The Salt Lake Tribune


    $3 billion Salt Lake airport rebuild hits midway mark of Phase 1 and future begins to take shape

    $3 billion Salt Lake airport rebuild hits midway mark of Phase 1 and future begins to take shape


    The first phase of rebuilding the Salt Lake City International Airport is at a midpoint: construction began three years ago, and opening is scheduled in another three.So airport officials took the news media on a tour Friday of construction of what...

    The first phase of rebuilding the Salt Lake City International Airport is at a midpoint: construction began three years ago, and opening is scheduled in another three.

    So airport officials took the news media on a tour Friday of construction of what eventually will be a $3 billion project, scheduled to have all phases fully completed in 2025.

    “It’s getting exciting now,” said Mike Williams, airport redevelopment program director, as he looked over vast fields of new foundations, support columns, a small army of 600 workers, 19 cranes lifting steel and supplies, and several buildings rising from the ground.

    He says the scene will become even busier soon — with an expected 2,000 construction workers at its peak.

    He stood atop the new south concourse building, which will house 25 new airport gates in its first phase and more later. It is far enough along that crews are starting to enclose it, and are working on baggage handling systems in its lower level.

    Williams smiles envisioning how the building will eventually look. It will be more spacious than current gate areas, so “it will be easier to find a place to sit, relax and wait for your plane.” It will have “more retail space, and more food and beverage offerings.”

    He adds, “It will give everyone a beautiful perspective and remind you that you are in Utah. … There will be a lot of windows, and you will be able to see all the beautiful mountains in the surrounding area. The colors of the new facility will all remind you of the colors of Utah.”

    Steel will start rising next month on the new terminal — home of ticket counters, security checkpoints and the baggage claim. “The building will start coming out of the ground pretty rapidly now,” Williams said.

    Support columns for a new parking garage also are rising. “It will be twice the size of the one we have today,” he adds.

    It will connect to a “gateway” building where people can drop luggage and obtain tickets also, and cross walkways into the new terminal.

    New 7-foot diameter columns are also in place for a new two-level roadway system.

    “That helps with the congestion in front of the terminal building,” Williams said. “You will have one level where you will drop off at ticketing, and then a lower level where you will pick up passengers.”

    The first 4 million square foot phase will include half of two parallel new concourses, and tunnels between them; the new terminal; the gateway building; the parking garage; new roadways; and several ancillary buildings.

    Once that first phase is completed, “We’ll move everybody into this, and we’ll begin knocking down the other facilities in a phased manner. All other existing buildings at the airport will be demolished,” Williams said. As they are cleared, later phases will expand the new concourses.

    Williams notes their parallel design will help speed aircraft operations. The current finger-like configuration of concourses sometimes leads to operations that box in airplanes, leading to flight delays.

    Much of the work so far has included such things as building a new parking lot, a new rental car facility — and extensive preparation of the work area.

    Construction director Leon Nelson said the high water table in the area near Great Salt Lake wetlands makes construction a bit tricky. The water level is just seven feet below the surface, but many of the tunnels and lower levels of buildings are 30 feet deep. That required installation of wells to drain the water during construction.

    It also required pillars not only to support the weight of buildings in wet areas, but also pillars to anchor them when the wells are turned off later. “If we didn’t do the anchor piles, then the whole thing would float — so we would be on our oars rowing over to the Great Salt Lake,” Nelson joked.

    Williams also said the baggage system for the airport will be 8 miles long, and actually was the first thing designed.

    “The baggage system is such an integral system of the workings of the entire airport that you have to really lay it out first, figure out how it has to work and then protect that right of way and build the buildings around it,” he said.


    Feds arrest ‘Double Hat Bandit,’ who allegedly robbed Utah banks

    Feds arrest ‘Double Hat Bandit,’ who allegedly robbed Utah banks


    The FBI arrested a 54-year-old man who was wanted on suspicion of more than a dozen bank robberies, the bureau announced Friday. Agents and local police arrested Shayne Carson — suspected of being the “Double Hat Bandit,” a reference to wearing a...

    The FBI arrested a 54-year-old man who was wanted on suspicion of more than a dozen bank robberies, the bureau announced Friday.

    Agents and local police arrested Shayne Carson — suspected of being the “Double Hat Bandit,” a reference to wearing a baseball cap and beanie at the same time — Thursday in a motel parking lot in Whiteland, Ind., according to a news release from the FBI.

    An FBI analyst working in Albuquerque figured out Carson’s identity after reading about the robberies in August. The analyst figured out that the vehicle used in the robberies was most likely a grey 2004 Chevrolet Malibu registered in New Mexico, and compared driver’s license photos of each of the registered owners to released photos of the robber.

    Officials suspected Carson was responsible for a string of 14 armed robberies in five states, between December and July of this year. The analyst found that Carson had been in the specific states at the time of the robberies by comparing the timeline to photos posted to Carson’s Facebook page.

    Carson allegedly lifted his shirt to show a weapon tucked into his waistband at each of the Utah banks, according to the FBI.

    The FBI anticipates Carson will be sent to Utah to face charges filed in Salt Lake City. He’s accused of robbing bank branches in four Utah grocery stores:

    Dec. 19, 2016, U.S. Bank, 4065 S. Redwood Road, West Valley CityDec. 27, 2016, U.S. Bank, 7061 S. Redwood Road, West JordanDec. 27, 2016, U.S. Bank, 4080 W. 9000 South, West JordanJune 21, 2017, U.S. Bank, 922 E. 2100 South, Salt Lake City 

    Carson is also suspected of robbing banks in Washington, Oregon, Colorado and Idaho.

    Holy Brigham Young (University)! Caffeinated sodas allowed on Mormon church school’s campus


    Don’t cue the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, and no, Brigham Young University is not on a slippery slope to tapping kegs of light beer in its cafeteria.But, yes, the LDS Church-owned school has decided to end its more than half-century...

    Don’t cue the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, and no, Brigham Young University is not on a slippery slope to tapping kegs of light beer in its cafeteria.

    But, yes, the LDS Church-owned school has decided to end its more than half-century ”caffeine-free” policy on the Provo campus, at least when it comes to soda.

    Linked sometimes to a long-running interpretation — or misinterpretation — of Mormonism’s “Word of Wisdom,” BYU had banned caffeinated beverages (coffee, tea and other than caffeine-free soft drinks) since the mid-1950s.

    That health code, which appears in the faith’s scriptures (Doctrine and Covenants Section 89), prohibits “hot drinks” — defined by top LDS leaders as tea and coffee — as well as alcohol and tobacco, but does not specifically bar caffeine, church leaders reaffirmed in 2012.

    It, however, took BYU, the flagship school of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, at least five years to acquiesce. On Thursday, Dining Services Director Dean Wright indicated increased requests for caffeinated soft drinks had prompted the policy change.

    It’s happening. https://t.co/ZjomHCrYCo pic.twitter.com/KOyikaZ0l4

    — BYU (@BYU) September 21, 2017

    “We have already started adding caffeinated soft drinks to the inventory of beverages we sell on campus,” he stated. “Although we are now offering canned and bottled caffeinated soft drinks, it will take longer to change out our fountain equipment.”

    BYU, however, will not offer supercaffeinated “energy drinks,” and it will still offer caffeine-free versions of soda products on campus, Wright added.

    Those soda products will, under a longstanding contract, continue to be provided by the Coca-Cola Co.

    As for coffee or tea, hot or cold, forget it. This is just about the sodas, says BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins.

    United Utah hopeful Jim Bennett qualifies for 3rd District debate in race to fill seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz


    After concerns that the first poll deviated from the “prescribed approach,” the Utah Debate Commission ran a second survey — and with this one the new United Utah Party’s Jim Bennett has narrowly qualified to spar against the Republican and...

    After concerns that the first poll deviated from the “prescribed approach,” the Utah Debate Commission ran a second survey — and with this one the new United Utah Party’s Jim Bennett has narrowly qualified to spar against the Republican and Democratic candidates looking to replace former Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz.

    This is the first time a third-party candidate will participate in the selective debate since the commission began hosting them in 2014.

    “We’re making history here,” Bennett said. “It’s really exciting. I couldn’t be happier.”

    In the latest poll released Friday, Bennett fetched 6 percent. That’s still well below Provo Mayor John Curtis, the Republican and automatic front-runner in this red district, who collected 54 percent and pulled further ahead of Democrat Kathie Allen, a first-time candidate and fundraising powerhouse, who landed just under 17 percent.

    Still, it was enough for Bennett, son of the late three-term U.S. Sen. Bob Bennett, to earn a podium for the Oct. 18 debate (to be held 6 p.m. at Provo’s Brigham Young University). Barely.

    The commission’s co-chairman Thomas Wright said it came down to one person selecting Bennett in the poll to put him over the qualifying threshold.

    “We’ve always said that every vote counts and, in this case, one voter put a candidate into the debate,” he added.

    The new survey, conducted by Dan Jones & Associates from Sept. 14 to 20, follows one the commission released last week in conjunction with a statewide poll Utah Policy was already preparing. With those results, Bennett had missed the debate by a thin margin of 0.43 percentage points.

    The commission has attributed the do-over to a problem with the order of the questions. In the past, it has done its own polling devoted solely to the elections involved in its debates.

    “We were doing it as a service to them — with the understanding that was their question,” said LaVarr Webb, Utah Policy publisher, when the results and “oversampling” became disputed.

    In a statement Friday, the commission said it ran a new survey among 600 registered voters in the 3rd Congressional District “to maintain the integrity of the process” and be “consistent with polls conducted in previous election cycles.” It has a 4 percentage point margin of error.

    Bennett believes the results validate his campaign, which has faced a rocky path to the Nov. 7 ballot that included a late start and a court battle.

    “I have an awful lot of ground to cover,” he said. “The reality is that people are voting according to old habits. They don’t know who I am and they don’t know anything about me.”

    (It doesn’t help that his last name has been misspelled on both of the polls.)

    Bennett has certainly been campaigning for more visibility and sees the debate as an “opportunity to blow the whole race wide open.”

    “They said I wasn’t going to be able to get on the ballot. I’m on the ballot. They said I wouldn’t get in the debate. I’m in the debate. So I think that should give pause to anybody who doesn’t think I have a chance.”

    The five other independent, write-in and third-party candidates in the race collectively got 5 percent in the poll and will not be included in the debate. Libertarian Joe Buchman congratulated Bennett for “cracking the glass ceiling” and leading the way for other voices to be included in political discussions.

    Allen’s and Curtis’ campaigns, too, welcomed the United Utah Party’s addition to the stage.

    “He’s trying to break down the partisan labels that are polarizing our political discourse, and we’re trying to do the same,” said Daniel Friend, Allen’s spokesman.

    Friend also attributed Allen’s slight dip in the new poll — down to 16.67 percent from nearly 20 percent — to the margin of error. Unlike Curtis, she didn’t face a primary election to reach the ballot for the general election.

    “The pollsters just happened to talk to a few more Republicans this time,” he said.

    Danny Laub, spokesman for Curtis, said the results continue to show that the mayor’s “hard work and message of getting things done for Utah are resonating across the district.”

    Roughly 16 percent of respondents reported being undecided. The open seat, which the conservative Chaffetz won handily by at least a 37 percentage point margin each election for five terms, came up for grabs when the congressman stepped down early on June 30.

    At least one other debate in the race is planned for Oct. 13 and is set to take place at Sandy’s Eastmont Middle School at 6:30 p.m.

    It's all here: Your Utah vs. Arizona game guide

    It's all here: Your Utah vs. Arizona game guide


    Time, Place and Airwaves • The Utes second road game of the season and Pac-12 Conference opener at Arizona Stadium gets going at 8:30 p.m. Friday. You can watch on FS1 or listen on ESPN 700 AM, Sirius 84/XM 84.Line • Utah was a 3.5-point favorite as...

    Time, Place and Airwaves • The Utes second road game of the season and Pac-12 Conference opener at Arizona Stadium gets going at 8:30 p.m. Friday. You can watch on FS1 or listen on ESPN 700 AM, Sirius 84/XM 84.

    Line • Utah was a 3.5-point favorite as of Thursday.

    Opposing coach • Rich Rodriguez is in his sixth season as Arizona’s coach. He has gone 38-30 since taking over in November 2011. He won the 2014 Pac-12 Conference Coach of the Year award. His overall record as a head coach is 158-114-2 with previous stints at Michigan, West Virginia, Glenville State and Salem University. He has gone 4-2 against Utah in his coaching career.

    Utah ties • Arizona offensive lineman Maisen Knight is from Salt Lake City and played high school football at Judge Memorial High School where he was a team captain as a senior, a first-team 3A all-state selection and also lettered in lacrosse. The 6-foot-5, 279-pound sophomore played at Ventura College in 2016.

    Pregame quotable • Utes coach Kyle Whittingham said this week’s game “will be the biggest match-up and the most critical to the outcome of the game, their run game against our run defense.”

    Media guide nugget • Redshirt senior offensive lineman Gerhard de Beer, who is 6-foot-7 and 320 pounds, is attending Arizona on a track and field scholarship. He won the Pac-12 discus championship in 2015 and has also placed among the top four in 2014 and 2016 and placed fourth in the NCAA Championships in 2016. He has started all three games at right tackle this season.

    Telling stat • In five games between the teams since Rich Rodriguez has taken over as Arizona’s coach, the Utes have allowed an average of 240.6 yards per game against Arizona.

    Wildcats offensive outlook • Quarterback Brandon Dawkins finished fourth in the Pac-12 in rushing yards per game last season (94.4), and he ranked eighth in passing yards per game (134.8) while posting a 124 pass efficiency rating. Senior running back Nick Wilson had his year limited to five games in 2016 due to injuries. He started the season off with consecutive 100-yard performances against BYU and Grambling State. True freshman tight end Bryce Wolma didn’t have a catch in his first game, but had five catches against Houston and six against UTEP, including a touchdown. He has a team-high 11 receptions through three games to go with 79 receiving yards. He has stepped in for Trevor Wood who missed the past two weeks with an injury. The offensive line features six players with four starts or more each including 36 starts by redshirt right guard Jacob Alsadek and 28 starts by left tackle Layth Friekh. As a group thos six linemen have 105 career starts returning this season.

    Wildcats defensive outlook • Arizona has played a lot of inexperienced players on defense so far this season. They have just three seniors listed as starters on their depth chart in defensive tackle Parker Zellers, linebacker Brandon Rutt, and defensive back Dane Cruikshank. Freshmen have accounted for nearly half (46 percent) of Arizona’s tackles. However, Arizona has forced multiple turnovers in four straight games. Linebacker Tony Fields II leads the team with 17 tackles while junior safety Demetrius Flannigan Fowles has three interceptions. He led the team with 59 unassisted tackles last season and finished with the second-most tackles on the defense (78). Fields is a 6-foot-1, 225-pound freshman from Las Vegas was a three-sport athlete in high school (football, basketball, baseball) and helped lead his team to a state championship as a senior.

    Wildcats special teams outlook • Punt returner Shun Brown has two returns for touchdowns in three games. Brown has averaged 27 yards per return on five returns this season. Kick returner Tyrell Johnson has averaged 28.6 yards per return with a long of 58 yards. Punter Jake Glatting (38.2 yards per punt) has punted 10 times this season with just one of 50 yards or more and three downed inside the 20-yard line.

    Injury report • The Utes could be without starting strong safety Chase Hansen for the second straight game. Hansen did not play last week against San Jose State due to an undisclosed injury. The Utes have a bye week next week, so it may make sense for Hansen to sit out this week and get three consecutive weeks of rest and recovery. Arizona linebacker DeAndre Miller’s status was also uncertain as he has not played yet this season after undergoing foot surgery in the offseason. Senior wide receiver Cam Denson has been a partial participant in practice and has been seen in a walking boot according to the Arizona Daily Star.

    THREE BIG QUESTIONS

    1. Will the Utes defense contain the Arizona running game?

    The Wildcats haven’t played a defense as stout as the Utes, who come in with the second-ranked run defense in the nation. However, the Wildcats have rushed for an average of 328 yards per game, the sixth-highest total in FBS coming into this week. The Utes’ defense has held opponents to an average of 49.3 yards per game (1.66 yards per rush), the second-stingiest defense in FBS. The Utes have allowed just one rushing touchdown in three games.

    2. Can the Arizona defense shut down Darren Carrington II, and how will the Utes adjust if it does?

    Carrington has been a dominant figure in his first three games in a Utes uniform with 409 receiving yards and four touchdowns in three games. He goes into this weekend ranked fifth in the nation in receptions per game (8.7). He is the first Utah player with three straight 100-yard receiving games since Dres Anderson in 2013. Carrington’s 26 receptions are a little shy of double that of the team’s second-leading receiver Samson Nacua (14 receptions, 130 yards). If Arizona is able to limit Carrington’s impact, then Nacua, Raelon Singleton (six catches, 42 yards), Siosi Wilson (eight catches, 127 yards) and Demari Simpkins (six catches, 40 yards) will have to pick up the slack.

    3. Which quarterback will impose his will on this game?

    Both teams feature dynamic dual-threat quarterbacks capable of making game-changing plays in multiple ways. Utah sophomore quarterback Tyler Huntley ranks 14th in FBS in completion percentage (72.1), and he has accounted for 76 percent of Utah’s offensive yards through three games. He has averaged 289.3 yards passing and 70.7 yards rushing in his first three games as the starter. Like Arizona’s Brandon Dawkins, Huntley is his team’s leading rusher. Dawkins needs 46 yards to surpass Ronald Veal for the most rushing yards by a quarterback in program history. This season, Dawkins has averaged 83.7 rushing yards per game and five touchdowns. He has also completed 66.7 percent of his passes and thrown for 422 yards (140.7 yards per game) and four touchdowns without an interception.


    GOP health bill all but dead; McCain again deals the blow


    Washington • Sen. John McCain declared his opposition Friday to the GOP’s last-ditch effort to repeal and replace “Obamacare,” dealing a likely death blow to the legislation and, perhaps, to the Republican Party’s years of vows to kill the...

    Washington • Sen. John McCain declared his opposition Friday to the GOP’s last-ditch effort to repeal and replace “Obamacare,” dealing a likely death blow to the legislation and, perhaps, to the Republican Party’s years of vows to kill the program.

    “I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal,” McCain said in a statement, referring to the bill by Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana. His opposition likely leaves the bill at least one vote short of the support needed for passage.

    “I believe we could do better working together, Republicans and Democrats, and have not yet really tried,” McCain said. “Nor could I support it without knowing how much it will cost, how it will affect insurance premiums, and how many people will be helped or hurt by it.”

    McCain was the decisive vote against the GOP’s last repeal effort, in July. Once again, the 81-year-old senator, battling brain cancer in the twilight of a remarkable career, emerged as the destroyer of his party’s signature promise to voters.

    President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell have both been pushing hard for the bill in recent days, and McCain’s best friend in the Senate, Graham, was an author. Trump declared during the presidential campaign that he would quickly demolish Obamacare and “it will be easy.”

    Democrats are unanimously opposed. GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky has announced his opposition and GOP Sen. Susan Collins of Maine said Friday she, too, was leaning against supporting the bill.

    Along with McCain, that would leave Republicans with 49 votes, at most, for the bill. They would need 50, plus Vice President Mike Pence to break a tie, in order to prevail in the 100-member Senate.

    GOP leaders had hoped to bring the legislation to the floor next week. They face a Sept. 30 deadline, at which point special rules that prevent a Democratic filibuster will expire.

    Democrats hailed McCain’s announcement and pledged to commit to the bipartisan process he sought.

    “John McCain shows the same courage in Congress that he showed when he was a naval aviator,” said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. “I have assured Sen. McCain that as soon as repeal is off the table, we Democrats are intent on resuming the bipartisan process.”

    The Graham-Cassidy bill would repeal major pillars of former President Barack Obama’s law, replacing them with block grants to states to design their own programs. Major medical groups are opposed, saying millions would lose insurance coverage and protections, and a bipartisan group of governors also has announced opposition.

    Yet Republican congressional leaders, goaded by GOP voters and the president himself, were determined to give it one last try. Trump spent much of August needling McConnell for his failure to pass a repeal bill, and Republican lawmakers back home during Congress’ summer recess heard repeatedly from voters angered that after seven years of promises to get rid of “Obamacare,” the party had not delivered.

    The House passed its own repeal bill back in May, prompting Trump to convene a Rose Garden celebration which soon began to look premature.

    After the Senate failed in several attempts in July, the legislation looked dead. But Cassidy kept at it with his state-focused approach, and the effort caught new life in recent weeks as the deadline neared, with Trump, hungry for a win and with evidence mounting that the GOP could face severe political repercussions for failing to deliver on promises that had helped the party win control of the House, Senate and White House.

    There was fresh negative attention, too. Late-night TV host Jimmy Kimmel, whose son was born with medical problems, criticized the new repeal effort at length on his show and said the Republicans were lying about what their new program would cover. In a tweet Friday, he thanked McCain “for being a hero again and again and now AGAIN.”

    This past week McConnell fully embraced the Graham-Cassidy bill for the first time and his office declared his intention to bring it to a vote next week.

    Trump tweeted Friday morning that “Rand Paul, or whoever votes against Hcare Bill, will forever (future political campaigns) be known as ‘the Republican who saved ObamaCare.’”

    The bill would get rid of unpopular mandates for people to carry insurance or face penalties. It would repeal the financing for Obama’s health insurance expansion and create a big pot of money states could tap to set up their own programs, with less federal oversight. It would also limit spending for Medicaid, the federal-state program that now covers more than 70 million low income people. Insurance rules that protect people with pre-existing conditions could be loosened through state waivers.

    Over time, the legislation would significantly reduce federal health care dollars now flowing to the states.


    Utah soccer: Junior midfielder Paola van der Veen is playing it forward this season


    The first free kick she scuffs wide with her left foot.The second, an attempt to curl it over a would-be wall of opponents, is skied high beyond the far post.There is one shot left as Paola van der Veen is the last Ute off the practice field on a damp,...

    The first free kick she scuffs wide with her left foot.

    The second, an attempt to curl it over a would-be wall of opponents, is skied high beyond the far post.

