re-establishment of diplomatic ties between Cuba and the United States under U.S. President Barack Obama.

    “About Cuba, I was saddened because it was a good step forward,” Francis said, “but I don’t want to judge because to take a decision of that kind, he [Trump] would have had some motive.”

    Francis also has spoken out about the threat of global warming and urged oil company executives to work on finding clean energy sources.

    “Yes, President Trump’s decision on Paris caused me some pain because the future of humanity is at stake,” he said. “But he sometimes makes it understood that he will rethink it, and I hope that he’ll rethink well the Paris accords.”

    For what’s believed to be the first time, the Vatican uses the term ‘LGBT’ in an official document


    The Vatican this month is showing unprecedented, if symbolic, outreach on issues of human sexuality, using what’s believed to be for the first time the term “LGBT” in a planning document for a huge upcoming bishops meeting. Vatican officials also...

    The Vatican this month is showing unprecedented, if symbolic, outreach on issues of human sexuality, using what’s believed to be for the first time the term “LGBT” in a planning document for a huge upcoming bishops meeting.

    Vatican officials also invited to speak at a second global meeting a prominent advocate for LGBT people, something some gay Catholic groups say has never been done.

    The two moves, announced in the past 10 days, are being seen by church watchers as largely an effort to speak in a more respectful way with a younger generation of Catholics who are confronting the church on topics from female priests and abortion to sexuality — but who are clearly not ready to totally walk away from the faith.

    The efforts related to the Synod of Bishops on Young People (in October) and the World Meeting of Families (in August) are part of an explicit push by Pope Francis’ church to say “we have to pay attention to this whole LGBT reality, especially for those who have chosen to remain in the church,” said the Rev. Thomas Rosica, who has often served as an English assistant to the Vatican press office.

    On Tuesday, the Vatican released the details of the upcoming bishops’ synod, or meeting, the third in a series of major global gatherings about the family. The others were in 2014 and 2015. While the document was released only in Italian, the National Catholic Reporter noted that it was the first time the acronym was used. The Catholic Church “has in the past formally referred to gay people as ‘persons with homosexual tendencies,’” the Reporter said.

    Rosica agreed it was a first but said “they’re just using the lingo young people use. There’s nothing earth-shattering.” Vatican spokeswoman Paloma Garcia Ovejero declined to comment on the reason for the adoption of the acronym beyond saying, “I guess there’s no specific answer ... it’s just the result of so many proposals and will be used as a ‘tool’ for discussion.”

    Vatican spokesman Greg Burke did not return request for comment.

    Hundreds of bishops will attend the meeting in Rome to discuss how they can serve young people better. Their meeting will touch on topics from lack of job opportunities for young people in some places and migration to digital addiction and the struggle for reliable news.

    In a section of the synod outline called “the body, affectivity and sexuality,” reports the Catholic Reporter, “It states: ‘Sociological studies demonstrate that many young Catholics do not follow the indications of the Church’s sexual moral teachings . . . No bishops’ conference offers solutions or recipes, but many are of the point of view that questions of sexuality must be discussed more openly and without prejudice,’ “ the Reporter quoted the document saying.

    “There are young Catholics that find in the teachings of the Church a source of joy and desire ‘not only that they continue to be taught despite their unpopularity, but that they be proclaimed with greater depth,’ “ the Catholic Reporter quotes the document as saying. “Those that instead do not share the teachings express the desire to remain part of the Church and ask for a greater clarity about them.”

    Francis DeBernardo, executive director of New Ways ministry, which aims to connect gay Catholics and their church, said the use of the term LGBT is very significant - especially compared with past language, such as people with “homosexual inclinations.”

    “That said, there is nothing in this new document that indicates a change in church teaching. It simply indicates a new openness to discuss these issues more respectfully. How they actually conduct the synod, and, more importantly, what the final synod document will say, is much more important than these developments,” he wrote in an email to The Washington Post.

    The second development involves the World Meeting of Families, a massive, Vatican-run event the Catholic Church holds once every three years. The last time it was held, in 2015, Pope Francis was in Philadelphia. The church faced criticism from LGBT advocates when the only sign of gay families amid a days-long display of family issues was a gay man and his mother talking about celibacy.