    There is one shot left as Paola van der Veen is the last Ute off the practice field on a damp, dreary midweek afternoon. This time, she takes a few seconds extra, locates her target, approaches and swings her left foot through the ball from about 20 yards away. This time, she drills the back of the net.

    Utah’s junior Dutch midfielder, it appears, has fully adapted. Coach Rich Manning said he’s seen her comfort level soar, her position in his midfield system stamped and having now been through the rigors of a college soccer season a couple times, the former Netherlands youth national team product is making her mark.

    “It’s been a really pleasant surprise,” Manning said.

    Nicknamed “Po,” the midfielder is second on the team in goals scored (six) for the No. 25-ranked Utes as they open their 2017 Pac-12 schedule Saturday afternoon against rival and reigning NCAA champion, No. 10 USC. Her six goals and three assists (15 points), currently ranks second in Pac-12 play.

    Back home in Leidschendam, Netherlands, van der Veen grew up an attacking midfielder. Although she saw the bulk of her minutes as a left-sided defender with her former club team, ADO den Haag, and youth national team, her initial college visit to Utah allowed her to speak freely. Getting forward, threatening defenses, initiating goal-scoring chances, was her forte.

    “That’s where my heart was,” she said.

    No. 10 USC at No. 25 Utah
    Kickoff • Saturday, 2 p.m. at Ute Field
    TV • Pac-12 Mountain
    Live Stream • Pac-12.com/live
    Records• USC 6-1-0, Utah 5-2-1
    Series history • Utah is 2-7-1 all-time against USC
    Last meeting • USC 1, Utah 0 (2016 NCAA Regional semifinal)

    Just eight starts into this year, van der Veen has already tripled her previous career goal total. She started 17 games as a freshman, but saw her sophomore season a year ago — Utah’s most successful season ever in the Pac-12 — cut short due to a knee injury suffered in late August. She tried to push through it, but eventually made the decision to undergo surgery to repair her damaged LCL back in the Netherlands last December.

    Utah’s midfielder didn’t practice all spring. She rehabbed on campus until returning home in April. Manning said he had no idea how van der Veen would look with her boots laced up a couple weeks before preseason started this summer.

    “She’s worked so hard and she just seems like really focused, mentally ready and maybe a little bit of redemption for missing out on the excitement of last year,” Manning said.

    Off the field for nearly a year, van der Veen said it took a few months to trust her knee again, to make the usual movements necessary on the ball and tracking back on defense. Once preseason began, however, the fears dissipated.

    “I felt like this is my year to go,” she said, “and so far, so good.”

    The Utes, van der Veen said, have emphasized more possession early in 2017, which has allowed the midfield of herself, Haylee Cacciacarne, Holly Daugirda and Eden Jacobsen to control the flow of games.

    “Our midfield is amazing this year — it’s not just me,” van der Veen said. “We’re willing to work for each other.”

    And it certainly doesn’t hurt that the Utes now have another established goal-scorer for opponents to worry over.

    “No question,” Manning said. “It’s always a plus-one. If somebody can score one more goal, in these Pac-12 games, that makes the difference.”


    Burst pipe sprays water and mud across I-215 in Salt Lake City

    Burst pipe sprays water and mud across I-215 in Salt Lake City


    A section of Interstate 215 near Wasatch Boulevard turned into a muddy pool Friday after a pipe burst and geysered water onto the road.At 11:10 a.m., water sloughed off a “significant amount of mud” down the hillside at 2900 South, said UDOT...

    A section of Interstate 215 near Wasatch Boulevard turned into a muddy pool Friday after a pipe burst and geysered water onto the road.

    At 11:10 a.m., water sloughed off a “significant amount of mud” down the hillside at 2900 South, said UDOT spokesman John Gleason.

    “Water was shooting out with considerable pressure,” he said.

    Salt Lake City Public Utilities shut off the water and a UDOT plow worked Friday afternoon to push the water and debris off the road.

    Gleason hadn’t heard any reports of car crashes caused by the water and mud before traffic was stopped for the crews to clear the lanes. Traffic going north on I-215 backed up a mile, he said.

    The break won’t affect anyone’s water, confirmed Salt Lake City communications and engagement manager Holly Mullen.

    The Salt Lake Tribune will update this story as information becomes available.

    Holly Richardson: Do we quit just before the harvest?


    Like many families, we planted a garden this year. Our 16-year-old daughter wanted to be in charge. No one argued with her.She spent hours weeding and watering. She labored through the heat of the summer. The garden looks great. But there is one thing...

    Like many families, we planted a garden this year. Our 16-year-old daughter wanted to be in charge. No one argued with her.

    She spent hours weeding and watering. She labored through the heat of the summer. The garden looks great. But there is one thing she does not want to do. She does not want to harvest the “fruits of her labor.”

    She hates picking the beans, zucchini, tomatoes, peppers, cantaloupe and watermelon. There is not one thing she wants to harvest. She would rather see the fruits and vegetables rot on the vine than pick them.

    It’s made me think. How often do we get close to the harvest and just stop?

    Why do 92 percent of New Year’s resolutions go by the wayside by February 1? Or why do 97 percent of the people who begin writing a book never finish? How many unfinished projects do we have laying around? Why do we give up instead of sticking it out?

    I read a book this week by author Jon Acuff called “Finish: Give Yourself the Gift of Done.” In it, he says the reason many people quit is they are overcome by perfectionism. After all, we reason if you can’t do something perfectly, better not to do it at all. I have kids who would rather get D’s on purpose than try to do well and “only” get a B. I would rather spend eight months worrying about getting the colors “just right” on a new website than actually launch it. I mean who does stuff like that?! Turns out, a lot of people do.

    Acuff runs a 30-day course to help people work on their goals. As he looked at the peak time for people to quit, he found that it was Day Two. “The day after perfect,” he calls it. The next highest time to quit is right before the end. Interesting, isn’t it?

    Brené Brown, a well-known shame researcher, wrote a book called “The Gifts of Imperfection.” In it, she says: “Understanding the difference between healthy striving and perfectionism is critical to laying down the shield and picking up your life. Research shows that perfectionism hampers success. In fact, it’s often the path to depression, anxiety, addiction, and life paralysis … Healthy striving is self-focused: “How can I improve?” Perfectionism is other-focused: “What will they think?’”

    Gay Hendricks, author of “The Big Leap: Conquer Your Hidden Fear and Take Life to the Next Level” says it another way: “Each of us has an inner thermostat setting that determines how much love, success, and creativity we allow ourselves to enjoy. When we exceed our inner thermostat setting, we will often do something to sabotage ourselves, causing us to drop back into the old, familiar zone where we feel secure.” He says we “Upper Limit” ourselves, like the young woman who deliberately bombed her last semester in college and then could not graduate.

    This does not mean we don’t quit things all the time. I quit drinking soda three months ago. I quit ballet lessons when I was 9. I quit worrying about folding fitted sheets a long time ago. The key is knowing when to quit and why and when to persevere. Unltramarathoner Dick Collins says “Decide before the race the conditions that will cause you to stop and drop out. You don’t want to be out there saying, “Well gee, my leg hurts, I’m a little dehydrated, I’m sleepy, I’m tired, and it’s cold and windy.” And talk yourself into quitting. If you are making a decision based on how you feel at that moment, you will probably make the wrong decision.”

    When it comes to our garden, we have all pitched in to bring in the harvest. Sometimes, that’s just what we need - a team who has our backs, who will fill in when we just can’t do it anymore. Here’s to moving past perfectionism and on to actually finishing.

    Holly Richardson starts far more than she actually finishes, but recently, she finished a research project, finished a graduate paper and finished canning tomatoes for the season.


    Cops: 8-year-old girl helps drive drunken Pennsylvania man


    Darlington, Pa. • Police say a drunken Pennsylvania man had an 8-year-old girl drive him around until someone saw the car moving recklessly and called 911.WPXI-TV reports the bizarre incident involving 24-year-old Kevin Cook happened on Sept. 3 in...

    Darlington, Pa. • Police say a drunken Pennsylvania man had an 8-year-old girl drive him around until someone saw the car moving recklessly and called 911.

    WPXI-TV reports the bizarre incident involving 24-year-old Kevin Cook happened on Sept. 3 in Darlington Township, Beaver County.

    That’s where township police say in a criminal complaint that someone reported seeing the child driving and almost wrecking the car twice about 7:30 p.m.

    Police say the girl stopped the car when another motorist became upset and got out of his car, yelling at her and Cook. That’s when the girl told police Cook made her switch seats so he could get behind the wheel before police arrived.

    Police say Cook was so drunk he couldn’t finish a field sobriety test.

    The New Castle man doesn’t have an attorney listed in court records.

    Alleged victims can testify in one another’s sexual assault trials, judge rules in Torrey Green case


    A judge has ruled that six of the seven women who have accused former Utah State University football star Torrey Green of sexual assault will be allowed to testify at one another’s trials.Green is charged in 1st District Court with 12 felonies in...

    A judge has ruled that six of the seven women who have accused former Utah State University football star Torrey Green of sexual assault will be allowed to testify at one another’s trials.

    Green is charged in 1st District Court with 12 felonies in connection with the testimony of seven women who say the athlete sexually assaulted them when he was a student in Logan.

    Each case has been filed in court separately, and prosecutors have said each case will go to trial individually. But they have asked Judge Brian Cannell to allow them to present evidence and testimony from each of the seven alleged victims at the respective trials.

    In a written ruling filed Thursday, Cannell said there were enough similarities in six of the seven cases to allow their testimonies to be heard at the other trials.

    Cannell noted several similarities between the cases in his ruling: Four of the alleged victims said they met Green on the dating app Tinder. Six of them testified that they were assaulted during their first time alone with the defendant in his apartment.

    Five women reported that Green put on a movie before the alleged assault. And five said Green had told each of them “she would enjoy it.” All, the judge wrote, said they verbally and physically communicated with Green that they did not consent.

    “The court finds that this testimony of the events is highly similar to the others,” Cannell wrote about one alleged victim’s testimony.

    But there was one woman’s testimony that was not similar to the others, Cannell wrote in his ruling. In her case, she testified that she did not meet Green on Tinder, and said she was assaulted during her third meeting with the defendant. She also testified that she was assaulted during a party at Green’s apartment, while others were present.

    Cannell said because of these differences, her case did not “fall into the same general category” as the other accounts — and he ruled evidence from her case can not be heard at the other trials.

    The judge noted that his ruling does not “minimize” that alleged victim’s allegations against Green.

    Deputy Cache County Attorney Spencer Walsh said Friday that prosecutors agree with the judge’s decision.

    “We appreciate the courage that these women have demonstrated in both speaking to law enforcement and testifying in court about their experiences,” he said.

    Skye Lazaro, Green’s defense attorney, declined to comment Friday.

    Prosecutors had asked for the evidence to be admitted under what’s called the doctrine of chances, a legal rule that allows evidence of other bad acts to be presented at a trial to show it is unlikely that a defendant would be innocently involved in similar situations repeatedly.

    Several of the women publicly aired allegations in a Salt Lake Tribune story published in July 2016, just after Green had signed a contract to play football in the NFL.

    Each of the four women included in the July 2016 story had previously reported their alleged assaults to police. The Tribune’s reporting prompted Cache County prosecutors to re-examine sexual-assault allegations lodged against Green in 2015. Other alleged victims have come forward, and since July, prosecutors have investigated at least 15 sexual-assault allegations against Green.

    Green, 23, has pleaded not guilty to all of the charges. He is being held in the Cache County jail without the opportunity to post bail. Trial dates have not yet been scheduled.

    The blacksmith, the taxidermist and the violin-maker: These Utahns are keeping traditional professions alive


    They work with their hands, heating and shaping metal into tools, fashioning wood into beautiful acoustic instruments, or tinkering with tiny cogs to restore an antique timepiece to working order.Their professions might harken back to another era, but...

    They work with their hands, heating and shaping metal into tools, fashioning wood into beautiful acoustic instruments, or tinkering with tiny cogs to restore an antique timepiece to working order.

    Their professions might harken back to another era, but the Utahns who make their living via timeworn skills say they offer more life and energy than any office job could.

    Here are their stories:

    The Luthier

    As the son of Peter Prier — the late founder of the Violin Making School of America in downtown Salt Lake City — it was always expected that Daniel Prier would follow the family business and passion. But though Daniel Prier fashioned his first violin at the age of 12, what he really wanted was to be a professional athlete.

    But his athletic dreams fell flat, so he went to his father’s school for three years to pursue violin making. Peter Prier expected greatness, and Daniel recalls feeling pressure to be the best student in his class.

    So he transferred to a school in Chicago for the final three years of his luthier education. It was there, practicing under master makers away from the family legacy, that he found a calling for the craft.

    Now, he runs Peter Prier & Sons Violins (308 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City) while restoring and building instruments of his own with an eye for perfection.

    Making one violin can take 350 hours; a cello, 500 hours. ”There’s so much variance and so much soul in the sound of an acoustic instrument that you can never grow tired,” Prier says. ”It’s an endless cycle.”

    The Blacksmiths

    Michael Miller-Imperiale and Matt Danielson started as backyard blacksmiths, but opened Wasatch Forge (3345 S. 300 West, South Salt Lake) three years ago as their hobby evolved into a profession.

    Danielson says he was hesitant to become a full-time blacksmith because of the economic pressures and responsibilities associated with making it his “day job.” However, as he honed his craft and began passing his skills on as a teacher, he found a rekindled enthusiasm.

    The duo respect the history of shaping metal while trying to advance the craft by training apprentice smiths — and there are plenty — who have been lured to learn by a desire to shape steel with force and fire.

    ”The fact that you can take dirt from the ground, burn it, and then turn it into a sword that fells kingdoms is magical,” Danielson says.

    The Taxidermist

    Andrea Silva’s passion for collecting and studying bones and skeletons transformed into an interest in taxidermy when she began an apprenticeship in a professional shop in West Valley City.

    After her mentor closed his shop, she had a choice: find another taxidermist to train under, or open her own taxidermy business. She founded Remnant Preservations in 2015 to try her hand at preserving animals — from house pets to hunting trophies.

    Silva spends 10 to 30 hands-on hours with each animal, but the entire taxidermy process can take a year from start to finish — from fleshing out and salting the carcass, to sending the animal’s hide to a tanner to mounting and finishing the trophy.

    She says she’s drawn to the artistic skill that taxidermy demands — especially the finishing touch of painting an animal’s glass eyes, which “gives it life.”

    The Remnant shop is now closed, but Silva says she will continue taking on projects in a smaller capacity.

    The Watchmaker

    Aaron Recksiek always wears two watches — one a mechanical Swiss watch, the other an electronic smartwatch — to embrace both the past and future of timekeeping.

    ”The fact that these things were built to withstand the passage of time, but then still be precise instruments, is amazing,” he says.

    He spent his childhood working at his great-uncle’s Mt. Olympus Clock Shop (2265 E. 3900 South, Holladay), which has been open since 1958. He did maintenance projects, helped customers around the shop and gradually learned to work on clocks after graduating from high school.

    Recksiek was interested in learning the more complex and formal steps of the watch repair process, but didn’t think it was his calling until the middle of attending a two-year professional program. Recksiek fell in love with the micromechanics curriculum — making specialized miniature parts for the watches, and the tools to fix them.

    He spends hours each day with a magnification lens on his right eye to restore timepieces to working order. One Rolex repair can take a full day, with smaller maintenance tweaks for other watches sprinkled in.

    The Sign Painters

    Katy Willis and Natalie Mella help fellow craftspeople advertise their crafts. Dubbed ”The Sign Witches” (Facebook.com/signwitches), the duo design, print, transfer and hand-paint signs for businesses from restaurants to yoga studios to manufacturers.

    Their customized, personal work gives each business a look that speaks to the its ethos, history or sense of fun. Clients include Caputo’s, Creative Energies Solar, Diamond Line Delivery, The Point Pilates, Rawtopia and Yoko Ramen.

    ”People are always going to want something that has a human touch. People are always going to want craft and art,” Willis says. “So, we’ll be here to paint their signs.”

    Utah Jazz raising money for cancer patient and superfan J.P. Gibson with “J.P. Strong” T-shirts

    Utah Jazz raising money for cancer patient and superfan J.P. Gibson with “J.P. Strong” T-shirts


    Of all the basketball players who have signed a contract with the Utah Jazz over four decades, J.P. Gibson is the only one who ever used a purple crayon.Back in 2014, the then-5-year-old leukemia patient captured the hearts of the organization and its...

    Of all the basketball players who have signed a contract with the Utah Jazz over four decades, J.P. Gibson is the only one who ever used a purple crayon.

    Back in 2014, the then-5-year-old leukemia patient captured the hearts of the organization and its fans when he signed a one-day contract with the Jazz. In the years since, he’s developed relationships with players and team officials who celebrated his gradual recovery and apparent remission earlier this year.

    Then in July, a tough blow to stomach: Josh Gibson, J.P.’s dad, told the world through social media that his son was going through another bout with cancer. Another Jazz fan, who had never met the Gibsons before, felt that he had to do something.

    “I don’t know why I felt impressed to do this — I’m usually the kind of person who tries to stick to himself,” said Steven C. Diaz, designer who lives in the Salt Lake Valley. “But I saw a need, and I wanted to see if I could help in some way.”

    Diaz decided to put his talents to work, and he created a design: A Jazz note form the “J” in J.P.’s initials, with “Strong” written into the straight edge of the “P.” He imagined the logo appearing on a shirt which he could sell to help the family.

    After working with the Jazz and the NBA to clear legal hurdles, Diaz handed over the rights to the shirt and the design to the Jazz. On Wednesday, just days before J.P.’s eighth birthday on Sunday, “J.P. Strong” shirts went on sale for the first time.

    Within two hours, the Jazz had sold 212, according to Miller Group spokesman Frank Zang. By the end of the day, the initial order of 500 shirts had sold out.

    “It’s amazing seeing all the people who care,” Josh Gibson told The Tribune. “It really does make a difference.”

    In one sense, it makes a financial difference for a family facing at least two more years of costly cancer treatments: All proceeds from shirt sales are being donated to help cover J.P.’s medical costs. The Jazz received another shipment of shirts on Friday, and they’ll also be available at an Oct. 6 preseason game against the Phoenix Suns (the Jazz hope J.P. will feel well enough to appear).

    Zang said the T-shirt sales fits in with larger organizational goals of the Jazz, which are also fighting cancer through their “5 for the Fight” campaign represented by patches on the team jerseys this year. But with the Gibsons, the effort is much more personal: Many within the organization, including Zang, count the Gibsons as friends and have followed J.P.’s health throughout the years.

    “ It was a punch to the gut when the cancer returned this summer because we’ve always seen him as so young and energetic and fun to be around,” Zang said. “It’s gratifying the way people respond. You can have these causes, but when things like this happen, they really hit home.”

    The campaign has also sent a powerful message to the Gibsons, who have seen just how embraced their son is by the larger Utah Jazz community with the shirt sales. He’s been in the hospital several times in the past two months, and seeing the support has a galvanizing effect on his spirit as he goes for another round with cancer, Josh Gibson said.

    “He thinks that’s really cool: What kid wouldn’t want the team to make a shirt for them?” he said. “We love the Jazz. They’ve always been there for us, checking in on our family. … It breaks our heart to be in position again, but it’s been a great blessing to our family to have that in our life.”

    One of those new friends is Diaz, who hopes to meet the Gibsons in person for the first time on Oct. 6. Diaz, who has three children of his own, said he got emotional when he saw his T-shirt become a reality and understood how it would help the family.

    “I couldn’t even imagine what the Gibsons are going through,” he said. “I don’t know if I’d have the strength I see from them to get through it. I definitely think that was a reason I felt like I needed to do something.”


    Utah forecast: Valley rain and mountain snow


    Valley rain — and yes, mountain snow — is expected to continue through the weekend in northern Utah.The National Weather Service predicts light rain will continue in the Salt Lake valley through the weekend, and snow accumulation can be expected...

    Valley rain — and yes, mountain snow — is expected to continue through the weekend in northern Utah.

    The National Weather Service predicts light rain will continue in the Salt Lake valley through the weekend, and snow accumulation can be expected above 6,000 feet.

    By Sunday, “significant” amounts of snow could fall across portions of the central Utah mountains, Uintas and possible higher passes across Wyoming.

    The high temperatures around Salt Lake City will remain in the mid-50s throughout the weekend, with lows in the 40s.

    It will stay much drier in the southern part of the state, with highs in the low 70s expected through the weekend.

    Ask Ann Cannon: I’m not in love with my friends’ new romance


    Dear Ann Cannon • I have two longtime friends who recently started dating each other, and it’s freaking me out.Some backstory: I’ve seen several friends-dating-friends situations go poorly before, with me stuck in the middle when the relationship...

    Dear Ann Cannon • I have two longtime friends who recently started dating each other, and it’s freaking me out.

    Some backstory: I’ve seen several friends-dating-friends situations go poorly before, with me stuck in the middle when the relationship goes south — including an instance that also ended a friendship for me.

    Though I love to hear all the gory relationship details — and my curiosity about these two seeming opposites is off the charts — my instinct is to stay as far away from this as I can. But I am worried about coming across as disapproving when I shut down conversations about the relationship, and I don’t want to sound pedantic by explaining, “Now see here, I don’t think I can be involved for X and Y reasons.” I also don’t want to be a harbinger of gloom (“When you inevitably break up …”). So what, if anything, should I say when one or the other tells me about their plans?

    — Wary

    Dear Wary • The situation you describe is exactly why anti-fraternization rules exist in some workplaces — to protect office morale and prevent collateral damage to office bystanders in case a romance blows up.

    I think your instinct to put some distance between you and this budding relationship is a good one. You can do that by not asking your friends questions about it, even if you’re dying (I know I would be!) to hear “all the gory details.”

    So what do you do if either friend brings up the topic with you? I don’t think you have to say anything specifically to shut down the conversation. You can listen and smile and indicate that you love both parties VERY MUCH and that you wish them both THE VERY BEST. Then (maybe?) you can attempt to move the conversation in another direction. That way, if and when this couple break up, you will have politely signaled to them all along that you are not Team This or Team That.

    Or at least we can hope. These things are always easier on paper than they are in real life.

    The challenge for you right now will be to rein in your natural curiosity about the course of (possibly) true love and resist the temptation to ask questions. Be strong. You can do it!