    Eight days ago, the Vatican announced details of the next World Meeting, Aug. 21-26, in Dublin. Among many other speakers will be the Rev. Jim Martin, a New York City Jesuit popularly known as Stephen Colbert’s pastor — but within the church as a fierce advocate for positive images and engagement with gay Catholics. Martin will be the first speaker at a World Meeting “on positive pastoral outreach to LGBT people,” The Associated Press reported.

    Martin, author of “Building a Bridge,” about Catholic outreach to the LGBT community, has had several talks canceled in the United States in recent months because of pressure from conservative groups who oppose his call for the church to better accompany gay Catholics, the AP reported.

    Dana Milbank: Republicans, your ‘regular order’ is out of order

    Dana Milbank: Republicans, your ‘regular order’ is out of order


    Washington • Babies are seized from their mothers’ arms. Photographs show their anguish. News reports describe their cages. A recording captures their wailing and a U.S. border official’s cold mockery. A defiant President Trump falsely blames...

    Washington • Babies are seized from their mothers’ arms. Photographs show their anguish. News reports describe their cages. A recording captures their wailing and a U.S. border official’s cold mockery. A defiant President Trump falsely blames others for the misery he created.

    And Republican lawmakers respond as they often have: They hold another hearing about Hillary Clinton’s emails.

    But they have run this play too many times before.

    Just 29 seconds into Tuesday’s hearing on the defeated Democratic 2016 presidential nominee and her emails, Rep. Jerrold Nadler (N.Y.), top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, interrupted to point out that something more important needs attention.

    “We have seen the pictures of immigrants ripped apart from their parents at the border. These children are not animals,” he said. “They are children who have been forcibly removed from their parents in our name.”

    Republicans on the committee tried to silence Nadler with calls of “order!”

    Nadler spoke over them: “The United States should be better than this. We should not put children in cages.”

    “Regular order!” called out Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., chairman of the Judiciary Committee.

    Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., chairman of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, said Nadler “has been given more time than would have been afforded the other side, had we pulled something like that.”

    Ah, so it’s “regular order” to have the umpteenth hearing about a now-private citizen’s emails, but you’re “pulling” a stunt if you talk about the Trump policy under which border guards are reportedly telling parents they are taking children “for a bath” and the children never return.

    No, Republicans, your “regular order” is out of order.

    As soon as Gowdy had silenced Nadler, two women in the back of the room, with infants in their laps, began to heckle the lawmakers about the inhumanity of Trump’s family separation policy.

    Gowdy slammed the gavel to the dais and demanded that the mothers and babies be removed. (At least the Capitol Police had the good sense not to take the babies from the mothers.) “We will be in recess until the Capitol Police restore order!” Gowdy proclaimed.

    But “order” remained elusive.

    Shortly after the moms and babies were evicted from the room, Rep. Elijah Cummings (Md.), top Democrat on the Oversight Committee, spoke. “Are we really going to sit here, 70 members of the Congress of the United States of America, in 2018, and have a hearing … on Hillary Clinton’s emails?”

    His voice rising, and at times breaking, Cummings continued: “We should be able to agree that we will not keep kids in child internment camps indefinitely and hidden away from public view. What country is that? This is the United States of America! We now have reports of parents being deported, but the Trump administration is keeping their children here.”

    But Republicans would not be distracted from their urgent and singular focus on Clinton’s emails. Unhappy that Clinton wasn’t charged in 2016 for mishandling her emails, they had demanded an investigation into the original investigation of Clinton. That investigation, conducted by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz, last week reported misconduct by some officials but “no evidence that the conclusions by the prosecutors were affected by bias or other improper considerations.”

    Now Republicans, still unsatisfied, are threatening to investigate the investigation of the investigation of Clinton. Senate Republicans hauled Horowitz in Monday, and House Republicans hauled him in Tuesday, to field questions for seven hours from 70 lawmakers on the Judiciary and Oversight committees.

    Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., asked: “How is it you can say you found no evidence of bias?”

    Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, suggesting the FBI had acted in a “nefarious” manner and had hidden information from Horowitz , said the misconduct was “more than just casting a cloud on the overall investigation,” as Horowitz had concluded.

    Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., alleged that the FBI had given “false information” to Horowitz, and he attempted to unmask people whose identity the FBI protects because they work in counterterrorism.

    Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, demanded the names of special agents and prosecutors involved in the original probe, and he accused Inspector General Horowitz of going soft in his conclusions and offering “a little throwaway” to Democrats. Alleged Gohmert: “Bias is all the way through this, and I’m sorry that you were not able to see that.”

    Does it never end? “Why is it that, here and now, in June of 2018, we are still talking about Hillary Clinton’s emails at all?” asked Nadler.

    Perhaps because they care more about a scrubbed server than a clean conscience.

    Follow Dana Milbank on Twitter, @Milbank.

    ‘It’s a situation I don’t wish upon any father or human being’: Provo man remembers being separated from his daughter at the border

    ‘It’s a situation I don’t wish upon any father or human being’: Provo man remembers being separated from his daughter at the border


    Provo • Three-year-old Genesis Gonzalez Lopez giggled excitedly as she played with her father at a sunny Utah park, zipping down a slide again and again into his arms.The happy scene this week in Provo, south of Salt Lake City, was a far cry from what...

    Provo • Three-year-old Genesis Gonzalez Lopez giggled excitedly as she played with her father at a sunny Utah park, zipping down a slide again and again into his arms.

    The happy scene this week in Provo, south of Salt Lake City, was a far cry from what the pair experienced on Thanksgiving, when U.S. immigration authorities took Romulo Gonzalez Rodriguez into custody at the U.S.-Mexico border and whisked away the frightened girl, with no explanation of where she’d end up.

    Gonzalez had fled Guatemala with the then-2-year-old after kidnappers held him captive, ripped out his right eye and forced his family to pay a $13,500 ransom for his life. He traveled by bus and train to a San Diego port of entry to seek asylum in the United States and was separated from his daughter for seven days.

    “It’s painful to be running away and come to where you think they’re going to rescue you, and they take the measure of separating children,” the father told The Associated Press in Spanish on Tuesday. “You fall again into fear and the same anguish that you’re leaving behind.”

    Gonzalez’s experience offers a window into the distress and uncertainty parents endure when they are separated from their children at the border, even though it happened before President Donald Trump’s administration in April adopted a “zero tolerance” policy in which all unlawful border crossings were referred for prosecution.

    The policy led to a spike in family separations in recent weeks, provoking a national uproar and pressure from some of Trump’s allies. In a dramatic reversal, the president said Wednesday he was ending the practice, signing an executive order that keeps families together while they’re in custody, expedites their cases and asks the Department of Defense to help house them.

    In Gonzalez’s case, it’s unclear why he and his daughter were separated since he surrendered at the border and is not being prosecuted for illegal entry.

    It has been longstanding practice for Homeland Security to separate adults and minors at the border when it’s unable to confirm they’re related or if it believes a child is at risk. But Gonzalez has no criminal record, his attorney Mari Alvarado Tsosie said.

    Gonzalez has a brother in Provo who sought Alvarado’s advice after Gonzalez was held for ransom in his home country. Gonzalez followed her instructions, arriving at the San Ysidro Port of Entry with his daughter Nov. 23 and handing U.S. immigration authorities a Guatemalan police report about his kidnapping.

    Authorities shepherded his young daughter into another room while Gonzalez answered questions. He thought they would be reunited when he was done, but he was instead taken to a detention center without his daughter, Alvarado said. When he asked where she was, they wouldn’t tell him, he said.

    Gonzalez said he then spent seven days at a cold facility where the lights never turned off, wondering if his daughter was safe and if he would ever see her again. In Guatemala, his kidnappers had threated to dismember the child, and he suspected corrupt authorities were involved. His mind raced with worries U.S. law enforcement was corrupt too.

    “It’s tremendous anguish because you don’t get any answers from authorities,” Gonzalez said at his attorney’s office in Provo, his daughter sitting on his lap. “They don’t give you information, and you don’t know the laws. … You’re wondering: Where is she? What is she doing? Such a small child.”

    Parents who surrender at U.S. ports of entry have occasionally been separated from their children with no formal explanation since long before the Trump administration’s zero tolerance policy, said Dan Kowalski, editor of Bender’s Immigration Bulletin, a national journal focused on immigration cases and law. He believes it’s because of a lack of training, leadership and standard operating procedures that allows border agents to make up rules as they go.

    If they suspected Gonzalez was abusing the child or trafficking her, they would have sent the case to prosecutors, Kowalski said.

    A spokesman with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement had no immediate comment on the case.

    After learning of Gonzalez’s situation, Alvarado began calling every ICE facility in Southern California looking for him and the child. It took her three days to find Gonzalez at San Diego’s Otay Mesa Detention Center and another four days to reunite him with his daughter.

    To this day, Alvarado doesn’t know where Genesis was held, though she believes the girl was somewhere in San Diego. All the girl has said is that she ate a lot of cereal.

    The father and daughter are staying with Gonzalez’s brother while they await word on the asylum request. A hearing is set for Oct. 22 at a Salt Lake City immigration court.

    Gonzalez’s wife and two stepchildren are in hiding in Guatemala and waiting until he can send enough money for them to make the journey north.

    Genesis is too young to say what happened to her while they were apart or express how it affected her. But her father said she was sickly when they reunited and seems nervous and clingier now. She starts therapy later this month.

    On Tuesday, Genesis looked like a typical, sweet toddler, hugging her father tightly and giving him kisses while he spoke.

    Gonzalez is happy to be safe for now but said he’s living in limbo not knowing if he’ll be forced to return to the Guatemalan beach town that he once loved, where he now fears he’ll be killed if he returns. He wears a glass eye since his attack.

    Between that ordeal and the separation from Genesis, Gonzalez said he suffered significant trauma of his own that he has yet to deal with.

    “It’s a situation I don’t wish upon any father or human being,” he said. “It affects you a lot psychologically, emotionally. There are moments when I remember it all, and I start to cry for no reason.”

    Patty Willis: Parents and children calling in the night. Again.

    Patty Willis: Parents and children calling in the night. Again.


    On Dec. 7, 1941, Yoshiko Uchida, an educator and writer in her last year at University of California Berkeley, listened to the unbelievable news of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. On that day, her family’s life changed forever.When she returned home that...

    On Dec. 7, 1941, Yoshiko Uchida, an educator and writer in her last year at University of California Berkeley, listened to the unbelievable news of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. On that day, her family’s life changed forever.

    When she returned home that night, her father, a pillar in the Japanese-American community, had disappeared, taken away by U.S. government officials. In her memoir, “Desert Exile,” she recounts her mother’s hope that night: “Let’s leave the porch light on and the screen door unlatched. ... Maybe Papa will be back later tonight.”

    He did not return. For several days, she and her family lived with uncertainty, not knowing where Papa had gone. Throughout the Japanese-American and Japanese immigrant community, children were calling out in the night for their fathers who had been taken away.

    Last Saturday, a convoy from our church visited the Topaz Museum in Delta, Utah, that stands as a witness to the history of separated families. First, fathers were ripped from their families and then Executive Order 9066 separated out and incarcerated families of Japanese descent, in desolate outposts such as Topaz in central Utah and Heart Mountain in northern Wyoming.

    The museum in Delta holds the history, showing that this one act was part of the larger evil of racism that had been informing our immigration laws, limiting the immigration of Asians, represented by the Immigration Act of 1924 that created a national origins quota which limited the number of immigrants by country and excluded all immigrants from Asia. The museum uncovers the racism that formed the foundation of human rights’ violations during World War II. We must remember, their voices call to us. We must remember because we must not do this again.

    We are doing this again.

    Evidence is flooding social media, radio, newspapers, and television. Children under reflective silver blankets are calling out for Mami and Papi. A Honduran man, separated from his wife and three-year-old child at the border, took his own life in a jail cell.

    Oh America, when will we learn our lessons of history? When will we weep with the Ute, Shoshone and Paiute children crying in the dorm rooms of Indian schools, separated from their parents, corporally punished for speaking their native languages?

    When will Sojourner Truth’s face emerge in the faces of parents crying for their children on the border in her words, said in 1851: “I have borne 13 children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother’s grief, none but Jesus heard me!”

    Are you listening, America, to what has been allowed under our watch for hundreds of years? Do you wonder, what if those of us who lived in privilege had stood with Sojourner Truth and formed a human shield around the auction block that wrested babes out of her arms?