    Dear Ann Cannon • My three siblings and I are faced with the ugly reality of telling our mother to discontinue driving due to her slowed response time and fragility at an advanced age. There was hope she would graciously make this decision herself and do just that. But so far that hasn’t happened, and I don’t think it will. Any suggestions about how to handle this situation?

    — Concerned Daughter

    Dear Concerned • My mother vividly remembers the day her father handed over his car keys without any prompting. Although he’d been both a bus driver and a mail carrier in rural Wyoming, my grandfather came to the conclusion on his own that it was time to leave the driving to somebody else.

    “That was the greatest gift he ever gave me,” my mother has said.

    Many adult children aren’t so lucky. Like you and your siblings, they’re faced with the unenviable task of asking a parent to essentially give up his or her independence.

    I’ve seen families take different approaches. Some stage “an intervention” with all the siblings present, so that each one can express his or her concern for the safety of the parent, as well as for others who share the road. Some families select one sibling — the one a parent will actually listen to — to make the case for not driving anymore. And some recruit a trusted non-family member, such as a primary health-care provider, to do the job.

    All approaches require kindness and sensitivity. None of us likes to acknowledge diminished capacity — in ourselves or in the people we love.

    It must be said, however, that all of these approaches generally meet with resistance, even fierce anger, which is why many families often resort to hiding the keys and hoping there isn’t a second set somewhere.

    This is a hard thing for all of you — your mother and your siblings. Good luck.

    Do you have a question for Ann? Send it to [email protected] or visit the Ask Ann Cannon page on Facebook.

    Ririe-Woodbury’s ‘Parallax’ is an evening of exploration


    It’s the movies that have really been running things in America ever since they were invented. They show you what to do, how to do it, when to do it, how to feel about it, and how to look how you feel about it. — Andy WarholRirie-Woodbury Dance...

    It’s the movies that have really been running things in America ever since they were invented. They show you what to do, how to do it, when to do it, how to feel about it, and how to look how you feel about it. — Andy Warhol

    Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company presents “Parallax” next weekend at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, opening its 2017-18 season with three distinctive works: “Unstruck” by minimalist choreographer Kate Weare, “Pantheon” by maximalist dance-artist Raja Feather Kelly, and RW artistic director Daniel Charon’s “Exilic Dances.”

    The three choreographers on the program are not only strikingly different from one another, but each has diverged from her or his signature practice in small or significant ways.

    Brooklyn-based choreographer Kelly connected with RW when he won the 2017 Princess Grace Foundation USA award, a respected fellowship that pairs a developing choreographer with a professional dance company to encourage mutual artistic advancement. He is one of only three choreographers in the nation to win the award this year, and will also be collaborating with composer Sam Crawford on an original score.

    “I describe my work as dance-theater combined with visual art,” Kelly said. “I am choreographing an experience, not just a dance, not just a body, but an experience.”

    He incorporates wigs and props and even paints the dancers bodies. The theatrical experience begins long before the house lights go down with Kelly calculating “how people enter the theater, how they sit down, how they learned about the show and what they already know about my work.” If people know anything about Kelly’s work, it’s that his point of view is filtered through the lens of Pop Art icon Andy Warhol.

    “Warhol shaped the culture I grew up with. He died in 1987 and I was born in 1987,” Kelly said. “I realize Warhol didn’t change art. He changed the way art was seen. In my choreography, I’m not interested in inventing new movement; I try to frame the movement so people will see it differently. Hopefully, it wakes people up to see the movement in new ways and question their beliefs about it and where they got them.”

    The title of the dance he has choreographed for RW, “Pantheon,” is a reference to Kelly’s thematic inspiration “The Rite of Spring.” His treatment of the well-known plot, where a community chooses one person to sacrifice for the benefit of all, is viewed through a Warhol lens. And though all of Kelly’s other works include Warhol’s name in the title, “Pantheon” is the first to only be guided by Warhol’s spirit and his famous “15 minutes of fame” quote and belief that many of us have “learned feelings” that come from movies and television.

    “We charge our artists, celebrities and public figures with enormous responsibility to stand in for our desires and dreams. It takes a heavy toll on them and in that way our ‘chosen ones’ sacrifice themselves for our ‘greater good,’ ” Kelly said.

    Also featured on the program is Weare, whose company celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2015 in a retrospective of her signature duets and trios. The 2015 premiere of “Unstruck” revealed a new direction and deeper emotional quality in her choreography, a challenge RW will also bring to the stage. One of the two men’s roles in “Unstruck” was created on former Kate Weare Company dancer T.J. Spauer (2011-15), RW company member from 2006 to 2010.

    Rounding out the program is Charon’s “Exilic.” Charon said he modeled the work on stage-show/Broadway musicals using klezmer music some may recognize from “Fiddler on the Roof.” Contemporary dance performances don’t often include show tunes, but Charon has a background in musical theater and “Exilic” contains the very timely theme of immigration.

    Broadway musicals from “West Side Story” to “Hamilton” have conveyed serious social and political themes that have influenced attitudes across the glob. Social scientists have suggested that music intensifies the themes and the movement material.

    “I needed to choreograph something that would balance the program, challenge myself and appeal to our Salt Lake audience that I’ve noticed is very drawn to musical theater,” Charon said. “I’m not using the movement vocabulary of musical theater, but I am engaging the traditional words and music in the score.”

    RW’s season ends in the spring with a full-length evening work by Charon. He says he is toying with the idea of making it a “sci-fi dance about modern-day technology.” It will be performed in the Eccles Theater Black Box, so the physical set could be in the round or myriad other possibilities.

    RW Executive Director Jena Woodbury said the company’s schedule is chock full this season with tours in the U.S. and abroad (ririewoodbury.com/touring/community-engagement-and-education). The new Family Series offers a one-hour, $10 ticket price version on Saturdays during the official run of each show. And the outreach program is being extended to include multicultural senior citizen centers with the help of former RW dancer Juan Carlos Claudio’s organization MINDING MOTION For Graceful Aging and Grey Matters; both focus on aging adults and those with brain disease such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

    “We want to fulfill our promise to the community that ‘dance is for everyone,’ ” Woodbury said. “It’s not just a phrase, it’s a commitment.”


    Parallax by Ririe Woodbury Dance Company
    When • Thursday-Saturday, Sept. 28 - 30, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 30, Family Series Matinee “Moving Parts” (1-hour show), 1 p.m.
    Where • Jeanné Wagner Theatre at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. Broadway, Salt Lake City
    Tickets • $35, $15 for students and seniors; family matinee, $10 or 5 packs for $45; artsaltlake.org or www.ririewoodbury.com
    To learn more about Grey Matters or Minding Motion, go to www.juancarlosclaudio.com/dance-for-parkinson-disease

    Gehrke: The four things you should know about the once-secret Bears Ears recommendations

    Gehrke: The four things you should know about the once-secret Bears Ears recommendations


    We’re finally starting to get an idea of what might be in store for the Bears Ears National Monument, and it isn’t pretty.First, The Salt Lake Tribune used documents obtained through open records requests to reveal the state’s behind-the-scenes...

    We’re finally starting to get an idea of what might be in store for the Bears Ears National Monument, and it isn’t pretty.

    First, The Salt Lake Tribune used documents obtained through open records requests to reveal the state’s behind-the-scenes recommendation to wipe out more than 90 percent of the current monument, protecting a peanut-shaped 120,000 acres around the Bears Ears Buttes.

    Then, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s secretive report to President Donald Trump finally leaked, including its recommendations that Bears Ears be shrunk and a handful of other monuments be reduced in size or revised.

    There really are four big takeaways:

    1. The state isn’t serious about protecting antiquities

    Hardly any — less than 10 percent — of the total Bears Ears monument has actually been inventoried by archaeologists since the 1930s, but what they’ve found so far is a stunning array of irreplaceable historic sites.

    They’ve documented 8,480 known sites — that means ruins or clusters of artifacts like pots or other items. The vast majority of them date back to before the 1800s and more than two-thirds of the known sites that have been evaluated would qualify for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

    It would be reasonable to assume that there could be tens of thousands more priceless antiquities in the unstudied areas of Cedar Mesa and Indian Creek. There are well-documented instances of looting inside the monument, even though Rep. Mike Noel blames badgers for the thefts. Really.

    But the state has told Zinke it wants just a tiny fraction of those priceless relics protected under monument status.

    I’m not arguing that 1.35 million acres is the perfect size or will protect every pot in the region. But a 120,000-acre monument, like the state proposed, would leave vast swaths of history without protection.

    Even San Juan County commissioners, no fans of federal land management, recognized the value of Cedar Mesa when they included it in their early 422,000-acre monument proposal in February.

    2. The governor wants it both ways

    Gov. Gary Herbert argued recently that monument designations, as he put it, place a target on sensitive areas and are magnets for tourists who could damage or steal the relics.

    He’s not wrong.

    But the governor is still proposing a monument on a smaller scale and in an area that contains some of the highest concentrations of artifacts. So the tourist attraction and subsequent risk doesn’t go away.

    To make matters worse, Herbert also proposed two national recreation areas, one in Cedar Mesa and the other in Indian Creek. Recreation areas, as you may have pieced together on your own, are designed to be places where people go to recreate. Most of the existing recreation areas are in highly trafficked areas where people go boating or four-wheeling — think Lake Mead or Glen Canyon around Lake Powell.

    A miniscule monument and two large recreation areas would create as much — if not more — tourism in the area and provide far fewer protections, including potentially allowing off-road vehicles. It would be an absolute nightmare for the antiquities the governor says he’s so worried about protecting.

    3. There are no real energy resources anywhere in Bears Ears

    Last session, the Utah Legislature called for the repeal of the Bears Ears Monument citing, among other reasons, the way it would impede the plentiful energy extraction, sapping revenue that otherwise could flow into the state’s school system.

    But one of the most striking things when you look at the state’s Bears Ears maps is how, aside from a band of uranium deposits north of the buttes, there really are no energy or mineral resources to speak of anywhere inside the monument — no coal, no oil, no gas, not even any potash.

    You can see the area speckled with oil wells that have been drilled over the years, but the oil just isn’t there.

    Then you look east, over Comb Ridge that forms the boundary for the monument, and it is a bonanza. It’s almost like, when the monument was designated, the boundaries weren’t arbitrary and the Interior Department drew the borders to avoid damaging the potential jobs and wealth in the county.

    Neat how that works, right?

    The information in the map undermines the argument the monument is costing San Juan County and the state jobs — but that doesn’t mean they’ll stop complaining about it.

    4. Zinke still hasn’t done his homework

    I’d been warned for more than a month by people in “the know” that Zinke’s report was going to be a dud — the Interior Department is still missing too many top people and was too short-staffed to take on an actual review.

    And it was.

    Zinke’s leaked memo reads like a term paper a D-plus high schooler would have slapped together the night before it was due. It dutifully rehashes all the anti-monument talking points, dismisses the public sentiment in favor of national monuments generally and sprinkles in some pretty glaring misstatements — like how a New Mexico monument abuts the U.S.-Mexico border and creates border control issues, even though it was drawn to be five miles away from the border, or that it limits traditional sacred uses in Bears Ears, even though it specifically does not.

    It doesn’t include specific suggestions for boundaries or scale of any revisions to existing monuments. That work apparently still needs to be done.

    Maybe the aim was to buy some time, but really what it does is wastes time. We all know President Donald Trump is going to shrink the monuments and we all know it will result in a flurry of lawsuits. So get on with it.

    The sooner the courts decide the matter, the sooner we can get serious about protecting the American Indian artifacts in Bears Ears that, until then, are in peril.

    Cliven Bundy firing lawyer with trial approaching in Vegas


    Las Vegas • Cliven Bundy’s defense attorney says the Nevada cattleman and state’s rights figure is firing him, less than three weeks before trial stemming from a 2014 armed standoff with federal agents.Attorney Bret Whipple filed documents Thursday...

    Las Vegas • Cliven Bundy’s defense attorney says the Nevada cattleman and state’s rights figure is firing him, less than three weeks before trial stemming from a 2014 armed standoff with federal agents.

    Attorney Bret Whipple filed documents Thursday asking Chief U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro for a hearing as soon as possible about withdrawing from the case.

    Whipple says the decision is Bundy’s. He says he doesn’t know if Bundy has another lawyer or intends to represent himself.

    It wasn’t immediately clear if the move will affect the trial schedule.

    Jury selection is set to start Oct. 10 for Bundy, two sons and four other men — including two defendants whose retrial ended last month with acquittal on most charges and no verdicts on assault on a federal officer and weapon counts.


    Andrew W.K. wants you to unleash your inner party at his actual party

    Andrew W.K. wants you to unleash your inner party at his actual party


    The music website LoudWire frequently hosts rock musicians for a video series called “Wikipedia: Fact or Fiction,” in which various claims of dubious merit are culled from that artist’s page and either confirmed or dispelled.During a phone...

    The music website LoudWire frequently hosts rock musicians for a video series called “Wikipedia: Fact or Fiction,” in which various claims of dubious merit are culled from that artist’s page and either confirmed or dispelled.

    During a phone interview with The Salt Lake Tribune to preview his show Friday night at the Metro Music Hall in Salt Lake City, rocker and self-proclaimed “King of Partying” Andrew W.K. (aka Andrew Fetterly Wilkes-Krier) addressed a few of his notorious entries.

    His father is a well-known legal scholar and his mother is a concert violinist?

    “She’s not a violinist — I’ve seen that up on different bios,” he said. “That has been a persistent … I mean, I wish she was a violinist. I think, more than anything, she wishes she was a violinist. But she’ll settle for being the world’s greatest mom.”

    That one can’t hold a candle, though, to what is arguably one of the most bonkers lines to appear on a musician’s Wiki page:

    In 2012, it was believed that the U.S. State Department had named W.K. the U.S. Cultural Ambassador to Bahrain.

    “Yes, yes! That is true,” he exclaimed.

    Wait — the Andrew W.K. known for songs such as “It’s Time to Party,” “Party Hard” and “Party Til You Puke”? The Andrew W.K. whose 2001 album, “I Get Wet,” features a picture of him bleeding profusely after allegedly smacking himself in the face with a brick in order to get an evocative cover shot?

    OK, looks like story time is in order.

    “They give a slightly different take on what actually happened, and I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt, although I don’t think they deserve the benefit of the doubt,” W.K. said. “But the short story is that a gentleman who was in charge of organizing cultural exchange events in the Middle East had reached out to my manager. … Everything got greenlit and approved, and I was gonna go to Bahrain, a place I’d never been, and meet with young people there, students. I don’t think I was actually even going to play music, I was just going to talk with them and go to school with them for the day, and talk about my experiences as a rock musician and as an American, and have a hopefully peaceful and mutually beneficial exchange. And once we were officially given permission to announce the trip, it all just came crashing down. I think what had happened was that the trip had been planned and approved by some lower levels of the State Department, but once it was announced, someone — we were told it was the second in charge under Hillary Clinton — had seen the photo of my bloody-nose picture, which is sort of like my logo, I guess, and said, ‘We can’t send this person on anything representing the United States in any official capacity. Look at his picture. Look at his song titles about partying. This is not appropriate.’ And they canceled the whole trip.

    “I was very upset, I was very hurt. I was really excited about it, I thought I was going to do a very good job, and I was quite disappointed that my own country was embarrassed to send me as a representative, because of something I thought of as so shallow, really judging a book by its cover,” he added. “They didn’t really take the time — these higher-ups that canceled the trip — to take a look at who I was or what I did. I understood, of course, why they canceled, but that’s why it seemed so absurd that they ever offered it to me in the first place. … In the end, if a cultural ambassadorship is to inspire conversation or get people talking about culture and parts of the world, this probably achieved more with the way that it went than actually if I had gone.”

    The thing is, W.K. is, in fact, more than the sum of his stereotypes.

    He’s a classically trained pianist. His all-time favorite piece of music is George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue.” He’s become an in-demand speaker on the lecture circuit.

    And yes, he speaks and sings about partying. But you’ve never heard such an erudite explanation on espousing the virtues of partying in your life.

    In recalling the experience of being exposed to music he loved early on, he noted, “that feeling was so undeniably good, was so joyful, so righteous that you … can’t imagine not feeling that way again, and you quickly orient yourself towards that feeling. And I had to start finding a way to describe that feeling myself, or identify that feeling, and to me, it became sort of quickly described as this partying feeling, the feeling that you were celebrating life itself. And I think that, in a way, I found music to be a celebration, or even an amplification of the life force, like getting to feel alive in all the textures that it has to offer. … And trying to use that feeling as a foundation or almost as a fuel source to experience life, to use that good feeling as a way to have the strength to experience life, to not just get through life, but to revel in life. That seemed like maybe it could be a career! Ha! I don’t know! But I wanted to be in this state of mind as much as I could, and promoting this state of mind, and promoting this feeling, this euphoric kind of feeling. And I think anyone who’s a very young child to a much older person can understand that feeling as ‘partying’ — even if they don’t like partying or they think they don’t like partying, they understand what it’s meant to imply. It’s meant to imply an acknowledgment of goodness, of freeness, a feeling of being free, and a kind of undeniable feeling that even though life is very intense, it’s still worth living.”

    Now, he’s looking to espouse that in yet more musical forms.

    He just announced that his first full-length album in more than a decade will be released March 2, 2018. He’ll perform some of those tunes at Friday night’s show, where he’ll be backed by a full band.

    In the meantime, he’s grateful that fans are still giving him the chance to spread the gospel of partying.

    “I never intended for it to be such a long and formal full-length album cycle. So once I realized that much time had gone by, it was quite frightening, quite shocking, quite sobering for me, and I realized, ‘Wow, I’ve got to do things while I can do things,’ ” he said. “I would like this to begin the prime era of productivity, of prolific musicmaking and playing. And I feel more driven and determined than ever before and very thankful that I even have a chance to be doing anything after this many years. It’s been 15, 16 years, and every year that’s gone by has been a gift, and I take this entire opportunity — what’s the best way to say this? — I don’t take any of it for granted, and every year that’s passed, I take it less and less and less for granted.”

    Andrew W.K.
    When • Friday, 8 p.m.
    Where • Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City
    Tickets • $20; Ticketfly

    Nerd seeking nerd: Speed dating at Salt Lake Comic Con is a chance for fans to make cosplay love connections


    If Spider-Man, Wonder Woman, Harry Potter, Harley Quinn, Wolverine and several Jedis were all gathered in a room, the phrase “nervous sexual tension” might not be the first thing that comes to mind.But that’s what happened Thursday on opening night...

    If Spider-Man, Wonder Woman, Harry Potter, Harley Quinn, Wolverine and several Jedis were all gathered in a room, the phrase “nervous sexual tension” might not be the first thing that comes to mind.

    But that’s what happened Thursday on opening night of Sci-Fi Speed Dating at Salt Lake Comic Con, where about 100, mostly costumed, pop-culture fans came together in the hopes of making a nerdy love connection.

    Or at least land a date for the new Thor movie.

    This was the first of 10 hour-long speed dating sessions during Comic Con — two of them reserved for LGBTQ folks — and it’s a big draw each year, said Ryan Glitch, the evening’s referee, who hosts these dating events at around 60 conventions each year.

    “With traditional speed dating, there are no guarantees you’ll have anything in common with anybody,” Glitch said. “Here, even if you’re not a ‘Star Wars’ fan, you at least understand the ‘Star Wars’ fandom because you’re a fan of something too. You have that commonality to meet people and build from.”

    That doesn’t necessarily mean all Comic Con people are naturally compatible.

    “Star Trek” fans versus “Star Wars” fans?

    “Those never seem to work,” Glitch says.

    Marvel fans versus DC fans?

    “That usually results in a couple of bodies.”

    Before things began, Glitch laid down a few ground rules: This is anonymous speed dating, so no exchanging of names or phone numbers — that will be sorted out later if there’s a match. Each pairing has exactly three minutes to get acquainted before the men have to slide one chair to the right and move on to the next woman.

    Glitch, a natural standup comedian, kept things entertaining: a Utah-is-so-white crack, a dig at one dater whose Spider-Man costume he declared to be “too Walmart,” and a tip that “Hi, would you like to see my collection of human fingernails?” is a really bad opening line.

    “I’ve always tried to make people laugh, and in a situation like this, when they’re laughing, they’re not nervous. I figured I could make people laugh and bring them together, that’s the whole reason for doing this,” he said.

    Caitlyn Smith came down from Boise, Idaho, for Comic Con and thought she’d give Sci-Fi Speed Dating a shot. She’s in a bright red wig, dressed as Anastasia from the 1997 animated film of the same name.

    “I’m trying to step out of my boundaries and meet new people,” Smith said. “I’ve tried dating on my own terms and it didn’t work out because they don’t have similar interests. ... I’m very old fashioned. Dating to me is like courtship, so I would rather someone court me to a possible marriage.”

    Sami Newell-Nickel of West Jordan — decked out as Elizabeth Liones from the Japanese anime “The Seven Deadly Sins” — said she was “looking for someone who shares similar interests and who’s willing to travel to other Comic Cons in Sweden and Japan.”

    “If I just get one number out of this, I’ll be happy,” said Slade Trevethick of South Salt Lake, who’s rocking a look from the anime video game “Steins;Gate.”

    “I got to meet a lot of people. Better than last time.”

    Joshua Rush, who lives near Logan and is dressed as a “Star Wars” Sith, said his three-minute dates went really well.

    “It was fun and there were a lot of nice girls, which was really refreshing,” Rush said. “For the $20 registration fee it was well spent. Love has no price like that, right?”

    Rich Lowry: Sovereignty is not a dirty word


    To listen to the commentary, Donald Trump used an inappropriate term at the U.N. — not just “Rocket Man,” but “sovereignty.”It wasn’t surprising that liberal analysts freaked out over his nickname for Kim Jong Un and his warning that we’d...

    To listen to the commentary, Donald Trump used an inappropriate term at the U.N. — not just “Rocket Man,” but “sovereignty.”

    It wasn’t surprising that liberal analysts freaked out over his nickname for Kim Jong Un and his warning that we’d “totally destroy” Kim’s country should it become necessary. These lines were calculated to get a reaction, and they did. More interesting was the allergy to Trump’s defense of sovereign nations.

    Brian Williams of MSNBC wondered whether the repeated use of the word “sovereignty” was a “dog whistle.” CNN’s Jim Sciutto called it “a loaded term” and “a favorite expression of authoritarian leaders.”

    It was a widely repeated trope that Trump’s speech was “a giant gift,” in the words of BuzzFeed, to China and Russia.

    In an otherwise illuminating piece in The Atlantic, Peter Beinart concluded that Trump’s address amounted to “imperialism.” If so, couched in the rhetoric of the mutual respect of nations, it’s the best-disguised imperialist manifesto in history.

    Trump’s critics misrepresent the speech and misunderstand the nationalist vision that Trump was setting out.

    He didn’t defend a valueless international relativism. Trump warned that “authoritarian powers seek to collapse the values, the systems, and alliances that prevented conflict and tilted the world toward freedom since World War II.”

    He praised the U.S. Constitution as “the foundation of peace, prosperity and freedom for the Americans and for countless millions around the globe.”

    “The Marshall Plan,” he said, “was built on the noble idea that the whole world is safer when nations are strong, independent and free.”

    Just window dressing? Trump returned to similar language in his denunciation of the world’s rogue states.

    When critics don’t ignore these passages, they say that they contradict Trump’s emphasis on the sovereignty of all nations. There’s no doubt that there’s a tension in Trump’s emerging marriage between traditional Republican thinking and his instinctive nationalism. Yet he outlined a few key expectations.

    He said, repeatedly, that we want nations committed to promoting “security, prosperity and peace.” And we look for them “to respect the interests of their own people and the rights of every other sovereign nation.”

    Every country that Trump criticized fails one or both of these tests. So, by the way, do Russia and China. Hence Trump’s oblique criticism of their aggression in Ukraine and the South China Sea.

    Trump’s standards aren’t drawn out of thin air. A consistent nationalist believes in the right of every nation to govern itself. Moreover, modern nationalism developed alongside the idea of popular sovereignty — i.e., the people have the right to rule, and the state is their agent, not the other way around.

    Trump’s core claim that “the nation-state remains the best vehicle for elevating the human condition” is indubitably correct; it is what makes self-government possible. If the alternative is being governed by an imperial center or transnational authorities, the people of almost every nation will want — and fight, if necessary — to govern themselves. (See the American Revolution.)

    The U.N. is hardly an inappropriate forum for advancing these ideas. “The Organization,” the U.N. charter itself says, “is based on the principle of the sovereign equality of all its Members.” To the extent that the U.N. is now a gathering place for people hoping the nation-state will be eclipsed, it’s useful to remind them that it’s not going away.

    All that said, there were indeed weaknesses in the speech. First, as usual, Trump’s bellicose lines stepped on the finer points of his message. Second, even if sovereignty is important, it can’t alone bear the weight of being the organizing principle of American foreign policy. Finally, Trump’s foreign-policy vision is clearly a work in progress, as he accommodates himself to the American international role he so long considered a rip-off and waste of time.

    Trump is adjusting to being the head of a sovereign nation — that happens to be the leader of the world.

    [email protected]


    News roundup: Some Trump aides are already looking for the exit


    Some Trump aides are already looking for the exit. Michelle Obama tells SLC crowd she cringes at the culture of fear under Trump. Audit: WGU should repay $700m in financial aid.Happy Friday. A fast-growing number of White House staffers are starting to...

    Some Trump aides are already looking for the exit. Michelle Obama tells SLC crowd she cringes at the culture of fear under Trump. Audit: WGU should repay $700m in financial aid.

    Happy Friday. A fast-growing number of White House staffers are starting to look for the exits, even though the one-year mark of President Donald Trump’s first term is still months away. The aides had planned to stay longer but are now talking to headhunters given the multiple investigations and turmoil that has engulfed the West Wing. [Politico]

    Topping the news: Former first lady Michelle Obama told a Salt Lake City crowd yesterday that she cringes at climate of fear created by the current president. [Trib]

    -> Rep. Chris Stewart tweeted -- and then quickly deleted -- a comment saying that liberals were wetting their pants over President Donald Trump’s speech to the United Nations. [Trib]

    -> A legislative committee took the first step to raise fees for a concealed weapons permit this week to the dismay of The National Rifle Association and the Utah Shooting Sports Council. [Trib]

    -> A new federal audit says Western Governors University should repay some $700 million in financial aid. [Trib] [DNews]

    Tweets of the day: From @zblox: “If you had the parlay of ‘In 2017, Donald Trump will be President and BYU will sell Coke on campus,’ please return Biff’s Almanac.”

    -> From @RobertGehrke: “It’s remarkable the lengths BYU will go to in order to distract people from their lousy football team.”

    -> From @pbump: “Mike Allen should try contacting Spicer over Venmo.”

    -> From @RepChrisStewart: “NK fires missiles over Japan. We do nothing. Putin invades Ukraine No responce. BYU sells coke. I can’t remain silent. The madness has to end.”

    -> From @MEPFuller: If you want to know how great the Graham-Cassidy bill is for states, the bribe for Alaska is that THEY GET TO KEEP OBAMACARE!!

    Happy Birthday: To Courtney Brinkerhoff, Southern Utah director for Sen. Orrin Hatch’s office, and The Salt Lake Tribune’s Tommy Burr. On Sunday to state Rep. Bradley Last, Michael J. Kennedy and Nichole Dunn.

    Behind the Headlines: Tribune reporters Benjamin Wood, Taylor Anderson and Brian Maffly and as well as columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories, including trimming Bears Ears and eliminating the sales tax on food. Each Friday morning, stream “Behind the Headlines” online at kcpw.org or tune in to KCPW 88.3 FM or Utah Public Radio for the broadcast.

    In other news: Turns out, Utah lawmakers did actually pass a resolution encouraging the state court system to keep its current bail system -- but the courts are still going forward with a change. [Trib]

    -> The U.S. Department of Labor filed a motion Thursday to prohibit the use of underage workers by the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and Lyle Jeffs. [Trib]

    -> Wellsville leadership voted unanimously Wednesday night to evaluate the town’s traditional “Sham Battle” reenactment, which has raised concerns about the portrayal of American Indians. [Trib] [Fox13]

    -> Pat Bagley connects Utah’s Wasatch Fault to the earthquakes in Mexico. [Trib]

    -> Paul Rolly, prompted by the new PBS series, offers his take on the effects of the Vietnam War on Americans at home and abroad. [Trib]

    Nationally: President Trump announced economic sanctions on North Korea that allows the Treasury Department to single out companies, banks and individuals that engage in business with the country. [WaPost]

    -> After President Trump’s threats, North Korea’s foreign minister compared him to a “barking dog.” [NYTimes]

    -> Former White House press secretary, Sean Spicer, requested Axios co-founder Mike Allen cease contact through email and text messages. Spicer cited Allen’s attempts to contact as “harassment.” [WaPost]

    -> Facebook will supply congressional investigators with ads associated with the Russian government that were used to interfere with the presidential election. [USAToday]

    Got a tip? A birthday, wedding or anniversary to announce? Email us at [email protected]. If you haven’t already, sign up for our weekday email and get this sent directly to your inbox.

    -- Thomas Burr and Karenna Meredith: Twitter.com/thomaswburr and Twitter.com/karennameredith

    Utah writer lyrically explores the trauma of the Vietnam War

    Utah writer lyrically explores the trauma of the Vietnam War


    Paisley Rekdal kept obsessing over the twisted sculpture made from wrecked plane parts, spoils of war stacked as high as a house.The Salt Lake City poet, temporarily living in Hanoi on a writing fellowship, was consciously working to avoid “trauma...

    Paisley Rekdal kept obsessing over the twisted sculpture made from wrecked plane parts, spoils of war stacked as high as a house.

    The Salt Lake City poet, temporarily living in Hanoi on a writing fellowship, was consciously working to avoid “trauma tourism” while in a country that, disorientingly, referred to the conflict as The American War.

    But Rekdal found she couldn’t look away from the metal tower erected in the courtyard of the Vietnam Military History Museum. She kept trying to puzzle out why the sculpture haunted her, hoping repeated viewings would eventually make her feel less.

    “Propped on a cement slab, the sculpture was a hulking mass of incongruous metals, scorched and dented and scarred, the planes’ spoilers soldered into ailerons, wrenched-off bay doors tossed onto cockpits, windshields haphazarded with cracks,” is how Rekdal, a University of Utah English professor, describes the artwork.

    While she was living in Vietnam, she read a Facebook post about a news story back home in Salt Lake City. On April 26, 2012, Kiet Thanh Ly, 34, bought a knife from the 400 South Smith’s Marketplace, and then in the parking lot proceeded to stab two white men, Tim DeJulis and Keltin Barney, a U. English student.

    “Something about [Ly’s] cry, ‘Why did you kill my people?’ resonated with my visits to this sculpture,” Rekdal writes in her new book, “The Broken Country,” a lyric argument exploring the cultural and genetic trauma that is the continuing legacy of the Vietnam War.

    Rekdal, who was recently named the state’s poet laureate, will launch her book at The King’s English Bookshop on Sept. 30, part of the monthlong, statewide events that make up the 20th annual Utah Humanities Book Festival. (See box for more information.)

    If the festival’s lineup is weighted toward showcasing poetry this year, perhaps that’s because “we have a tendency to turn to poets in tumultuous times,” says Michael McLane, the nonprofit’s literature program officer.

    Disrupting the cultural story

    “What’s really unique about the book is that there are so many different levels of analysis,” says Tom Roche, project editor for the University of Georgia Press. Last year, “The Broken Country” won the prestigious Association of Writers and Writing Programs’ Creative Nonfiction award.

    Rekdal begins the book by disrupting narrative theory — taking literally the idea that trauma disrupts the way we tell stories. The opening chapter reads like a vivid, beautifully detailed journalistic account of a seemingly random attack on a balmy April afternoon at a popular Salt Lake City store.

    “There’s a sense of confusion in the opening of the book, about a crime,” Roche says. “It’s disorienting. There’s pain described vividly. There’s bright lights. The person who was attacked doesn’t know what’s happening. It’s hard to give any meaning to it. Then, gradually, she constructs a story that gives us meaning, or allows us to understand it, at least. By the time you get to the end, you have a narrative of cultural displacement and how it has affected our culture on so many different levels.”

    The Salt Lake stabbing serves to illuminate the larger cultural trauma in the mostly unexplored aftermath of the Vietnam War. For Americans, Vietnam is a metaphor “for loss, for American embarrassment,” Rekdal says. “We trot it out all the time. We are a culture in love with forgetting. We like to say things are over.”

    The book’s prose is absorbing and elegant, filled with thought-provoking and far-ranging insight, says U. English colleague Vincent Cheng. Beyond past wars, the book also considers the plight and conditions of refugees, as well as the homeless.

    It is those layers of exploration that make “The Broken Country” so compelling, its argument summarized in the book’s subtitle: “On Trauma, A Crime, and the Continuing Legacy of Vietnam.” Rekdal explores trauma theory and narrative theory and brain science, as well as her own history as the daughter and niece of Vietnam-era veterans. Further explorations draw upon her interviews with stabbing victims and oral histories from Utah’s Vietnamese refugees, including some who grew up with Ly.

    The history of Paisley

    Rekdal, 46, grew up in Seattle, the daughter of a Chinese-American mother and a father of Norwegian descent. She was, she writes in a poem, “so boringly middle class her parents hadn’t even divorced,” an example of the kind of distance and intimacy she employs in her work.

    She originally planned to be a medieval scholar, earning a master’s degree from the University of Toronto, before she found herself using her research to write poems. She went on to receive an MFA from the University of Michigan.

    The conflicting, shifting nature of identity as a kind of ongoing experiment is one of the themes in Rekdal’s work, says Katharine Coles, a U. colleague and a former Utah poet laureate. “The way she experiences herself in the world is one of the things that make her such a powerful poet.”

    Paisley, her distinctive, hippie-sounding first name, is one of the most Chinese things about her, Rekdal says. Her mother hasn’t ever really explained the choice, although Rekdal has written about the history of all things paisley, including shawls, in a multifaceted poem.

    “I really wish there were a better story,” the poet says, with a sigh. “I’ve asked her and asked her,” and the only answer the daughter received is this: “I’ve always thought it was pretty, and if you ever became famous, you could go by one name.”

    She might not have attained one-name status, but in the literary world she’s been called “a very, very good poet who should be better known,” as Craig Morgan Teicher wrote last year in the Los Angeles Times. “Imaginary Vessels,” her fifth collection, should become the poet’s breakout book, Teicher wrote, calling her work “frighteningly intelligent yet easily understood.”

    The paradox of intimacy and distance can be found woven throughout Rekdal’s work, including her breathtakingly original 2011 memoir, “Intimate: An American Family Photo Album.” The book explores her own mixed-race heritage as she questions the idea of cultural authenticity in Edward S. Curtis’ legendary, turn-of-the-20th-century photographs of American Indians.

    Bridging the gown/town divide

    More than a decade ago, Rekdal was newly divorced when she moved from Wyoming to Salt Lake City, thinking she had moved to the safest place in the West. Until, that is, she became caught up in watching nightly news reports of a woman, Lori Hacking, who had disappeared from her Avenues neighborhood while jogging, themes Rekdal explored in a powerful poem (“Body of Stuffed Female Swift Fox, Natural History Museum”) and essay (“The Lives of Strangers”).

    Maybe that Salt Lake City poem was the beginning of Rekdal’s work bridging Salt Lake City’s gown/town divide, exploring the boundary-crossing paradoxes of Utah. “And what it means to be part of a community that on the surface you don’t have anything in common with,” she told writer Elaine Jarvik in an interview for Continuum, the U.’s alumni magazine.

    In 2013, after teaching a nonfiction class based on Rebecca Solnit’s “Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas,” she launched “Mapping SLC,” intended as an artistic community archive of Utah’s capital city.

    That ambitious place-based project sparked her idea for “Mapping Literary Utah,” a website she plans to launch as the state’s poet laureate. She aims to collect interviews and podcasts archiving the diversity of Utah writers, historic and contemporary, ranging from early Mormon poets to writers who were interned at the Topaz War Relocation Center during World War II. “Utah is neither monolithic nor homogeneous, regardless of how others outside our state perceive us,” Rekdal says. “The state is composed of communities that are constantly changing.”

    Almost famous

    Always changing, too, is the poet, who scoffs at the idea that publishing her eighth book might make her almost famous on the U. campus. “They know we are simply bodies there to give them grades, and that is fine with me,” she says.

    If there is one biographical detail that undergraduate students are likely to have focused on, it’s that Rekdal and her husband, Sean Myles, a computer programmer, live in separate spaces in the same Avenues duplex. The only way to stay married, she jokes, for two people who often work at home.

    Next up, she says, is a poetry collection that reconsiders the metaphor of the nightingale, an important symbol in poetry through the ages. She explicates the symbol, while articulating how victims are silenced by sexual assault, in “Nightingale: A Gloss,” published this month in American Poetry Review. “Language is the first site of loss and our first defense against it,” is how she begins.

    Since the 2016 election, she has become something of an accidental activist, organizing Writers Resist readings and becoming the chairwoman of her neighborhood political district. Just this week, following Aimee Bender and a handful of other writers, Rekdal volunteered to read manuscripts for emerging writers who live in Republican states — if they would agree to call their elected officials to protest proposed legislation.

    “I’m not trying to make my students think politically the way I think,” she says. “I’m trying to get them to think.” And poetry students, she adds,” are studying an art form that has been talking about some of the deepest, hardest questions we’ve ever talked about.”

    Paisley Rekdal’s ‘The Broken County’
    Utah‘s poet laureate will read from her new nonfiction book, along with poet Dana Levin, at 7 p.m. Sept. 30 at The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City.
    More •
    For a schedule of more literary events that are part of the 20th annual Utah Humanities Book Festival around the state, visit utahhumanities.org.

    No freedom or hope for migrants in Hungary transit camps


    Belgrade, Serbia • When they set off from violence-plagued Afghanistan nearly two years ago, 17-year-old Hamad Ahmadi and his family believed Europe would give them a chance for a new life. They didn’t expect to be penned in a Hungarian migrant...

    Belgrade, Serbia • When they set off from violence-plagued Afghanistan nearly two years ago, 17-year-old Hamad Ahmadi and his family believed Europe would give them a chance for a new life. They didn’t expect to be penned in a Hungarian migrant center sealed with razor wire, where security was so tight that police felt the need to escort Ahmadi’s sister-in-law to the hospital to give birth.

    Ahmadi’s family is among the hundreds of migrants this year whose hopes of a new life were dashed by Hungary’s draconian anti-immigration rules, which have reduced the once-overflowing eastern migration route into Europe — which saw hundreds of thousands of migrants landing in Hungary to enter the European Union in 2015 — from a trickle to a drip.

    Still, Hungary’s anti-migrant rules remain tougher than ever, and its border is now a sealed fortress with two rows of razor-wired fencing, border transit zones for migrants, and heavy security.

    Ahmadi says the family had been optimistic despite having traveled for thousands of miles, waited ten months in a Serbian border camp, and endured the hardships that came with having two babies born in migrant centers in Serbia and Hungary this summer. They even kept their spirits up when Hungary held them in a heavily-guarded migrant barracks that the United Nations have described as “in effect detention centers.”

    But in the end, it all came to nothing. Hungarian authorities rejected their asylum applications and told them they must leave the country. They have no idea where they could go.

    “The (Hungarian) court said Afghanistan has problem, but you must go back,” Ahmadi said from neighboring Serbia, where his family is mulling their options. “After one year, they tell us you must go back?”

    “Where is that humanity of Europe?” he asked. “We don’t know.”

    Inside the transit zone on the border with Serbia, Ahmadi and other migrants could move only within a confined area and had to file a request should they want to visit a friend in another barrack — even for a short while.

    “There were too much police, night and day, 24 hours,” Ahmadi said.

    Hungary has faced strong international criticism for its treatment of asylum seekers. The U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi, recently said Hungary is displaying “a very clear intention” to curtail the access refugees have to protection in the country. He criticized the small number of refugees allowed to file asylum claims — five a day at each of two transit zones — as well as the “very low rate” of approvals.

    “Children, in particular, should not be confined in detention,” he warned. “Seeking asylum is not a crime.”

    Official data suggest Hungary’s harsh measures have succeeded in discouraging most of the migrants from seeking protection in the country, even as tens of thousands do arrive to Europe via the more dangerous Mediterranean Sea route or illegally through some other European country, such as Croatia or Romania.

    The massive flow of migrants also subsided after nations along the Balkan route closed their borders in March 2016 and the EU agreed with Turkey to stem the influx over the Aegean Sea toward Greece.

    This year, just 2,217 people sought asylum in Hungary, official data show, less than 10 percent of the 24,357 in 2016. Out of them, only 61 people were acknowledged as refugees, while 383 received the status of a subsidiary protected person.

    Germany took in the bulk of over a million asylum-seekers from 2015 to 2016, while countries like Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic or Slovakia have refused to accept them fueling east-west divisions in the bloc.

    Hungary’s right-wing Prime Minister Viktor Orban has repeatedly claimed he wants to protect Europe from the influx of mostly Muslim migrants. He told lawmakers on Monday that recent migrant flows were “merely a warmup,” and warned of “dramatic” dangers to Europe’s security and identity.

    Ahmadi said his family’s case was first rejected after just one month in Hungary but they were allowed to appeal. A government-appointed lawyer did not show up for the final court ruling which was delivered via Skype, he said.

    But he said that despite the lack of freedom, the family had been happy as long as there was hope.

    “We were happy when we were in that closed camp,” he said. “We were waiting ... but after that we (thought) will have something, we will have something.”

    Now, Ahmadi said, their faith in European solidarity has been shaken. Hungarian guards, he said, dislike migrants so much that they even wouldn’t let them play volleyball during the long summer days in the camp.

    “Most of the time they were taking our ball, our net,” he said. “They didn’t want us to be happy there.”

    Obama-era campus assault guidance scrapped, DeVos says rules were ‘unfairly skewed’


    Washington • The Trump administration on Friday scrapped Obama-era guidance on investigating campus sexual assault, replacing it with new interim instructions allowing universities to decide which standard of evidence to use when handling...

    Washington • The Trump administration on Friday scrapped Obama-era guidance on investigating campus sexual assault, replacing it with new interim instructions allowing universities to decide which standard of evidence to use when handling complaints.

    Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has said the Obama rules were unfairly skewed against the students accused of assault.

    “This interim guidance will help schools as they work to combat sexual misconduct and will treat all students fairly,” DeVos said in a statement.

    “Schools must continue to confront these horrific crimes and behaviors head-on. There will be no more sweeping them under the rug. But the process also must be fair and impartial, giving everyone more confidence in its outcomes,” she said.

    DeVos’ temporary guidance allows colleges the freedom to decide which standards of evidence they want to use when investigating complaints of sexual assault. Under Obama’s instructions from 2011 and 2014, colleges were told to use “the preponderance of the evidence” standards, while DeVos lets colleges choose between that standard and “the clear and convincing evidence standard,” which is harder to meet.

    The temporary guidance will be in place while the Education Department gathers comments and comes up with new rules.

    Labor Department doesn’t want a polygamous church to use child labor anymore

    Labor Department doesn’t want a polygamous church to use child labor anymore


    The U.S. Department of Labor is asking a judge to prohibit the polygamous Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and one of its former bishops from using underage workers. In a motion filed Thursday in federal court in Salt Lake City,...

    The U.S. Department of Labor is asking a judge to prohibit the polygamous Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and one of its former bishops from using underage workers.

    In a motion filed Thursday in federal court in Salt Lake City, the Labor Department said neither the FLDS’ corporate entity nor Lyle Jeffs, who once ran the day-to-day operations of the church, have responded to court filings and a default order should be entered.

    The Labor Department wants that order to prohibit the FLDS and Jeffs from violating labor laws in the future. It also wants a judge to determine the amount of back wages that should be paid to children who harvested pecans at a ranch near Hurricane from 2008 through 2012.

    In December 2012, CNN aired footage of FLDS children harvesting pecans at what was called the Southern Utah Pecan Ranch.