    When will we stand together for the protection of children calling for their parents and parents calling for their children? When will we be a country that stops a human rights disaster as we are entering it?

    If you are waking up to this ancient tragedy being enacted again, write to your representatives in Washington, in Salt Lake City, in the Governor’s Mansion. Tell them to use their power to bring families back together.

    Come to the Capitol on June 30 at 10 a.m. and join the “Families Belong Together” gathering. Let us weep together and raise our voices in anger and solidarity, saying “We hear the cries of parents and children separated on our borders. It is time to stop!”

    Rev. Patty C. Willis is pastor of the South Valley Unitarian Universalist Society.

    Bagley Cartoon: Deficit Deceit

    Bagley Cartoon: Deficit Deceit


    This Pat Bagley cartoon appears in The Salt Lake Tribune on Thursday, June 21, 2018.You can check out the past 10 Bagley editorial cartoons below:Caught!A Mother’s GriefFreedom Festival FolliesOur Foxy Friends Check Back Later Seat of Power Undoing...

    This Pat Bagley cartoon appears in The Salt Lake Tribune on Thursday, June 21, 2018.
    You can check out the past 10 Bagley editorial cartoons below:
    Caught!
    A Mother’s Grief
    Freedom Festival Follies
    Our Foxy Friends
    Check Back Later
    Seat of Power
    Undoing Obama’s Legacy
    EPA’s Scott Pruitt and Free Stuff
    The Utah Swamp
    Hard to See
    Want more Bagley? Become a fan on Facebook.


    Burger King aplogizes after ad promises lifetime supply of Whoppers to Russian women who get pregnant by World Cup players


    Moscow • Burger King has apologized for offering a lifetime supply of Whoppers to Russian women who get pregnant by World Cup players.Critics assailed the offer, announced on Russian social media, as sexist and demeaning.The announcement was removed...

    Moscow • Burger King has apologized for offering a lifetime supply of Whoppers to Russian women who get pregnant by World Cup players.

    Critics assailed the offer, announced on Russian social media, as sexist and demeaning.

    The announcement was removed Tuesday from Burger King’s social media accounts but was still circulating among Russian social network users. It promised a reward of free burgers to women who get “the best football genes” and “ensure the success of the Russian team for generations to come.”

    In a statement Wednesday to The Associated Press, Burger King said, “We are sorry about the clearly offensive promotion that the team in Russia launched online.” It said the offer “does not reflect our brand or our values and we are taking steps to ensure this type of activity does not happen again.”

    Ads in Russia often play on sexist stereotypes, notably ads around sporting events like the World Cup. Women’s rights activists have been increasingly speaking out against them.

    George Pyle: Refugees do not work for you. The government does.

    George Pyle: Refugees do not work for you. The government does.


    Here is an idea that needs to be taken out and shot, before it does any more damage.Whether it is invading Iraq, torturing suspected terrorists, imposing long prison sentences for low-level drug crimes, looking the other way when police officers shoot...

    Here is an idea that needs to be taken out and shot, before it does any more damage.

    Whether it is invading Iraq, torturing suspected terrorists, imposing long prison sentences for low-level drug crimes, looking the other way when police officers shoot unarmed black men or building jails for babies in Texas, there is always someone to argue that the government action was necessary, automatic, because of something someone else did.

    If the victims of our overreaction, our bad judgment, our need to punish, didn’t want to be attacked, tortured, jailed, shot or subjected to institutionalized child abuse, then those people — or their parents — shouldn’t have done what they did.

    Well, no, in many cases they shouldn’t. A basic don’t-do-the-crime-if-you-can’t-do-the-time argument has much validity to it.

    But when the citizens of a democracy consider whether their executives, their armed forces, their police, their courts, even their media, have acted with justice and decency, one factor always must be at the front of our minds.

    Our job as citizens, as voters, as the media, as decent human beings, is to judge the people who work for us, not the people who don’t.

    Partly because the people who work for us generally have the most power — socially, financially and legally — they must be held to a higher standard of behavior than those who have little or no power.

    That doesn’t mean we should forgive the murderer or the rapist. Those acts are an abuse of power, unofficial power, thug power, but power nevertheless. And abuses of power are the ultimate crime.