    The Labor Department has pursued the church, Jeffs and the FLDS-affiliated company contracted to pick the pecans, Paragon Contractors Corp., over the harvest. A judge has already ordered Paragon Contractors Corp. to repay $200,000 in back wages.

    Children, some of whom now are adults and have left the church, have testified they were required to harvest the pecans in bad weather and with few breaks. They were not paid for their work, they testified. The Labor Department says in its filing that 1,400 children and adults worked on the 2012 harvest alone.

    Jeffs, 57, on Wednesday pleaded guilty to one count of fraud and one count of failure to appear in court related to what prosecutors called a scheme to defraud the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, often referred to as food stamps. He faces three years to five years in prison when he is sentenced Dec. 13.

    Scorpions still pack a sting more than 50 years later


    Mention the Scorpions to casual music fans, and their mental inventory likely will have the German hard-rockers filed away as just another ’80s band.The thing is, the Scorpions were churning out anthemic riffs before that decade, and — as their...

    Mention the Scorpions to casual music fans, and their mental inventory likely will have the German hard-rockers filed away as just another ’80s band.

    The thing is, the Scorpions were churning out anthemic riffs before that decade, and — as their headlining appearance at Usana Amphitheatre in West Valley City this coming Tuesday illustrates — they have remained a popular force in the rock world longer after it.

    In fact, a few years ago, the Scorpions marked their 50-year anniversary as a band — a feat that not many of their ’80s contemporaries will ever match.

    “I mean, to put a five-zero on your poster for a tour, it’s kind of a scary thing to do. You go, ‘What?!’ ” singer Klaus Meine said in a phone interview with The Salt Lake Tribune. “But then, at the same time, 50 years being around for this band, it’s really something — at the end of the day, it makes you proud. Because so very few bands can achieve this. I think it’s a very unusual story, especially when you think this is a German band.”

    The vocalist likes to reflect on the Scorpions’ first tours of the United States, circa ’79, opening for the likes of AC/DC and Ted Nugent, Aerosmith and Van Halen, and how “we learned so much from the American way of life and the American rock ’n’ roll business, how it is to not only play a song, but to entertain your audience.”

    That component of emphasizing showmanship remains to this day, with Meine promising “cool production with huge LED walls and all that” at the Usana show.

    “But what it comes down to at the end of the day, it’s the music,” he added.

    Of course, with an oft-underrated catalog of more arena-rattling pop-metal hits than many might initially remember — “Rock You Like a Hurricane,” “No One Like You,” “Still Loving You,” “Wind of Change,” “Send Me an Angel,” “The Zoo,” “Big City Nights,” “Rhythm of Love,” “Loving You Sunday Morning,” “I Can’t Explain” — it’s not hard to sell audiences both old and new on that.

    “It’s a privilege after all these years to play in front of three generations and to reach the young rock fans with your music. When you play in front of these young kids, it doesn’t matter if you’re an ’80s band or a whatever band, you know? For them, the only thing that’s important is, ‘This band rocks. This is a band that delivers a real great show,’ ” Meine said. “They come with their friends and see a great rock show. And when they go home and go, ‘Wow, this was a fantastic evening,’ nobody thinks about those categories like being an ’80s band and all this — it doesn’t matter. It goes in circles. ‘It’s a great show, it’s a great evening, and I have a lot of fun to see this band even though they’re 50 years around.’ It doesn’t matter, if they’re great. And this is what we try to prove every night.”

    They’re still very much trying to prove just that, mostly onstage these days, but sometimes still in the studio.

    The band’s latest album, “Return to Forever,” was released in 2015. Meine said the Scorpions recently recorded some new songs, and while he doesn’t see another LP in their immediate future due to their schedule, he wouldn’t rule out releasing the songs as individual tracks.

    “It feels great to be back in this creative mood to write a new song, and let’s see what happens. I mean, we’re far away from recording a new album at this point, because into next year we do so much touring. But it’s fun, even if it’s just for a couple songs, you know?” he said. “There’s a lot of things in the loop, but no plans to block ourselves out from touring by going to the studio for two or three months or something. … If you ask me if it’s important, I think it’s still important — never lose this creative side of the whole thing. To go out on tour and present new songs, it’s always very important for a live band like the Scorpions.”

    He said the Scorpions’ show spans the decades, including everything from an early-’70s medley consisting of “Top of the Bill,” “Steamrock Fever,” “Speedy’s Coming” and “Catch Your Train,” to all those ’80s and early-’90s hits, to a few cuts from “Return to Forever,” such as “Eye of the Storm,” “Rock ’N’ Roll Band” and “Going Out with a Bang.”

    Beyond continuing to tour for a while, there’s nothing concrete in place.

    Even after more than half a century as a band, Meine figures the Scorpions still have some good years left. That said, he’s not quite willing to say the show will go on until it can’t anymore.

    “I don’t know! I hope not! But we’re not making any plans anymore whatsoever. Right now, we’re pretty much booked out, and we have offers from all around the world, which is quite amazing after all these years. But, like I said, this is a band that still delivers a great show out there, and as long as we can do it and as long as we enjoy ourselves, we might be out there. But I have no idea. I definitely don’t want to do it until … I don’t know. No, no, no! I just don’t want to think about it!” he said. “All I can say is, if you can see what I see when I go out onstage, if you would see that, who is not having fun doing what we do? We really still enjoy doing what we’re doing. We enjoy a great live show, and going out there and giving fans all we’ve got. And as long as we can deliver the goods, it seems to be all right. But no predictions into the future! I really don’t know! In a way, it’s like getting older these days, it’s like with every tour, you’re moving into unknown territory, so to speak.”

    Utah remains known territory for the band, at least. Though Meine admits “we haven’t been in Salt Lake for quite a while,” he noted that it “has been always a great place for us, because it’s a great rock crowd.

    “It’s all good. All I can say is thank you to Salt Lake City fans, to the fans in Utah, for supporting us for so many years,” he added. “We come back, looking very much forward, then we rock you like a hurricane again!”

    Scorpions
    With Megadeth
    When • Tuesday, 7 p.m.
    Where • Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 Upper Ridge Road, West Valley City
    Tickets • $35-$90; Smith’s Tix

    Prosecutors chime in on ex-Sheriff Joe Arpaio's pardon


    Phoenix • Prosecutors in former Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s criminal case say past court decisions back up their claim that President Donald Trump’s pardon nullifies the lawman’s conviction.But the U.S. Justice Department lawyers also said in a court...

    Phoenix • Prosecutors in former Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s criminal case say past court decisions back up their claim that President Donald Trump’s pardon nullifies the lawman’s conviction.

    But the U.S. Justice Department lawyers also said in a court filing Thursday that the pardon doesn’t require Judge Susan Bolton to alter, destroy or erase records in Arpaio’s criminal case.

    Arpaio’s attorneys are seeking to formally dismiss Arpaio’s criminal case and throw out a blistering 14-page ruling that explained the reasoning behind his guilty verdict. They say their requests are aimed at clearing Arpaio’s name and barring the ruling’s use in future court cases as an example of a prior bad act.

    The pardon spared the 85-year-old lawman a possible jail sentence for his July 31 conviction for intentionally disobeying a court order in a racial profiling case to stop his traffic patrols that targeted immigrants.

    The sheriff was accused of continuing the patrols for 17 months so that he could promote his immigration enforcement efforts in a bid to boost his successful 2012 re-election campaign. Arpaio, who endorsed Trump during the 2016 campaign, has acknowledged prolonging the patrols, but insisted his disobedience was not intentional.

    In the ruling that Arpaio wants thrown out, Bolton cited TV interviews and news releases in which the sheriff made comments about keeping up the patrols, even though he knew they were no longer allowed.

    Ten days ago, prosecutors told Bolton that the case should be dismissed and that all orders in the case should be annuled. The latest filing by prosecutors is a response to Bolton’s complaint that the Justice Department lawyers didn’t cite legal cases to back up their legal positions.

    Lawyers who defeated Arpaio in the racial profiling case have urged Bolton against throwing out the decision that explains the guilty verdict. They said the decision should remain intact to serve as a rebuke of the sheriff’s actions and as a deterrent to other politicians who might want to disobey a judge’s orders.

    Three legal advocacy groups also have asked Bolton to declare the pardon invalid or unconstitutional. They say letting the pardon stand would encourage government officials to flout future court orders on matters involving people’s constitutional rights.

    Since the pardon, Arpaio has said he did nothing wrong, criticized Bolton as biased and called the offense behind his conviction a “petty crime.” Arpaio, defeated last year in the same election that sent Trump to the White House, is now talking about getting back into politics.

    An Oct. 4 hearing has been scheduled to consider Arpaio’s request to dismiss the case and throw out the ruling that explained the verdict.

    Historian: At $35M, original printer's manuscript of Book of Mormon a bargain


    The original printer’s manuscript of the Book of Mormon now belongs to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and at $35 million, acquiring it was a bargain.At least, that’s what historian John Hajicek, of the mormonism.com website...

    The original printer’s manuscript of the Book of Mormon now belongs to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and at $35 million, acquiring it was a bargain.

    At least, that’s what historian John Hajicek, of the mormonism.com website contends, saying the church’s purchase of the manuscript from the Community of Christ fellowship finally gives the Utah-based faith its “founding document.”

    The Independence, Mo.-based Community of Christ, formerly known as the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, bought a collection including the document for $2,500 in 1903 — ironically, after the LDS Church declined to make a bid.

    Still, even at the $35 million price tag revealed Wednesday, Hajicek believes the LDS Church made a good deal. In fact, he compares the acquisition as the church’s equivalent of the U.S. government buying the first draft of the Constitution.

    “[The manuscript] is priceless,” Hajicek said, adding the purchase is the “biggest game-changer in Mormon history, since the year 1999, when President [Gordon B.] Hinckley made the announcement to rebuild the Nauvoo temple.”

    And the historian believes the manuscript could have fetched nearly three times as much as the church paid.

    “I thought the value of the manuscript exceeded $100 million,” he said. “The LDS Church got a good value.”

    While church officials declined Thursday to confirm the purchase price, Steven E. Snow, LDS Church historian and recorder, called the document both a spiritual and historic treasure.

    “We hold the Book of Mormon to be a sacred text like the Bible,” Snow said. “The printer’s manuscript is the earliest surviving copy of about 72 percent of the Book of Mormon text, as only about 28 percent of the earlier dictation copy survived decades of storage in a cornerstone in Nauvoo, Ill.”

    LDS Church officials praised the Community of Christ for its care of the document and in a statement expressed thanks to “generous donors who provided the means to acquire this treasure.”

    The entire printer’s manuscript was published by the LDS Church in 2015 as part of the faith’s Joseph Smith Papers Project. Specifically, the document is re-created in Volume Three of the “Revelations and Translations” series.

    As for the recently acquired original of the manuscript, Snow said plans were in the works to make it an exhibit at the Church History Library in downtown Salt Lake City “in the coming months.”

    One page of the manuscript was put on display Thursday. While most of the page is written in the hand of an unknown scribe, the last quarter was written by Hyrum Smith, the brother of LDS Church founder Joseph Smith. The page also features marks from original compositor John Gilbert and those that were made later by Oliver Cowdery and Joseph Smith.

    Mormons believe the Book of Mormon, first published in 1830 and the faith’s signature scripture, was translated by Joseph Smith from “reformed Egyptian” engravings on a set of golden plates unearthed from a hill in upstate New York, with the guidance of an angel.

    The work includes what Latter-day Saints believe to be the writings of prophets who lived in ancient America, as well as an account of a post-resurrection appearance on the continent by Jesus Christ.

    Tribune Director of Photography Jeremy Harmon contributed to this article.

    Lawrence Summers: The Cassidy-Graham vote is a chance for a Republican to be a hero

    Lawrence Summers: The Cassidy-Graham vote is a chance for a Republican to be a hero


    There is an opportunity for one or two Republican senators to be 21st century Profiles in Courage. A senator who stands up to his or her party and casts the decisive vote against the Cassidy-Graham health legislation will be seen by history as a...

    There is an opportunity for one or two Republican senators to be 21st century Profiles in Courage. A senator who stands up to his or her party and casts the decisive vote against the Cassidy-Graham health legislation will be seen by history as a hero.

    Cassidy-Graham is the cruelest and most misguided piece of consequential legislation proposed so far in the 21st century. It is far worse than the “repeal and replace” bills that Congress has so far voted down. Cassidy-Graham is much more dangerous than previous bills both because it goes further in eliminating critical parts of the Affordable Care Act and because it savages the pre-ACA Medicaid safety net.

    Start with what Cassidy-Graham does to the ACA, which established the landmark principle that health insurers could not discriminate against sick people or those with preexisting conditions. This idea was endorsed even by President Donald Trump and preserved in earlier legislation. Cassidy-Graham restores the ability of private insurers to exclude people with pre-existing conditions. It also knocks out the entirely reasonable provisions of the ACA requiring that insurance cover mental health, substance abuse treatment and maternity. And it eliminates the funding that went to expand coverage under the ACA through Medicaid expansion and tax credits, instead providing a block grant to states that is insufficient to replace it before ending altogether in 2026.

    Maybe even worse than what Cassidy-Graham does to the ACA is what it does to the underlying Medicaid program. Rather than maintain the federal guarantee to fund a share of Medicaid costs currently in place, the bill would convert the Medicaid program to a “per-capita cap” - with cuts that grow deeper over time.

    One consulting firm, Avalere, estimated that the cuts to Medicaid outside of the ACA would be over $1 trillion by 2036. That would inevitably require states to make deep cuts to coverage and services for the seniors in long-term care, people with disabilities, and families with children who use the program.

    I don’t understand how those supporting Cassidy-Graham live with themselves. People will die and they will be responsible. And what will follow ultimately after the backlash comes will make the ACA look like a libertarian dream. If ever there was a moment for a courageous Republican to step up, this is it.

    Lawrence Summers is a professor at and past president of Harvard University. He was treasury secretary from 1999 to 2001 and an economic adviser to President Barack Obama from 2009 through 2010.

    Prep football: Pick 6 — Six games to watch in Week 6


    American Fork at Lone Peak, 7 p.m.The Cavemen get a chance at revenge for their 66-19 loss to the Knights in the Class 5A state semifinals last year at Rice-Eccles Stadium. And it’s all about the passing game with the Cavemen. Senior QB Bronson Barron...

    American Fork at Lone Peak, 7 p.m.

    The Cavemen get a chance at revenge for their 66-19 loss to the Knights in the Class 5A state semifinals last year at Rice-Eccles Stadium. And it’s all about the passing game with the Cavemen. Senior QB Bronson Barron runs the offense, averaging 338.6 yards passing per game. He’s thrown 22 TDs and only seven INTs while completing 65 percent of his attempts. Chase Roberts leads the Cavemen with 37 catches for 652 yards and seven TDs. Farrell Dean is next with 31 grabs for 421 yards and another seven TDs. The Knights (4-1) aren’t afraid to throw it around, either. The senior trio of Cody Collins, Brigham Trowbridge and Kaden Clemens each has at least 320 yards receiving this season. But the Lone Peak rushing attack isn’t slacking off. Masen Wake leads the way with 467 yards, while Kobe Freeman has rushed for 433 yards. That balance makes slowing down Lone Peak difficult. One thing to keep an eye on is Lone Peak’s pass rush, led by Jonah Vimahi and his 4.5 sacks, against American Fork’s passing game. The Knights have won four of the last five meetings with American Fork, outscoring the Cavemen 186-112 over that span.

    TribPreps coverage • Eric Butler

    Olympus at Lehi, 7 p.m.

    Two of the top prep recruits will square off with an upper hand in the fight for the Region 6 crown at stake. Pioneers QB Cammon Cooper, who has committed to Washington State, will try to avoid the pass rush from defensive lineman Cameron Latu, an Alabama commit. The Titans held off West 45-42 in Week 5, thanks to 308 yards and four TDs through the air by QB Harrison Creer. The senior has been putting up impressive numbers this season. He’s thrown for 1,254 yards and 17 TDs to guide the Titans to a 3-2 start. Jake Hodgson led the Olympus defense with 17 total tackles in the West win. Lehi, after a record-setting offensive output against Alta in the opener, hasn’t been nearly as prolific. Cooper did throw for 362 yards and four scores in the 51-33 win over Maple Mountain in Week 5. Kade Moore continues to be Cooper’s main target. He’s hauled in 39 passes for 686 yards and seven TDs.

    TribPreps coverage • Maddie Lee

    Jordan at Brighton, 7 p.m.

    The Bengals suffered their first loss of the season in Week 5, a 42-28 setback against Skyline. Eagles QB Tommy McGrath threw for 413 yards against the Bengals defense in that one. And they’re going to face another skilled QB this week — the Beetdiggers’ dual threat, Crew Wakley. Brighton did get 166 yards and two scores on the ground from QB Alex Zettler, but it wasn’t nearly enough. And junior Evona Hall struggled to get going, finishing with 55 yards on 14 carries. The Bengals hope to bounce back to win their Region 7 opener. But Jordan is riding a three-game winning streak. The Beetdiggers defense limited Springville to 164 yards of offense in last week’s 33-7 win. Jordan has won the last two meetings between these two teams by a combined four points.

    Wasatch at Timpanogos, 7 p.m.

    How about those Timberwolves? Timpanogos is one of 10 undefeated teams left in Utah entering Week 6. What makes the start even more impressive is the Timberwolves only won five games over the last three years. The offense has featured balance so far. Three players have rushed for at least 160 yards this season, with sophomore Rory Ziegra leading the way with 393 on 45 carries. Junior QB Gabe Sweeten has added 260 yards on 48 totes. He’s also thrown for 1,069 yards and 14 scores. That offense will be a stiff test for the 2-2 Wasps. The defense is coming off a shutout win over Cottonwood in which the Wasps finished with eight tackles for loss, including three sacks. Senior Isaac Young has carried the load on the ground for the Wasps offense. He’s rushed 38 times for 222 yards and six TDs. Wasatch also boasts four receivers — Carson Myers, Grayson Wynne, Kaden Smith and Daymon Vargas — with at least 175 yards receiving apiece. It's the Region 8 opener for both teams.

    Dixie at Pine View, 7 p.m.

    The Flyers return to Utah competition after traveling to California and suffering a 24-14 setback against Madison (Calif.) last week. And they’ll have revenge on their mind after seeing their season end at the hands of Pine View in the Class 3AA state semifinals last year. Of course Dixie was without its quarterback, Jacob Barden, in that state semifinal, and that made a huge difference. Barden has thrown for 1,627 yards and 16 TDs this season, although he’s been limited to less than 200 yards in each of the last two games. The Panthers are coming off a 27-20 loss to Snow Canyon, a team that Dixie sneaked past in Week 4. Pine View QB Ryan Javines only completed 33 percent of his passes in the loss, although running back Jacob Mpungi did run for 194 yards. This could come down to which style wins the night — Mpungi and the Panthers running or Barden and the Flyers passing.

    TribPreps coverage • Justin Giles

    Sky View at Mountain Crest, 7 p.m.

    It’s just a couple of undefeated Cache Valley foes going at it for bragging rights in the new Region 12. The Bobcats’ defense continues to be stingy, allowing 12.8 points per game. Sky View took down Bear River 27-3 to open region play last week. If the Bobcats can take care of the Mustangs this week, they will position themselves as the favorites for the region title. Mountain Crest is no pushover, but it will have to reverse a trend. The Bobcats have won the last four meetings between the programs by a combined score of 133-43. The Mustangs are led by QB Brady Hall, who has thrown for 1,274 yards and 14 scores, while running for 278 yards and another six TDs. Senior Nicholas Nethercott has hauled in eight of those TD passes and is averaging 116.8 yards receiving per game.

    Kim Jong Un fires off insults at Trump and hints at weapons test


    Seoul, South Korea • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un lobbed a string of insults at President Donald Trump on Friday, calling him a “mentally deranged U.S. dotard” and hinting at a frightening new weapon test.It was the first time for a North Korean...

    Seoul, South Korea • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un lobbed a string of insults at President Donald Trump on Friday, calling him a “mentally deranged U.S. dotard” and hinting at a frightening new weapon test.

    It was the first time for a North Korean leader to issue such a direct statement against a U.S. president, dramatically escalating the war of words between the former wartime foes and raising the international nuclear standoff to a new level.

    Trump responded by tweeting that Kim is “obviously a madman who doesn’t mind starving or killing his people.”

    In a lengthy statement carried by state media, Kim said Trump would “pay dearly” for his recent threat to destroy North Korea. He also called Trump “deranged” and “a rogue and a gangster fond of playing with fire.”

    Kim Jong Un of North Korea, who is obviously a madman who doesn't mind starving or killing his people, will be tested like never before!

    — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 22, 2017

    Kim said his country will consider the “highest level of hard-line countermeasure in history,” a possible indication of more powerful weapons tests on the horizon, but didn’t elaborate.

    His foreign minister, asked on a visit to New York to attend the U.N. General Assembly what the countermeasure would be, said his country may test a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean.

    “I think it could be the most powerful detonation of an H-bomb in the Pacific,” Ri Yong Ho said, according to South Korean TV. “We have no idea about what actions could be taken as it will be ordered by leader Kim Jong Un.”

    Kim’s statement was unusual because it was written in the first person. North Korean state TV later showed a solemn-looking Kim, dressed in a gray Mao-style suit, reading the statement. South Korea’s government said it was the first direct address to the world by any North Korean leader.

    Some analysts saw a clear sign that North Korea will ramp up its already brisk pace of weapons testing, which has included missiles meant to target U.S. forces throughout Asia and on the U.S. mainland.

    An H-bomb test in the Pacific, if realized, would be considered a major provocation by Washington and its allies. North Korea has conducted six nuclear test explosions since 2006, all at its northeastern underground test site.

    Japanese Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera noted a Pacific test could mean a nuclear-armed missile flying over Japan. He said North Korea might conduct an H-bomb test with a medium-range or intercontinental ballistic missile, given its recent advances in missile and nuclear weapons development.

    “We cannot deny the possibility it may fly over our country,” he said.

    Vipin Narang, a nuclear strategy expert at MIT, said such a test could pose a danger to shipping and aircraft, even if North Korea declares a keep-out zone.

    “And if the test doesn’t go according to plan, you could have population at risk, too,” he said. “We are talking about putting a live nuclear warhead on a missile that has been tested only a handful of times. It is truly terrifying if something goes wrong.”

    North Korea was slapped with new, stiffer sanctions by the United Nations after its sixth and most power nuclear test on Sept. 3. In recent months, it has also launched a pair of still-developmental ICBMs it said were capable of striking the continental United States and two intermediate-range missiles that soared over Japanese territory.

    North Korea says it needs to have a nuclear deterrent because the United States intends to invade it. Analysts say the North is likely to soon achieve its objective of possessing nuclear missiles capable of reaching any part of the U.S. homeland.

    Kim’s statement was in response to Trump’s combative speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday in which he mocked Kim as “Rocket Man” on a “suicide mission” and said that if “forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.”

    Kim said Trump’s remarks “have convinced me, rather than frightening or stopping me, that the path I chose is correct and that it is the one I have to follow to the last.” He also said he would “tame the mentally deranged U.S. dotard with fire.”

    Hours before Kim’s statement, Trump announced stiffer new sanctions on North Korea as he met his South Korean and Japanese counterparts in New York.

    “North Korea’s nuclear weapons and missile development is a grave threat to peace and security in our world and it is unacceptable that others financially support this criminal, rogue regime,” Trump said as he joined South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe for lunch.

    Trump’s executive order expanded the Treasury Department’s ability to target anyone conducting significant trade in goods, services or technology with North Korea, and to ban them from interacting with the U.S. financial system.

    Trump also praised China for what he called an instruction to its banks to cut off business with North Korea. But a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman said Trump’s announcement was “not consistent with the facts,” though he gave no indication what steps China might be taking.

    “In principle, China has always implemented the U.N. Security Council’s resolutions in their entirety and fulfilled our due responsibility,” Lu Kang, the Chinese spokesman, told a regular briefing.

    China, North Korea’s largest trading partner and last major diplomatic ally, has cut off imports of coal, iron ore, seafood and other goods from North Korea in line with U.N. sanctions.

    The South Korean government, which has sought a dialogue with North Korea, called Kim’s statement a “reckless provocation” that would deepen the North’s international isolation and lead to its demise.

    Kragthorpe: Ute basketball recruiting is riding momentum, creating a good outlook for Larry Krystkowiak's program


    In the past six months, my analysis of the University of Utah’s basketball recruiting has revolved around the players the Ute staff barely missed signing and those who came to the school and subsequently left.I may have given coach Larry Krystkowiak...

    In the past six months, my analysis of the University of Utah’s basketball recruiting has revolved around the players the Ute staff barely missed signing and those who came to the school and subsequently left.

    I may have given coach Larry Krystkowiak and his staff too much credit for coming close to landing the likes of Arizona’s Lauri Markannen and Gonzaga’s Zach Collins and Killian Tillie. I may have overly criticized them for failing to retain the nine players who have transferred in the past two years. The circumstances vary in each athlete’s case, although I’ll stick with the belief that Utah’s evaluations and expectations should have been more thorough.

    In any case, with the variable that nobody knows for sure how these incoming athletes’ careers will play out, the Ute coaches deserve praise for what they’re doing with the 2018 recruiting class. They have commitments from a junior college guard and four high school players — including guard Devante Doutrive, who graduated this year and will redshirt in 2017-18. The others plan to sign in November and arrive next year.

    The momentum may have started with a 2019 high school graduate. The early August commitment of Olympus point guard Rylan Jones, a son of Utah director of basketball operations Chris Jones, logically played a part in the others’ pledges. He’s the kind of player other guys want to join.

    The other commitments:

    • Charles Jones II, a 6-foot-2 guard from the College of Southern Idaho

    • Naseem Gaskin, a 6-3 guard from Bishop O’Dowd High School in Oakland, Calif.

    • Devante Doutrive, a 6-5 guard from Birmingham High School in Van Nuys, Calif.

    • Timmy Allen, a 6-5 wing from Red Mountain High School in Mesa, Ariz.

    • Riley Battin, a 6-10 forward from Oak Park (Calif.) High School.

    Jones, Doutrive, Allen and Battin are four-star recruits. Exactly how they will blend into the program and create roles for themselves will be interesting to see, but I know this: Fans who closely follow Ute basketball recruiting are revved up, after being disappointed in recent years. Krystkowiak, whose contract runs through 2023, is showing signs of building a strong program well into the next decade.

    And this recruiting class undoubtedly will ease some of the disappointment of last season — and the coming season.

    With the loss of forward Kyle Kuzma as a first-round pick of the Los Angeles Lakers, the Utes are unlikely to make the NCAA Tournament in 2018, after settling for the NIT last year. But nobody can question the recruiting efforts of Krystkowiak and his staff lately – and even if they had landed Markkanen or Collins, those guys are already in the NBA.


    Catherine Rampell: Republicans' brave new strategy for fixing health care: Make somebody else do it


    Republicans have unveiled their brave new strategy for fixing the U.S. health care system: Make someone else deal with it.Of all the god-awful Obamacare-repeal-and-replace plans that Republicans have proposed, Cassidy-Graham might be the god-awfulest....

    Republicans have unveiled their brave new strategy for fixing the U.S. health care system: Make someone else deal with it.

    Of all the god-awful Obamacare-repeal-and-replace plans that Republicans have proposed, Cassidy-Graham might be the god-awfulest. It’s definitely the most cowardly. Republicans spent nine months fighting over how to repeal Obamacare without shafting the poor and enraging voters, and they failed.

    So instead they’re passing the buck.

    Here’s how the bill, named for Republican Sens. Bill Cassidy (La.) and Lindsey Graham (S.C.), works.

    It would eliminate the Obamacare individual market subsidies, which help low- and middle-income people buy insurance. It would also repeal Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion money. After an enormous across-the-board cut to federal health spending, Congress would give each state a block grant.

    Every state would then have to create its own entirely new health insurance program, from scratch, by 2020.

    Then, in 2027, the block-grant funding ends entirely.

    Because hey, if Congress, with so many experts and resources at its disposal, can’t figure it out, then surely some part-time state lawmakers can. All our health-care problems will be solved once we unleash the brain trust that is the Kansas legislature.

    All this means fewer people would be insured, since states will be forced to do less with less. We don’t yet have an estimate for how many Americans would lose coverage, though; the Senate plans to vote on the bill next week, conveniently before the Congressional Budget Office has time to put together a full score.

    An increase in uninsured rates isn’t the only easily foreseeable problem with this proposal. Premium prices are likely to spike, too.

    That’s because Cassidy-Graham eliminates the Obamacare requirement that everyone have health insurance. It also doesn’t replace this mandate with anything to incentivize healthy people to get coverage.

    As a result, the relatively sick will buy insurance at higher rates than the relatively healthy, pushing up premiums and thereby driving more relatively healthy people out of insurance markets, further driving up premiums, and so on. The dreaded “death spiral,” in other words.

    To hold premiums down, states would probably be tempted to scale back benefit requirements and encourage the sale of cheap but nearly worthless insurance plans. These are sometimes called “mini-med” or “buffalo policies,” so nicknamed because they pretty much pay off only if you get run over by a herd of buffalo.

    Regrettably, Cassidy-Graham empowers states to shred these consumer safeguards: Unlike Obamacare, the proposal does not protect people with pre-existing conditions; has no mandatory coverage of cancer, prescription drugs, maternity care or other “essential health benefits”; and does not prohibit lifetime benefit caps.

    “States would be given an enormous amount of money with no strings attached,” says Larry Levitt, senior vice president at the Kaiser Family Foundation.

    “No strings attached” is a bit of an understatement. Cassidy-Graham doesn’t even require states to devote a single dollar of their block grants to insuring poor people. In fact, states could just use the grants to substitute for existing programs, Levitt says, allowing state funds to be directed to other purposes.

    To hear Republican senators tell it, of course, this isn’t about forcing governors to make decisions that Congress is too gutless to make itself.

    No. It’s about federalism!

    States, those laboratories of democracy, are better suited to craft insurance policies -- which are, at their core, boring financial contracts -- narrowly tailored to their own unique state needs.

    Which is nonsense.

    What, people in Tennessee don’t get cancer? People in Hawaii don’t give birth or have heart attacks? Adverse selection isn’t a problem in Alaska?

    Generally speaking, diseases and laws of economics don’t recognize state borders.

    What’s more, under Obamacare, states already have the flexibility to experiment and innovate. Under current law, states can apply for waivers if they wish to adapt their regulations to local conditions.

    But the Affordable Care Act says they can do so only if they adhere to basic consumer protections and a minimum level of quality. Cassidy-Graham includes vague language about how states should offer “adequate and affordable health insurance coverage for individuals with pre-existing conditions,” but there’s zero enforcement mechanism to guarantee they do so.

    It’s no wonder that nearly every major stakeholder, from the American Medical Association to the March of Dimes, has come out against this lily-livered bill. Cassidy-Graham is an abdication not only of any responsibility to the poor and the sick but also of congressional leadership more generally.

    When it comes down to it, Senate Republicans aren’t trying to improve the health-care system. They’re trying to duck responsibility when they make it worse.

    Behind the Headlines: Interior wants to shrink Bears Ears, lawmakers consider eliminating the food tax and state school board gets an earful about optional courses


    Welcome to this week’s episode of “Behind the Headlines,” where we speak to Salt Lake Tribune reporters about the biggest news of the week. After a review of national monument sizes around the country, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s...

    Welcome to this week’s episode of “Behind the Headlines,” where we speak to Salt Lake Tribune reporters about the biggest news of the week.

    After a review of national monument sizes around the country, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s recommendation to President Donald Trump includes shrinking Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante. Utah lawmakers discuss eliminating sales tax on food during a special session of the Legislature. And the Utah Board of Education hears from critics and proponents of the decision to make health, physical education, career awareness and arts courses optional for middle school students.

    At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporters Benjamin Wood, Taylor Anderson and Brian Maffly, as well as columnist Robert Gehrke, join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

    Each Friday morning, stream “Behind the Headlines” online at kcpw.org or tune in to KCPW 88.3 FM or Utah Public Radio for the broadcast.

    In Salt Lake City speech, Michelle Obama preaches hope as she cringes at climate of fear


    When asked how she views the world “right now,” former first lady Michelle Obama had less of an answer and more of a gut reaction.She cringed and quietly groaned.“I don’t have much of a poker voice,” Obama said with a laugh.Though she didn’t...

    When asked how she views the world “right now,” former first lady Michelle Obama had less of an answer and more of a gut reaction.

    She cringed and quietly groaned.

    “I don’t have much of a poker voice,” Obama said with a laugh.

    Though she didn’t mention President Donald Trump by name — a leader who’s spent much of his early tenure trying to erase the legacy of her husband, former President Barack Obama — the former first lady did tell a Salt Lake City audience Thursday that “we are looking at two different administrations.”

    One, she said, was built on hope. The other is being led with fear.

    “It isn’t just us first,” she said, a reference to Trump’s “America First” agenda. “We live in a big country and a big world. … You can’t just want to help someone in a hurricane and not make sure they can go to the doctor when they’re sick.”

    Her remarks, part of an hourlong moderated conversation, came on the last of a three-day tech conference hosted by Pluralsight, a Utah-based company. More than 1,000 attendees, mostly IT employees, raptly watched as she spoke, clapping loudly and nodding in agreement.

    One woman in the audience suggested with a shout that Obama run for president.

    “Oh no! That’s still shocking. Like what? Are you kidding me? No,” Obama said. “No, running for office is nowhere on the radar screen but continuing in public service is something I will do for the rest of my life.”

    And while she acknowledged “things are tough right now” and suggested “we’re being tested,” Obama professed that she “continues to be hopeful” that the political climate will improve.

    One avenue with potential, she believes, is technology. Echoing comments she made in June at Apple’s annual developer conference, Obama urged computing companies to invest in and hire more women (most major tech businesses, including Google, Facebook and Microsoft, have workforces where fewer than 20 percent of the technical employees are female, according to annual “diversity reports”).

    Changing that composition, Obama said, will take encouraging girls at a young age to study science and math. It will mean bridging “the technology gap” that persists in low-income districts. It requires revisions to the public-school system. And it warrants forming hiring committees with more women and people of color.

    “You can’t just say you want to fix the problems, you have to mean it,” Obama said. “If a bunch of white guys are sitting around the table trying to get more women involved, they’re not going to come up with the answer.”

    For Utah’s Silicon Slopes and elsewhere, she added, a behavioral change in the office environment at IT corporations will need to accompany that shift.

    “You can’t hire women and then they come in and they’re working for chimps. No offense — you guys aren’t all chimps,” Obama said to laughs from the crowd. “I call my husband a chimp sometimes, especially when he’s watching the Sports Center. I’m like ‘Come on. Look at you. You’re an animal.’”

    When the moderator, Pluralsight CEO Aaron Skonnard, suggested it isn’t so hard to include more women in the tech community, she responded: “Duh!”

    As first lady, Obama focused on improving education, including initiatives for art classes and healthier lunches. But first moving into the White House, she joked Thursday, was a giant trust fall.

    “It’s like being shot out of a cannon while drinking from a fire hydrant blind,” she said. “You have to tell the White House what kind of toilet paper you like. You don’t know where your forks are.”

    The biggest challenge, Obama added, was raising two young daughters, Sasha and Malia, “under the glare of one of the harshest and biggest lights.” She and Barack Obama would go to parent teacher conferences with a 20-car presidential motorcade. They’d be asked to take photos in the stands at school sporting events. And they’d require Secret Service protection at proms and first dates.

    “They take precedent,” she said of the girls with an emphasis that seemed like a subtle jab at Trump mistakenly writing “unpresidented” in a tweet after his 2016 election.

    Still, it was with some relief that Obama reflected on her eight years in Washington. “Freedom! I’m out,” she said with a smile.

    Obama has visited Utah before in July 2011 to fundraise for her husband’s second presidential campaign. On this trip she pledged to partner with Pluralsight and return to the state to build on the company’s commitments to expand education through technology.

    “What Barack and I don’t want to be is the people that won’t go away,” she said, finishing the event with a standing ovation. “We want to help the next generation come up and take our seats.”

    Utah documentary tells intimate, gritty story of opiate crisis

    Utah documentary tells intimate, gritty story of opiate crisis


    In a dark bedroom, Maddy is tying off her arm, getting ready to shoot heroin with her girlfriend, Page. Through the camera’s eye, we watch these intimate, gritty scenes in Jenny Mackenzie’s new documentary “Dying in Vein: The Opiate...

    In a dark bedroom, Maddy is tying off her arm, getting ready to shoot heroin with her girlfriend, Page. Through the camera’s eye, we watch these intimate, gritty scenes in Jenny Mackenzie’s new documentary “Dying in Vein: The Opiate Generation.”

    During the year the Utah filmmaker was following Maddy and Page, the 20-something women were under the care of counselors in “harm reduction” drug treatment programs and had agreed to not increase the amount of drugs they were using.

    Maddy had been cut off financially by her parents, but wasn’t ready to enter a rehab program. “I always knew where the Naloxone was,” the filmmaker said of the drug used to treat narcotic overdoses in emergencies. “They never had to use it on each other while I was filming.”

    “They were being responsible heroin users, if that were possible,” added Mackenzie, underscoring the ethical obligation she felt to include the cinéma vérité drug scenes in the documentary as a way to underscore “the raw and real story of heroin addiction.”

    “I feel as though there’s too much that happens behind closed doors,” the filmmaker said. “We believe it’s happening to ‘those’ people, but it’s really happening to all of us. Until we really look and understand the suffering that is happening, we won’t be able to come together and address the change that needs to happen to compassionately address this problem.”

    Mackenzie’s film, which is available for viewing on Hulu and other streaming sites, will be screened by the Utah Film Center at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Salt Lake City’s Downtown Library. In October, Utah Public Radio is sponsoring screenings in Logan, Ogden, Price, Vernal and Moab, part of the filmmaker’s push to show the film in 100 communities before Jan. 1.

    “Dying in Vein” unfolds intensely personal stories of young Utahns caught in various stages of drug addiction and recovery, illuminating local issues as a microcosm of the national drug crisis. “It shows how deep down a rabbit hole you can go on this drug, losing your basic humanity, core and moral compass,” said Geralyn White Dreyfous, the film’s executive producer. “It’s scary how fast it can happen.”

    More unusual is how the film outlines the “pain pill-to-heroin” pipeline and how that problem shows up in hospital emergency rooms. Patients seek pills to relieve their pain, while doctors are under pressure to receive good patient reviews. All of that can exacerbate pain pill addictions, physicians say. (As a voice of support for the film, the Utah Emergency Physicians association voted to donate some $30,000 in finishing funds after seeing an early cut of the film.)

    The documentary also focuses on Jennifer Plumb, an ER physician who launched Utah Naloxone, a nonprofit that has distributed more than 5,000 free rescue kits to addicts. In the documentary, Plumb tells the story of her inspiration: the memory of the heroin overdose of her brother, Andy, who died in a Salt Lake City basement when he was 22.

    The story of creating “Dying in Vein” begins with the tragic overdose in February 2014 of Chase Saxton, whose death sent shock waves through the close-knit alumni of the Rowland Hall community.

    Mackenzie’s daughter, who had known Chase, prompted her mother to contact his family. They invited her to shoot his funeral services, where she met one of his close friends, Matt Walje, a former addict now working as a drug counselor.

    The subject had personal echoes for Mackenzie. Several years earlier, her daughter had fallen into prescription-drug misuse while treating high-school soccer injuries. “We got lucky,” Mackenzie said. “I caught her in the nick of time. She wanted to get help, we could afford good treatment, and she made it to the other side.”

    But that personal stake inspired the filmmaker, a former social worker, to continue to pursue the story. As she sought funding for the documentary, Mackenzie posted short trailers on the internet, which prompted an extraordinary email.

    Maddy, then living in California, was still using drugs, but invited the filmmaker to tell her story. “I never want to see anyone else go through this horrible experience,” she wrote.

    Maddy, now 25, has been clean for 2 ½ years. Page, now 28, relapsed, but filmmakers helped enroll her successfully in an another rehab program. Both now work as drug treatment counselors. “Luckily for us, Maddy came out on the other side,” Dreyfous said. “We didn’t know that at the time.”

    The harsh realities of our country’s opiate addiction problem can make the film difficult to watch, Dreyfous said, adding: “It’s also really hard to like addicts when they are addicts.”

    Dying in Vein”
    Utah filmmaker Jenny Mackenzie‘s documentary will be screened by the Utah Film Center at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Salt Lake City Main Library, 200 E. 400 South. Free. For details, visit utahfilmcenter.org/event/dying-in-vein.
    Other screenings • 6 p.m. Oct. 3 in Moab; 6 p.m. Oct. 4 in Price; 6 p.m. Oct. 5 in Vernal; Oct. 6 and 7, Logan; and Oct. 18 in Ogden.
    Schedule • To schedule a screening, contact Jorden Hackney at 801-971-9172.

    Scott D. Pierce: Oh no! Maybe CBS’ new ‘Star Trek’ stinks


    Well, fellow Trekkers, I was planning a big cover story about “Star Trek: Discovery” this weekend, along with a review of the new series.That’s not going to happen. Because CBS won’t screen the show for critics.There are two possible explanations...

    Well, fellow Trekkers, I was planning a big cover story about “Star Trek: Discovery” this weekend, along with a review of the new series.

    That’s not going to happen. Because CBS won’t screen the show for critics.

    There are two possible explanations for this. The first is that “Star Trek: Discovery” sucks.

    I really hope that’s not true, because I’ve been looking forward to this since it was announced. For that matter, pretty much since the most recent “Star Trek” went off the air more than 12 years ago.

    But in the 27 years I’ve been a TV critic, I cannot recall a single time when something withheld from us turned out to be good. It’s like when movie studios don’t screen crummy flicks for critics — they’re hoping to sell a few tickets before the reviews are written.

    I fear that’s the case with “Discovery.” After all, it has already been through production turmoil (including changing showrunners) and was delayed from January to May to September. And fans are ticked they’ll have to pay a fee to see “Discovery” on CBS All Access, so it could use all the good press it can get. Good press it would get from positive reviews.

    (The pilot airs Sunday at 7 p.m. on CBS/Ch. 2; that and all other episodes will be streaming only on CBS All Access.)

    CBS had screenings in New York and Los Angeles for a few critics, but their reviews are embargoed until after it airs on Sunday. Yes, HBO did that with Season 6 of “Game of Thrones” and Showtime did that with Season 3 of “Twin Peaks,” but for a major TV outlet to withhold a series premiere is unprecedented.

    It doesn’t inspire optimism about the quality of “Discovery.”

    The second possible explanation is that this is to prevent spoilers. And CBS claims this is a matter of security. But I get screeners with instructions telling me not to give away spoilers all the time.

    Critics have seen all six new fall shows on the CBS broadcast network, as well as the two new series on The CW, which CBS operates. And dozens of other shows.

    Yes, the first four episodes of Season 5 of “Game of Thrones” were leaked online in 2015, and there were widespread reports that it was traced to screeners sent to critics. At the time, I was the president of the Television Critics Association; I contacted HBO, asked who the culprit was and stated flatly that I would kick him/her out of TCA.

    Turns out HBO got scammed by a fraud. Critics weren’t the problem.

    Yes, I’d like to see “Discovery” because I’m not just a critic, I’m a fan. But as a fan, I can wait.

    As a critic, I can’t do my job because CBS won’t let me. I could write a story with the interviews I did with the cast and producers, but what’s the point? They all told me it’s great — as you’d expect.

    Maybe it is. Maybe this is just a case of CBS completely botching the rollout.

    Let’s hope. We’ll find out on Sunday.

    Howard Stephenson: Protecting taxpayers from out-of-control medication costs


    As the debate over repeal and replace of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), better known as Obamacare, winds its way through the halls of Congress, one thing is clear: Health care costs are out of control and something must be done to rein them in.  While...

    As the debate over repeal and replace of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), better known as Obamacare, winds its way through the halls of Congress, one thing is clear: Health care costs are out of control and something must be done to rein them in.  