    And so when our government launches an pointless invasion, builds a secret prison, resorts to mass incarceration or behaves as if black lives don’t matter, it is abusing its power and failing to do its duty.

    The frequent targets of government power may have had, and may have failed to live up to, their individual responsibility to society. That’s bad. But it’s, usually, small. And it’s, often, too much to expect powerless individuals to have done anything else.

    Certainly that is the case for the desperate families fleeing violence and lawlessness in Central America, who come to the United States because, well, for more than 200 years, it’s been where people in desperate circumstances go.

    They may be mistaken, taking advantage or not so helpless as they would like us to believe. But whatever they are, they don’t work for you.

    Your members of Congress, the Department of Homeland Security, the Border Patrol, the White House, they do work for you. At least in theory. They have a duty, a responsibility, to uphold our highest ideals.

    It is your duty to hold them to it.

    [email protected]

    Diego Costa scores again, Spain beats Iran 1-0 at World Cup


    Kazan, Russia • Diego Costa scored on a deflection to lead Spain to a 1-0 win over Iran on Wednesday at the World Cup.Costa broke the deadlock in the 54th minute after being set up by Andres Iniesta. The powerful striker turned in the area and took a...

    Kazan, Russia • Diego Costa scored on a deflection to lead Spain to a 1-0 win over Iran on Wednesday at the World Cup.

    Costa broke the deadlock in the 54th minute after being set up by Andres Iniesta. The powerful striker turned in the area and took a shot but the ball deflected off Ramin Rezeian before bouncing back onto Costa’s knee and into the net.

    Costa, who also scored two goals in the opening match, has three goals at this year’s World Cup, trailing Cristiano Ronaldo by one. He also has nine goals in his last nine starts for Spain.

    Both Spain and Portugal have four points in Group B following their 3-3 draw and subsequent 1-0 victories. Iran has three points in the group but Morocco has been eliminated.

    Facing a very compact Iranian team that came out to defend, Spain pressed very high and had to be patient. The 2010 World Cup champions were almost caught against the run of the play when Karim Ansarifard unleashed a powerful strike that ended up in the side-netting following a long thrown in.

    Trailing in the second half, Iran nearly equalized when Saeid Ezatolahi had a goal was ruled out on video review.

    Iran continued to push hard and managed to challenge with some fast counterattacks.

    Spain was lucky not to concede toward the end as Mehdi Taremi connected with a cross from Ansarifard but his header from close range went over the crossbar.

    First place in the group could be decided by goal difference.

    Spain will face Morocco in its final match on Monday in Kaliningrad, while Portugal plays Iran in Saransk on the same day.

    But with three points, Iran has still a chance to qualify for the knockout stage. The Iranians will need to beat Portugal to advance.

    Ronaldo scores in Portugal’s 1-0 win over Morocco

    Moscow • Cristiano Ronaldo made European soccer history by scoring in Portugal’s 1-0 win over Morocco on Wednesday, a result that makes the North African team the first to be eliminated from the World Cup.

    Ronaldo’s header in the fourth minute was his fourth goal at this year’s tournament, and his 85th for his country. That put him ahead of Hungary great Ferenc Puskas and alone in second place worldwide behind Ali Daei’s 109 goals for Iran.

    The Portugal forward celebrated his goal with a trademark run and soaring leap toward the corner flag at Luzhniki Stadium.

    Morocco lost 1-0 for the second straight Group B match and is out of contention for a spot in the next round.

    The North Africans had several chances against Portugal, nearly all from set pieces, and three of them came in a five-minute spell early in the second half. Younes Belhanda was twice denied by goalkeeper Rui Patricio’s diving saves, and defender Mehdi Benatia scooped a shot over the bar.

    In injury time, Benatia lifted another shot too high with an even clearer chance.

    Suarez’s goal wins it for Uruguay, eliminates Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    Rostov-on-Don, Russia • Luis Suarez put both Uruguay and host Russia into the second round of the World Cup while eliminating Saudi Arabia and Egypt at the same time.

    Suarez scored the winning goal in his 100th international appearance for Uruguay, knocking in a corner kick from Carlos Sanchez in the 23rd minute to give the two-time champions a 1-0 victory over the Saudis on Wednesday.