    While untangling the regulations of the ACA and freeing up market competition among health plans will go a long way towards reducing the cost burden of health care for Americans, doing so is merely one part of the health care system in need of increased market forces. Certain anti-competitive practices in the pharmaceutical space, for example, are preventing generic drug competition and driving up the costs of medication, costing taxpayers and patients billions of dollars.

    Rising prescription drug prices continue to strain the finances of hundreds of thousands of Utahns who rely on a steady and affordable supply of medication. Since 2008, the average cost of a branded drug has increased nearly 208 percent while their generic equivalents have decreased nearly 74 percent.

    Generic drugs are 89 percent of the prescriptions dispensed in the U.S. but only account for 26 percent of drug costs. In 2016 alone, nationwide Medicare and Medicaid savings from generic drug purchases totaled almost $115 billion, compared to buying the brand name equivalent, including more than $1.9 billion in direct savings to Utah’s taxpayers, including on overburdened Medicare and Medicaid programs.

    Despite the cost savings that generic drugs offer over brand name drugs, the brand name drug manufacturers deserve our support — to a point. Indeed, there is no question that pharmaceutical companies that spend billions of dollars developing these drugs need a period when their inventions are protected so they can recover research and development costs and turn a reasonable profit. The U.S. Constitution even grants Congress the power to promote the progress of science by securing limited times to inventors the exclusive right to their discoveries. But limited time, not perpetual time, is the key concept concerning the public’s general interest and well-being.

    Unfortunately, some branded drug manufacturers are exploiting a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) patient safety program referred to as Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) to block the entry of generic competitors into the market beyond the 14-year patent period, effectively granting themselves a monopoly beyond their patent period and subverting free market forces.

    The result is more than $5.4 billion in lost annual savings from generics competition that should have been passed on to taxpayers and consumers.

    One of the main ways that REMS abuses occur is through restricted distribution networks designed to protect certain consumers from dangerous medications. Some brand name drug manufacturers, however, have started to use these networks to prevent generic manufacturers from purchasing samples of their drug for the purposes of equivalency testing.

    As more and more branded manufacturers misuse REMS programs to delay generic entry, it has become clear to our leaders in Washington that something must be done. 

    The Creating and Restoring Access to Equivalent Samples Act of 2017 or the CREATES Act, introduced by a bipartisan group of senators, including Utah Sen. Mike Lee, addresses the most common REMS abuses while maintaining patient safety and intellectual property protections.

    REMS abuses are prohibited by statute, but currently no mechanism exists to enforce these rules. Instead of introducing more regulation and government bureaucracy, the CREATES Act provides a pathway to combat these anticompetitive behaviors, ultimately discouraging the practice. The bill provides enforcement mechanisms of existing law by providing a narrowly tailored legal pathway to enable generic manufacturers to seek drug samples through court action if faced with excessive delays.

    The alternative solution is new and potentially over broad FDA regulation that would raise costs on bad firms and innocent actors alike. We should instead strive to keep government out of the business of business and the CREATES Act does just that.

    The failures of the ACA have shown us that excessive government regulation in healthcare results in higher costs and less coverage. The good news is that there is a way to curb the misuse of REMS programs and increase generic drug competition without more government regulation or bureaucracy. The CREATES Act provides a clear pathway to confront what Sen. Lee described as “Two of the biggest problems faced by American consumer — high drug prices and burdensome regulation.” The result will be significant savings to patients and taxpayers through increased free market competition.

    Howard Stephenson is a Utah state senator from District 11 in southern Salt Lake County

    ‘I’m afraid there are going to be passing bullets’: Frustrated Kearns community discusses escalating gang violence

    ‘I’m afraid there are going to be passing bullets’: Frustrated Kearns community discusses escalating gang violence


    Kearns • Christina Robles has called the police three times in the past 10 days to report gunshots.In the case of two of those calls, no one was injured. But on Tuesday, a drive-by shooting at her neighbor’s house and subsequent car crash left two...

    Kearns • Christina Robles has called the police three times in the past 10 days to report gunshots.

    In the case of two of those calls, no one was injured. But on Tuesday, a drive-by shooting at her neighbor’s house and subsequent car crash left two people dead.

    “My son here is hiding under his bed,” the mother of three said. “I can’t even put my daughter to sleep in her bedroom because she sleeps at the front of the house and I’m afraid there are going to be passing bullets.”

    Tuesday marked the third day in a row that gunshots had been fired in the community.

    As police officers investigated possible ties between the shootings, a frustrated Kearns community gathered Thursday night to discuss escalating gang violence that led to the deaths of two of their neighbors.

    Council members on Sunday had decided to call the meeting after alleged gang members shot a 17-year-old in the legs as he and his friends walked along 6200 South.

    On Monday and Tuesday, alleged gang members shot at Robles’ neighbor’s house. Although no one was injured or arrested Monday, police arrested four male suspects late Tuesday after they fled the scene in a blue pickup truck and smashed into a passing car, killing its occupants, Lloyd Everett Pace and Tami Lynn Woodard, both of Kearns.

    Police initially believed the shootings were connected, but according to Unified police Lt. Brian Lohrke, officers have since determined their only ties are that they were all gang-related.  

    The suspects — 24-year-old Jose Luis Munoz-Lugo, Argenis Daniel Ramirez-Saedt, 19, and Rosalio Alvarez, 19, and a 17-year-old — were booked on suspicion of two counts each of first-degree felony murder, and multiple counts of discharging firearms toward a person. The adults being held in the Salt Lake County jail without bail, while the minor is in juvenile detention.

    Some community members expressed frustration that the suspects arrested after Tuesday’s shooting had been on the street at all.

    Jenny Swift said she didn’t understand why the deaths couldn’t have been prevented, saying that the truck had been stolen and was on the police department’s radar.

    “Our goal is to prevent crime before it happens,” Salt Lake County Sheriff Rosie Rivera said. “However, sometimes when a crime occurs, we have to have an investigation.”

    Law enforcement has to be careful identifying who is and isn’t in a gang, Rivera said. “Just because somebody wears a specific color does not mean they are a gang member.”

    The concern of false accusations was echoed by several community members, including Robles.

    She has never taught her children to be afraid of police, but she’s concerned her 17-year-old son — a senior at Kearns High School “with an afro out to here” — might be profiled.

    Robles would like to see more officers building relationships in the community so children feel like they have allies as they grow up, she said.

    Her 10-year-old’s football coach, who also is a police officer in the metro gang unit, has done that, she said. In the past seven years, he has built a relationship with her son and other boys.

    “That’s what I want to see from other officers,” Robles said.

    She’d also like to see more public forums and other places where she and her neighbors can interact with police officers so that teenagers’ only experiences with cops aren’t bad ones. 

    “I don’t want my children to be afraid of the gunshots,” she said, “Or the police that are there to protect them.”

    Prep football: Top-ranked Corner Canyon blows out No. 2 Timpview


    Draper • Timpview had the pedigree, but Corner Canyon had the No. 1 ranking when the second-ranked Thunderbirds came calling Thursday night.While the cold, rainy conditions left many scampering for their vehicles early, everything was just fine for the...

    Draper • Timpview had the pedigree, but Corner Canyon had the No. 1 ranking when the second-ranked Thunderbirds came calling Thursday night.

    While the cold, rainy conditions left many scampering for their vehicles early, everything was just fine for the host Chargers.

    Corner Canyon gradually pulled away and eventually achieved the 35-point mercy rule, which came with a running clock in the fourth quarter, to make an early region statement against the perennial state contenders in a surprising 44-7 blowout.

    “This victory means everything to us. It’s homecoming and the toughest game we’ve had so far,” said Chargers wideout Colton Lawson, who had 100 yards receiving. “We knew they were going to bring their all because they wanted revenge for last year because we beat ’em last year.”

    Corner Canyon (5-0, 1-0 in Region 7) got on the scoreboard on an 18-yard touchdown pass from Zach Wilson to Lawson with 1 minute, 32 seconds left in the first quarter to cap a 7-play, 56-yard drive.

    The second touchdown came before the ink was dry on the last one. Senior defensive back Dalton Hagen stepped in front of a Timpview (3-2, 0-1) pass and ran his interception back 31 yards with 1:05 left in the first period.

    “That was big for us. Our defense has done it all year,” Corner Canyon coach Eric Kjar said. “They’ve scored in every game for us so far. Three pick-6s and a safety so far.”

    CORNER CANYON 44, TIMPVIEW 7
    • Corner Canyon quarterback Zach Wilson throws for 177 yards and rushes for 142 yards in the victory.
    • Colton Lawson catches six passes for 100 yards and two touchdowns.
    • Jake Biggs passes for 138 yards for Timpview, but 59 of those came on one play — a TD pass to Hunter Erickson late in the third.

    It was mostly the Zach Wilson Show after that.

    The Boise State recruit finished with 177 yards passing and rushed for 142 yards on his 27 carries.

    Even with the bad weather, Wilson made the Thunderbirds defense pay through the air.

    He evaded a Timpview rush, rolled left then flicked an easy 37-yard TD pass to Lawson racing down the left sideline early in the third quarter.

    “He’s pretty special,” Kjar said about Wilson. “Just athletic running the ball and throwing the ball. Obviously his run game really made a difference.”

    Timpview committed a fumble deep in its own territory on the first play of the next drive. Chargers running back Tai Gonzales, who finished with 73 yards rushing and two touchdowns, scored from the 1 for a 31-0 lead.

    It went from bad to worse for the visitors when senior linebacker Chandler Sorenson was injured while tackling Wilson and taken from the field on a stretcher as a precaution.

    “They had a couple of kids out [coming into the game], but I thought our kids played well,” Kjar said. “Our defense set the tone, and I was happy with the way our offense competed.”


    Commentary: Graham-Cassidy bill is not the answer for U.S. health care


    The debate about U.S. health care reform and the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has once again “risen from the dead” in the form of the Graham-Cassidy bill in the Senate. Amazingly, instead of getting better, each attempt to...

    The debate about U.S. health care reform and the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has once again “risen from the dead” in the form of the Graham-Cassidy bill in the Senate. Amazingly, instead of getting better, each attempt to repeal and replace the ACA appears to be getting worse.

    With any health care reform, the primary points of emphasis should be: 1. Improved access to health care for all. 2. Improved quality of the care delivered. 3. Lower health care costs for all stakeholders. Unfortunately, the Graham-Cassidy bill as proposed provides no assurance that any of these aims will be attained.

    While the ACA is far from perfect, it did initiate some much-needed reform in the way US healthcare is delivered. Many of these gains would likely suffer if the Graham-Cassidy bill were passed. Looking at the bill in summary:

    • It would eliminate the federal insurance exchange and subsidies and tax credits under the ACA that help people afford insurance. All federal subsidies would end in 2026.

    • It would eliminate penalties for not obtaining health care insurance, which could shrink the pool of insured, which would likely contribute to increased premiums.

    • Instead of subsidies it would provide fixed state block grants but does not require states to use these block grants to help lower income people buy insurance coverage.

    • Under the ACA, insurance plans must provide defined essential healthcare benefits and charge everyone the same premium regardless of pre-existing conditions. Graham-Cassidy would allow individual states to waive this requirement, which would create serious inequalities in coverage and once again discriminate against people with pre-existing conditions making healthcare for them unaffordable. Changing the essential health benefits (EHBs) requirements would also undermine the ban on lifetime and annual caps that apply only to EHBs. These changes could render patient protections meaningless.

    • It would drastically change the Medicaid program by ending Medicaid expansion entirely in 2020 and cap funding overall and it would redistribute the funds that are being used to support the current Medicaid expansion. It would attempt to equalize payments among states, which would penalize states that expanded Medicaid and reward states that did not.

    • It provides no dedicated funding for substance abuse treatment which given the current public crisis around opioid use is problematic.

    All of this is happening in the most partisan manner imaginable as a “Republican Only” initiative in the Senate. Under the Senate process of “budget reconciliation” floor debate on bills is limited to 20 hours and there is no use of a filibuster to block legislation. Also under budget reconciliation the Senate would only need 50 votes to pass the bill until Sept. 30, when they would once again need 60 votes.

    As a result, there is a rush to jam this bill through before Sept. 30, with none of the due consideration in committees and floor debate that something this important deserves. And, perhaps most disconcerting, is the fact that the Congressional Budget Office will not have time to score the bill in terms of its impact on coverage for Americans or how premiums will be affected.

    Something as important as health care deserves a much more measured approach and careful thought than the current process, and it must be a bi-partisan approach that works for all. The U.S. currently spends more than 18 percent of our gross domestic product on health care, which is over $3 trillion annually, yet we rank 37th in health outcomes worldwide and we still have over 30 million people without coverage. We can and must do better, but Graham-Cassidy is not the answer.

    James A Jorgenson, R.Ph., M.S., FASHP, Sandy, is CEO at Visante, a multi-national health care consulting firm supporting both hospitals and health systems as well as the insurance and payer community.

    Undefeated champ Andre Ward retires, desire no longer there


    Oakland, Calif. • Andre Ward decided to end his career on top.Ward announced Thursday he is retiring from boxing because he no longer has the desire to fight, leaving the sport at age 33 with an undefeated record and the light heavyweight...

    Oakland, Calif. • Andre Ward decided to end his career on top.

    Ward announced Thursday he is retiring from boxing because he no longer has the desire to fight, leaving the sport at age 33 with an undefeated record and the light heavyweight championship.

    Ward released a statement on his website titled ”Mission Accomplished ” thanking those who helped him throughout his career and explaining his reasons for his retirement.

    “I want to be clear — I am leaving because my body can no longer put up with the rigors of the sport and therefore my desire to fight is no longer there,” he wrote. “If I cannot give my family, my team, and the fans everything that I have, then I should no longer be fighting.”

    Ward is currently rated the best “pound for pound” boxer by Ring Magazine. But in an interview with ESPN’s First Take, he said he no longer wants to do the work leading to his bouts.

    “People see what I do fight night, they see under the lights, but they don’t see the toil, they don’t see the grind, they don’t see just the pain, the physical pain that you go through, not just in the fights, but to prepare and to get ready for those battles,” he said.

    “I felt the physicality of the sport, not just in the ring stuff, but the training and the preparation, start to take its toll on me for the last two or three years and I bit down and continued to push through and at this point, it’s time and I know it’s time.”

    Ward declined other interview requests through his publicist, saying he wanted to celebrate his retirement with family and friends.

    Ward has won all 32 of his fights, with 16 knockouts. He won the Olympic gold medal as a light heavyweight in 2004. Ward won the WBA super middleweight title in 2009 when he defeated Mikkel Kessler and unified that title in 2011 when he beat Carl Froch in the Super Six super middleweight tournament final.

    Ward then battled shoulder problems that kept him out of the ring and later went 19 months without a fight because of a protracted legal dispute with his former promoter, the late Dan Goosen.

    Ward got back in the ring in June 2015. He won the light heavyweight title in a disputed, unanimous decision against Sergey Kovalev in November 2016, taking all three belts in the process. Ward then beat Kovalev more decidedly in a rematch in June that was stopped in the eighth round.

    Kovalev said Ward’s retirement will be good for boxing because it will allow “good and strong” fighters to compete for the vacated titles. He also said through his Main Events promoter that he doesn’t concern himself with the possibility that Ward’s retirement won’t stick.

    “I don’t think about him at all because I’m looking forward (to reaching) my goals,” he said, adding that his last two fights are “history” and “I forgot it already.”

    He said he would have been happy to get a third fight, but not if he had to wait and take lesser bouts in the interim. Kovalev does wonder if Ward and his handlers are playing psychological games.

    “They did before second rematch,” he said. “I don’t know. I don’t care at all.”

    HBO said Ward will work as an analyst on its boxing broadcasts.

    “Andre Ward ends his boxing career as he only knew how to live it — as a champion at the top,” HBO executive vice president Peter Nelson said. “To watch Ward was to marvel at constant mastery of craft in the ring, to say nothing of his being the consummate role model outside it. The Hall of Fame will be lucky to have him.”


    Cassidy-Graham bill sponsors include favors for one potential Republican holdout


    Washington • An internal analysis by the Trump administration concludes that 31 states would lose federal money for health coverage under Senate Republicans’ latest effort to abolish much of the Affordable Care Act, with the politically critical...

    Washington • An internal analysis by the Trump administration concludes that 31 states would lose federal money for health coverage under Senate Republicans’ latest effort to abolish much of the Affordable Care Act, with the politically critical state of Alaska facing a 38 percent cut by 2026.

    The report, produced by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, focuses on the final year of a block grant that states would receive under the Cassidy-Graham legislation. It shows that government funding for such health insurance would be 9 percent lower in 2026 under the plan than under current law.

    The predicted loss is less than that forecast by three independent analyses of the bill’s impact in recent days, but the internal numbers show a similar checkerboard of states that would be big winners and equally big losers. The states that expanded their Medicaid programs under the ACA would be hit with the greatest reversals of federal aid.

    According to the CMS data, first reported Thursday night by Axios, the greatest winners in 2026 would be Mississippi and Kansas, where federal health care funding would more than triple and double, respectively. On the other hand, Connecticut’s aid would be cut by just over half.

    The method used by federal officials to predict the bill’s effects on spending to states differs from that of another major analysis released earlier on Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation. The latter concluded that 35 states would lose $160 billion under the bill. The Kaiser study, like two earlier this week, looked at the cumulative effect from 2020 to 2026, while the administration’s looked only at the first and last years in that time frame.

    The administration data also show that the fortunes would differ sharply in the home states of the legislation’s two primary sponsors, Sens. Bill Cassidy, R-La., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. Federal funding for coverage would plunge by 41 percent in Louisiana, whose health secretary this week publicly criticized the bill, while it would grow by 126 percent in South Carolina.

    A Health and Human Services Department spokesman did not respond Thursday night to a request for comment.

    A few sentences embedded in the 140-page Cassidy-Graham legislation would allow Alaska to avoid a reduction in government funding. A potential Republican holdout on the legislation, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, has been negotiating privately this week with Senate GOP leaders.

    Neither Murkowski nor the state’s junior senator, Dan Sullivan, R, have disclosed how they would vote if the bill is brought before the Senate next week, as Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., maintains he will do.

    It remained unclear late Thursday whether McConnell could amass the 50 votes needed under special budget procedures so that the measure could pass without any Democratic support. Given a previous bill’s dramatic last-minute failure in July, with critical opposition by Murkowski, some Republicans say they do not believe leaders will move it forward unless its passage is certain.

    The courting of Alaska’s senior senator comes as intense efforts by advocates and critics to sway opinion shift to outside Washington.

    Only one Republican senator is holding sessions with constituents on the measure. At a town hall meeting in Charles City, Iowa, Sen. Joni Ernst said Thursday that she was “leaning yes.”

    Kaiser found that the states that have not expanded Medicaid — all but one led by Republicans — would gain an average of 12 percent during that period.

    The bill would kill central features of the ACA, including its insurance subsidies, coverage requirements for individual Americans and large businesses, and benefits and other rules for health plans sold in marketplaces created under the law. Instead, in a devolution of unprecedented scale, a smaller amount of health care money would be reshuffled around the country as block grants for much of the coming decade, with states having great freedom on how to spend it.

    “By cutting and dramatically redistributing federal funds and asking each state to come up with their own health system, this bill runs the risk of a free-for-all with confusion and potentially chaos for many years to come,” Kaiser President Drew Altman said.

    Each of the analyses show that, regardless of whether Congress renewed spending for the block grants after 2026, federal aid for Medicaid would plummet nationwide, because the program’s entitlement funding would be replaced with a per-person cap. And over time, annual increases under that new method would tighten.

    The specific provision in the bill that would help Alaska would exempt “low-density” states from the per-person cap if their block grants would drop or stay level.

    Murkowski’s state is one of a few in which state officials are doing their own assessment of the legislation’s effects. Gov. Bill Walker, I, joined nine other governors this week in sending a letter to Senate leaders to express their opposition to the Cassidy-Graham bill in its current form.

    Murkowski’s office did not respond to a request for comment.

    Asked about a report about a new draft of the bill with Alaska-specific tweaks, Cassidy spokesman Ty Bofferding responded, “No changes of any kind have been finalized.”

    ---

    The Washington Post’s Sean Sullivan and David Weigel contributed to this report.


    Commentary: Single-payer health care is not the answer


    Recently, The Salt Lake Tribune published commentary supporting the expansion of Medicare and a single-payer health care system. Unfortunately, single-payer’s track record abroad reveals that substandard care, long waiting lists and rationing are...

    Recently, The Salt Lake Tribune published commentary supporting the expansion of Medicare and a single-payer health care system. Unfortunately, single-payer’s track record abroad reveals that substandard care, long waiting lists and rationing are endemic to such systems.

    Furthermore, people need to realize that health insurance is expensive because healthcare is expensive. Insurance will remain expensive whether private insurance companies are paying the claims or a single-payer is reimbursing providers for the claims.

    In Canada, the median patient waits more than four months to receive treatment from a specialist after referral from his primary-care physician. More than 50,000 people left Canada last year to receive medical treatment — partially because of waiting lists. In the United Kingdom’s National Health Service, 5 million patients will languish on waiting lists for non-emergency surgeries, such as hip replacements, by 2019.

    By comparison, American patients wait less than four weeks, on average.

    Rationing care is the single-payer’s solution for cutting health care costs. Britain’s National Health Service is facing what the government calls its “worst financial position in a generation.” Forty percent of hospitals are considering rationing care to save money. Some have already begun restricting access to hearing aids and hip and knee replacements.

    By contrast, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates insurance companies pay for more benefits than prior to the ACA. Americans also demand single-bed hospital rooms, best of care practices, and the best technology has to offer. This all comes at a cost.

    Single-payer systems don’t just ration care. They also artificially lower reimbursement rates for hospitals and doctors. In many cases, these payments don’t even cover the cost of providing certain treatments and procedures. Providers could not survive solely on Medicare reimbursement rates.

    Despite these stiff limits on spending, single-payer systems are still extremely expensive. Lawmakers in New York, California and Colorado have, or are considering, bills that would abolish private insurance and enroll all state residents in a single-payer system. These proposals would double their current states’ budgets.

    The millions of Americans who dream of a government-funded single-payer health care system should note the experiences of other countries before they jump to the conclusion that a single-payer system will provide higher quality care at a lower cost. A single-payer system will deliver rationing of care, lower standards of care and put further pressure on the federal government’s already overburdened budget.