    It was the Barcelona striker’s 52nd goal for his country in that century of games.

    Besides scoring, Suarez led his team with a hard-working performance. He fell back to defend and raced forward on the counterattack.

    Uruguay and Russia both have six points from their opening two matches, putting them into the round of 16. They will face each other on Monday in Samara with first place in Group A on the line.

    Jennifer Rubin: Babies in warehouses: This is what the GOP has come to

    Jennifer Rubin: Babies in warehouses: This is what the GOP has come to


    The blood of decent Americans was already boiling because of the pictures and audio of children being separated from their parents at the border. Then came the Associated Press article Tuesday evening:“Trump administration officials have been sending...

    The blood of decent Americans was already boiling because of the pictures and audio of children being separated from their parents at the border. Then came the Associated Press article Tuesday evening:

    “Trump administration officials have been sending babies and other young children forcibly separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border to at least three ‘tender age’ shelters in South Texas, The Associated Press has learned.

    “Lawyers and medical providers who have visited the Rio Grande Valley shelters described play rooms of crying preschool-age children in crisis. The government also plans to open a fourth shelter to house hundreds of young migrant children in Houston, where city leaders denounced the move Tuesday.”

    This is moral madness, a betrayal of universal human values that marks the lowest point in the Trump presidency — or any presidency since the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

    There is no point, ever, at which Fox News executives stop raking in money and sending their hosts out to pander to ignorant anti-immigrant audiences. (A patch of Fox TV and film talent is up in arms, some threatening to leave for another studio.) There is never a time when House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., says, “You know, my church and my conscience don’t allow me to participate in such evil,” or when anyone in the White House has the decency to quit rather than lie and help perpetuate the policy.

    There surely is never a moment the president stops lying, because he refuses to take responsibility for the harm he is inflicting on children. The Post’s Ashley Parker reports:

    “Since Saturday, Trump has tweeted false or misleading information at least seven times on the topic of immigration and at least six times on a Justice Department inspector general report into the FBI’s handling of its investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server. That’s more than a dozen obfuscations on just two central topics — a figure that does not include falsehoods on other issues, whether in tweets or public remarks.

    “The false claims come as the president — emboldened by fewer disciplinarians inside the West Wing — indulges in frequent Twitter screeds. A Washington Post analysis found that in June, Trump has been tweeting at the fastest rate of his presidency so far, an average of 11.3 messages per day.”

    He is, unbelievably, getting worse, and there is no one in the administration willing to resist. Trump told the House Republicans that they should fix the problem he created, although he continues to back a House immigration plan that hasn’t a prayer of passing. (If the GOP-controlled Congress is in the palm of his hand, why didn’t he demand that a bill get passed days ago?)

    There are plenty of signs that the public has finally had enough of Trump’s lying and the GOP’s inhumanity. A massive protest is planned for June 30 near the White House and in 132 cities across the country. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce issued a blistering attack on Trump’s policies. (“Thousands of children are being forcibly removed from their parents by our government. There is no other way to say it, this is not who we are and it must end now. Policymakers in Washington are accustomed to hearing the U.S. Chamber of Commerce opine about the economics of particular policies. But public policy is often also a reflection of a nation’s values.”) The chamber also took on revocation of temporary protected status for thousands who fled natural and political disasters and demanded a solution for the “dreamers.”

    More evangelical leaders who had blindly followed Trump before are now speaking out to demand an end to the policy. At least eight governors (including two Republicans) are now recalling National Guard troops assigned to help with the border crackdown.

    There is far more that can be done — from voters calling and showing up at lawmakers’ offices and appearances, to cutting off donations flowing to GOP candidates and PACs. From the pulpit, religious leaders can and should challenge their congregants to uphold their religious traditions; outside groups and individuals can decline White House invitations and meetings until Trump orders the policy stopped.

    However this is resolved, the Republican Party has disgraced itself and lost the moral authority to govern. Anyone and everyone with an “R” after his or her name who did not condemn the policy and take meaningful action to eliminate it will be attacked for this disgraceful chapter. Really, should they be re-elected for anything — ever?

    Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Washington Post, offering reported opinion from a center-right perspective.