    Craig Paulson is president of the Utah Association of Health Underwriters.


    Corner Canyon beats Brighton handily in girls' soccer


    Draper • After finishing a tidy 5-0 win over Brighton on Thursday afternoon, the Corner Canyon Chargers rushed off the field unknowing that they just had clinched a share of their school’s first region title in girls’ soccer.With little else on her...

    Draper • After finishing a tidy 5-0 win over Brighton on Thursday afternoon, the Corner Canyon Chargers rushed off the field unknowing that they just had clinched a share of their school’s first region title in girls’ soccer.

    With little else on her mind besides getting out of the cold, windy conditions, sophomore forward Kenli Coon had an abrupt and honest take on learning of her team’s accomplishment.

    “It’s freaking awesome!”

    Corner Canyon coach Krissa Reinbold quietly had been keeping track of the standings in recent weeks.

    “I track it, but I try not to talk to the girls about it,” Reinbold said. “For us, it’s been about continuing to prove ourselves. We feel like not a lot of people take our team very seriously yet. We’ve been building this program for a long time now, and we’ve got a special group this year. We’re not going to be satisfied until we have that region title to ourselves.”

    After heading into the halftime break knotted at 0-0 with second-place Brighton, the chance of clinching a portion of the Region 7 title still was up in the air. But everything began to click for the Chargers five minutes into the second half when Coon’s opening goal proved to be the game-winner.

    After weaving her way around the defenders in the midfield, Coon looked up and saw her chance as she blasted a shot toward the far post. Her shot was unable to avoid the outstretched hand of the Brighton goalkeeper, but it was powerful enough to hit the turf and trickle into the net to give the Chargers a 1-0 lead in the 45th minute.

    “I just followed play and hoped it would go in,” Coon said. “It was definitely a relief when I saw it roll in.”

    Another underclassman doubled Corner Canyon’s lead 10 minutes later when junior Makenzie Taylor unknowingly found the net in the 55th minute.

    Following a deflected Charger corner kick, the junior attacker put her laces on a half-volley with the hope of delivering a dangerous ball across the face of goal for a teammate to pounce on. Luckily for her, the perfectly placed cross-shot evaded all bodies and found the side netting at the far post to give Corner Canyon a 2-0 lead.

    “I didn’t even see it go in the goal,” Taylor said. “I just saw the ball fall down after it hit the net. I don’t know how that happened.”

    But what Taylor does know is that her team has a knack for finding offense after slow starts.

    “The fire that we can come out with in the second half is unreal with this team,” she said. “I see our team come out, and I know we can do it.”

    The offense continued to flow in the second half when senior Makenzie Easton added a pair of headed goals, and fellow senior Hallee Jones added the finishing touch as the Chargers improved their winning streak to nine games.

    Students kept inside after mountain lion spotted near Oak Ridge Elementary School in Salt Lake City


    A mountain lion sighting prompted Granite School District to order students and staff at Oak Ridge Elementary School to “shelter in place” Thursday morning.District spokesman Ben Horsely said staffers at the southeast Salt Lake City school spotted...

    A mountain lion sighting prompted Granite School District to order students and staff at Oak Ridge Elementary School to “shelter in place” Thursday morning.

    District spokesman Ben Horsely said staffers at the southeast Salt Lake City school spotted the big cat moving through the wooded foothills abutting the east end of the campus about 11:30 a.m.

    Under the shelter-in-place order, students and staff were not allowed outside the buildings. Parents were asked to pick up their students inside the school.

    Granite School District police officers also were on the campus to keep watch, but no further sightings of the lion were reported as of early afternoon.

    The district says the school, at 4325 S. Jupiter Drive (roughly 3800 East), generally has about 450 students enrolled.

    Austin Bartholomew helps lead confident Weber football team


    Pleasant View • The Weber football team, led by its senior quarterback, knew of only one way to respond to its season-opening loss to visiting American Fork more than a month ago.“We talked a little bit about resiliency and bouncing back,” Austin...

    Pleasant View • The Weber football team, led by its senior quarterback, knew of only one way to respond to its season-opening loss to visiting American Fork more than a month ago.

    “We talked a little bit about resiliency and bouncing back,” Austin Bartholomew said. “That wasn’t the way we wanted to start our season, but there’s not much else you can do but learn from it and move on.”

    The Warriors have put together four straight victories — by an average margin of 22 points — since their 54-39 setback to American Fork.

    “The kids have the belief and the will and effort and have done the work because they want to be good,” Weber’s fifth-year coach Matt Hammer said. “In the American Fork game, where we had a few plays go the other way on us, the kids knew how close they were [to victory].

    “We just had to get better, and it took them a couple games to get going — on offense and defense.”

    AUSTIN BARTHOLOMEW
    School • Weber
    Year • Senior
    Position • Quarterback
    Passing yards • 1,009
    Rushing yards • 297
    Passing TDs • 7
    Rushing TDs • 1

    It started with their quarterback, who knew he was ready to lead a high-powered offense around him, but also needed to refine his own game.

    A costly interception swung the early momentum in the opener, yet the Warriors will look to continue allowing their quarterback to throw deep.

    Bartholomew has thrown for seven touchdowns through five games. He said the Warriors like to take chances with deep passes but have a variety of ways to excel.

    “We have so many options,” Bartholomew said. “Teams can’t game plan for one person because someone else will step up and make plays. Coach Hammer always talks about how any night could be anyone’s night to just go off. We have so many options and so much versatility.”

    Part of that attack and a teammate Bartholomew praised was running back Carter Green, who he said opens up the field for others.

    “We have a real power running game,” Bartholomew said, “but we also have a lot of athletes who allow us to throw the ball around the yard.”

    Despite the loss in Week 1, Green knew the offense could put up points the rest of the season.

    “We just stayed true to what we do,” Green said. “We weren’t discouraged at all. We knew if we could beat Roy [a 38-28 victory in Week 2], we could get on a roll and continue the rest of the season.”

    The defense elevated its play as well.

    Green, an outside linebacker when needed, saw a renewed emphasis on stopping the run.

    “We’re continuing to get better at it,” Green said. “Our defensive line has been closing their gaps and allowed the linebackers to run free and make plays.”

    Two of the Warriors’ four wins have come by shutout.

    Hammer said he’s been waiting for this season as the senior class, led in large part by Bartholomew and Green, were standouts in the middle school programs he looked to build in conjunction with the varsity when he took over at Weber in 2013.

    “They’ve been running the same stuff that we were as seventh- and eighth-graders,” Hammer said. “It’s a lot of kids that have been in our program for a long time.”

    With his final high school season halfway gone, Bartholomew and his team are intent on fulfilling a goal they set before their opening loss and ensuing win streak.

    “We thought we’d have a great shot at a Region 1 title,” he said. “Win region and then run the table.”


    ‘Stronger’ gives authentic portrait of Boston Marathon bombing survivor‘ ‘s recovery


    With intense grit and a minimum of sugar-coating, the true-life drama “Stronger” tells a powerful personal story of tough love and reluctant heroism during the horrific events of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.Jeff Bauman, played here by Jake...

    With intense grit and a minimum of sugar-coating, the true-life drama “Stronger” tells a powerful personal story of tough love and reluctant heroism during the horrific events of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

    Jeff Bauman, played here by Jake Gyllenhaal, was there, literally feet from the first pressure-cooker bomb that went off that Patriots’ Day. Jeff, who worked in the meat department of a local Costco, was there to impress his on-again, off-again girlfriend, Erin Hurley (Tatiana Maslany), who was running in the marathon on behalf of the hospital where she worked.

    Gyllenhaal, director David Gordon Green (“Our Brand Is Crisis”) and first-time screenwriter John Pollono (adapting Bauman’s memoir) depict the pre-marathon Jeff as something of a screw-up. He’s still living with his blowsy mom, Patty (Miranda Richardson), and more apt to hang around and get drunk with his buddies than remember a date with Erin.

    Then comes the bombing and its aftermath. Jeff loses both his legs in the blast (the gory details of which are saved until deep into the movie, as traumatic flashbacks). His family, led by Patty and his dad, Big Jeff (Clancy Brown), and friends gather at the hospital, arguing and fending off reporters who try to sneak into the waiting area. Erin joins them, and she’s the first one Jeff wants to see when he comes out of his coma. Jeff, still with a breathing tube in his throat, writes a note — “I saw the bomber” — which helps the FBI find the killers.

    For Jeff, though, the hardest part is yet to come: a long recovery, as he learns to navigate basic life skills without legs and endures physical therapy on prosthetic legs. Erin is there for him through much of this, though the effort — and Patty’s frosty opinion of her — strains their relationship.

    As Jeff recovers, so does the city, with the ubiquitous “Boston Strong” slogan. He is invited to be a part of that groundswell of emotion, like when he waves the team flag at a Boston Bruins game, but becomes uncomfortable with the “hero” label.

    Pollono’s script explores all of Bauman’s conflicting emotions, and Green’s unfussy direction gives Gyllenhaal room to flesh them out fully. Green — whose résumé ranges from indies like “Prince Avalanche” to comedies like “Pineapple Express” — deftly handles the special-effects challenge of showing Gyllenhaal without legs, as actor and director collaborate seamlessly to show the physical challenges of Jeff’s new life.

    As good as Gyllenhaal is, Maslany is the foundation of “Stronger.” Best known for her multiple roles on TV’s “Orphan Black,” she channels Erin’s swallowed pain and guilt — the notion that Jeff wouldn’t have been there that day if not for her — in a performance that’s pure fire.

    The honesty of “Stronger” is perhaps its greatest element. Unlike director Peter Berg’s hamfisted “Patriots’ Day” last year, this movie doesn’t need to manufacture phony heroes or squeeze false emotion out of a terrible tragedy. It shows people, being as real as they can be outside a documentary, and trusts the audience will connect to them.

    * * * 1/2
    ’Stronger’
    A gritty, realistic drama about the Boston Marathon bombing, capturing the painful recovery of double amputee Jeff Bauman.
    Where • Area theaters.
    When • Opens Friday, Sept. 22.
    Rating • R for language throughout, some graphic injury images, and brief sexuality/nudity.
    Running time • 116 minutes.

    ‘A new musician that is the sum of us,’ Bill Charlap and Renee Rosnes, will open 2017-18 JazzSLC series


    There’s an unconscious intimacy that comes with longtime relationships — the teasing of inside jokes, completing each other’s sentences, knowing which arguments to avoid.Of course that connection carries over into music, which raises the prospects...

    There’s an unconscious intimacy that comes with longtime relationships — the teasing of inside jokes, completing each other’s sentences, knowing which arguments to avoid.

    Of course that connection carries over into music, which raises the prospects of a unique opener for the JazzSLC series this Saturday when piano duo Bill Charlap and Renee Rosnes take the stage. It’s not so much the couple dynamic that’s unusual — there was last year’s pairing of chanteuse Stacey Kent and her husband, Jim Tomlinson, or Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, for that matter.

    This time, it’s the instruments that make this coupling unique.

    Rosnes and Charlap have been playing together since the 1990s, but made it official when they married in 2007.

    “When we first played together, the chemistry was there right away,” Charlap says. “It’s mutual respect. But then you have the added intimacy of how much you care about each other. It’s a nice [musical] conversation.”

    For the couple, the connection is innate. The give and take of jazz is so intuitive anyway, Rosnes says, it’s hard to distinguish how playing with a spouse differs from playing with your regular ensemble.

    “The audience may be able to answer that question better than we can,” she says. “They are witnessing it. We don’t really think about it.”

    Both have separate musical careers and distinct discographies. Charlap, 50, comes from a musical family. His mother, singer Sandy Stewart, was a regular on Perry Como’s “Kraft Music Hall.” His father was Moose Charlap, a Broadway composer. Charlap’s long list of recordings includes work with his mother, Tony Bennett and the New York Trio. He was in Salt Lake City a year ago performing with the New York Five.

    Rosnes, 55, was born and raised in Canada. In 1985, she received a Canadian Council of the Arts grant and moved to New York City. She has played with James Moody, Ron Carter and Billy Drummond. She hosted the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s “Jazz Profiles” radio show and is a founding member of the SF JAZZ Collective. Her 2017 album, “Written in the Rocks,” received a Juno Award (Canada’s equivalent of the Grammy).

    Together, the couple recorded an album of piano duets, “Double Portrait,” in 2010. They practice on the two Steinways nested together in their New Jersey living room.

    Salt Lake audience members can expect the couple to draw on all of that music during Saturday’s show — George Gershwin, Gerry Mulligan, Wayne Shorter, as well as some original compositions.

    “People say, ‘Oh, you have a piano duo.’ And that’s entirely correct. But it’s so much more than that,” Charlap says. “It’s a duo in every sense. There’s no competition. It’s a new musician that is the sum of us.”

    If 176 piano keys merging in improvisation sounds messy, Rosnes cautions: “It’s possible for the music to get muddy. We’re very conscious of that. We’re judicious in how we create the overall sounds. We’re aiming for a very clear and orchestrated sound.”

    This week’s show is unusual. Charlap and Rosnes are not touring together. She’s about to go back into the studio to record. And his latest album, “Uptown Downtown,” was released last week.

    But JazzSLC founder Gordon Hanks asked the couple — “super nice folks; brilliant artists” — to headline the 2017-18 season opener.

    Bill Charlap and Renee Rosnes
    When • 
    Saturday, Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m.
    Where • Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City
    Tickets • $29.50; artsaltlake.org

    Seoul media say North might test nuke in Pacific


    Seol, South Korea • South Korean media report North Korea’s top diplomat says his country may test a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean to fulfill leader Kim Jong Un’s vow to take the “highest-level” action against the United States.Foreign...

    Seol, South Korea • South Korean media report North Korea’s top diplomat says his country may test a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean to fulfill leader Kim Jong Un’s vow to take the “highest-level” action against the United States.

    Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho comments Thursday on the sidelines of a United Nations gathering followed an extraordinary direct statement by Kim in response to President Donald Trump’s threat to “totally destroy” the North.

    South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reports that Ri told reporters in New York that a response “could be the most powerful detonation of an H-bomb in the Pacific.”

    Ri reportedly added that “We have no idea about what actions could be taken as it will be ordered by leader Kim Jong Un.”

    Such a test would be considered a major provocation by Washington and its allies.


    Utes’ defense faces stiff test in Pac-12 opener at Arizona


    You can make the case that Utah has had an advantage in talent and athleticism over each of its first three opponents, but the playing field begins to level out this week with the start of Pac-12 play.The Utes go into Friday’s clash at Arizona knowing...

    You can make the case that Utah has had an advantage in talent and athleticism over each of its first three opponents, but the playing field begins to level out this week with the start of Pac-12 play.

    The Utes go into Friday’s clash at Arizona knowing they could lose even if they play well, especially if they lose one particular position battle. Arizona (2-1) comes into this game ranked sixth in Football Bowl Subdivision at rushing with 328 yards per game, while Utah is second-best in defending the run nationally at 49 ypg.

    “We pride ourselves on stopping the run, especially this year, so we do look forward to this team,” Utes defensive end Bradlee Anae said. “They’re a very good running team. That’s something we do look forward to, going against a really good team so we can test how good of a run stop defense we are.”

    The Utes (3-0) won’t have to look far for reminders of Arizona’s capabilities. Until it won last year’s game at Rice-Eccles Stadium, Arizona had won four consecutive games in the series, averaging 240.6 yards rushing per game against the Utes since Rich Rodriguez took over as Wildcats coach.

    Pac-12 play has arrived for the Utes. They start at Arizona. Kyle Whittingham: "They're as good as anyone in the country running the ball" pic.twitter.com/hjmWiwub1p

    — Lynn Worthy (@LWorthySports) September 20, 2017

    “Rich has got a great grasp of offensive scheme,” Utes coach Kyle Whittingham said. “He knows exactly what he wants to do. It starts with the run game. They run the read zone as well as anybody in the country. They’ve got a quarterback [Brandon Dawkins] who is an exceptional runner.”

    A 6-foot-3, 210-pound redshirt junior, Dawkins has passed for 422 yards and four touchdowns and rushed for 251 yards and five touchdowns through three games. In Arizona’s lone loss against Houston, Dawkins rushed for 26 yards.

    “A running quarterback changes a lot just because you know you have to plaster and you have to guard guys for a lot longer because he can make plays with his feet and he’s looking down the field so then he can throw it at the same time,” Utah cornerback Julian Blackmon said. “We can’t really come off coverage. We’ve just got to really be disciplined with our defense.”

    While the Utes have a wealth of first-hand experience against Arizona’s offense, the Wildcats defense will face a Utes offense with a decidedly different look than years past.

    Sophomore quarterback Tyler Huntley’s presence alone makes the Utes’ offense more dynamic — he has averaged 289.3 yards passing and 70.7 yards rushing in three games as the starter — but he has help.

    Senior wide receiver Darren Carrington II, a graduate transfer from the University of Oregon, has 409 yards and four touchdowns receiving through three games. Four players, including Carrington, have caught passes of 20 yards or more in the new offensive system installed by first-year coordinator Troy Taylor.

    “They’ve always been really athletic, but it’s a different scheme, of course,” Rodriguez said. “They’re spreading you out, making you defend the whole width of the field and using some tempo and obviously using some quarterback runs and quarterback zone reads. They’ve got a very athletic guy back there, and they’ve got some talented guys in the backfield and on the perimeter.They’re well-coached. Their scheme provides a lot of stress for your defense.”

    The Utes’ new-look offense will likely play a big part if they are able to win in Arizona Stadium for the first time since 2011.

    UTAH AT ARIZONA
    At Arizona Stadium, Tucson, Ariz.
    Kickoff • 8:30 p.m. MDT
    TV • FS1
    Radio • 700 AM, Sirius XM 84
    Records • Utah 3-0, Arizona 2-1
    Series history • Utah leads 21-19-2
    Last meeting • Utah 36, Arizona 23 (2016)
    About the Utes • Quarterback Tyler Huntley ranks 14th in FBS in completion percentage (72.1), and he has accounted for 76 percent of Utah’s offensive yards through three games. … Utah moved into The Associated Press Top 25 for the first time this season following last weekend’s win over San Jose State. Utah is ranked No.23 in the AP poll and No. 21 in the Coaches’ poll. … Kicker Matt Gay, a former Utah Valley University soccer player, leads all kickers in points (44) and ranks second in FBS. He has gone 11-for-11 on field goal attempts and has kicked the longest field goal in the country so far in college football this season (56 yards). … Redshirt freshman wide receiver Samson Nacua recorded a career-high 59 yards on seven catches against SJSU last week. Nacua is the team’s second-leading receiver behind Darren Carrington II.
    About the Wildcats • Quarterback Brandon Dawkins went 18-for-21 for 155 yards passing with three touchdowns and no interceptions in his most recent start against UTEP. Dawkins registered a passer efficiency rating of 194.86 in that game. He also rushed 14 times for 133 yards and three touchdowns. … Safety Demetrius Flannigan-Fowles comes into the weekend tied for the FBS lead with three interceptions. He also has a fumble recovery and 12 tackles. … Punt returner Shun Brown has two returns for touchdowns in three games. Brown has averaged 27 yards per return on five returns this season. … Arizona played 27 freshmen, including 17 true freshmen, in its first three games. 

    Utah State linebacker Suli Tamaivena’s tough road to Logan has smoothed out


    Logan • A current snapshot of Utah State linebacker Suli Tamaivena is somewhat familiar to fans of college football in the state of Utah.He’s a junior, but older than most others in that class. He’s also married, has a year-old son and another...

    Logan • A current snapshot of Utah State linebacker Suli Tamaivena is somewhat familiar to fans of college football in the state of Utah.

    He’s a junior, but older than most others in that class. He’s also married, has a year-old son and another child on the way.

    But the Kirkland, Wash., native is even older than, say, a player who once served a two-year church mission.

    Tamaivena, in fact, is 24 and only this year got his first experience of playing Division I football — although his athleticism has never been in question since his high school years.

    When asked how he found his way to Logan and a starting role for the Aggies, Tamaivena cuts to the chase:

    “I just went through a lot of academic problems. But I’m just very blessed that Utah State has stuck around all that long.” he said.

    Tamaivena for Mt. San Antonio Junior College (Calif.) in 2014 and 2015. But not making the grade in the classroom kept him from fulfilling a commitment to play at Washington State.

    Utah State at San Jose State
    Saturday, 5:30 p.m. MDT
    Live Stream • Facebook

    Though his his playing days with the Mounties were over, Tamaivena stayed enrolled in classes at Mt. Sac and became eligible to transfer, this time to Utah State.

    A starter in all three games for the Aggies this season, Tamaivena has totaled 21 tackles, including eight in last week’s loss at Wake Forest.

    “He’s multi-faceted. He rushes the edge real well and is a real good blitzer for us,” said Utah State inside linebackers coach Stacy Collins.

    “We finished up his classes, got his A.A. (Associates of Arts degree) and got here in the summer,” Collins said. “He went to work right away. That’s one of the tremendous things that he’s done.”

    This recent stretch, though, is just a part of the story for Tamaivena and his twin brother Sitiveni, who is also a junior — at the University of New Mexico.

    Upon completion of high school, with the road to college football impeded by academic difficulties just to qualify, Sitiveni instead dropped away from the sport and concentrated on a family tradition: rugby.

    Levi Tamaivena, Suli and Sitiveni’s dad, played on the Fiji national rugby team from 1991 to 1999.

    But it was mom Sera who talked the boys back to football — and taking the JC route back to eligibility.

    “We kept ourselves fit, but our mom just kept begging us to come back to football,” Tamaivena said.

    Part of the trek to get to the D-I level included an initial verbal agreement for the brothers to play for San Jose State, this week’s opponent for Utah State.

    But the Tamaivena brothers, now at Mt. San Antonio, flipped their commitment to Washington State when one of the San Jose State coaches responsible for their recruitment departed from the school.

    Changing minds didn’t mean the plan went into action. When the brothers squared away their eligibility, Suli made the painful decision to split geographically from his twin.

    “It was hard letting him go,” Tamaivena said. “My wife said, ‘C’mon, what are you talking about? You’re not married to him, you’re married to me.’ My wife wanted to come here.”Utah State, according to Tamaivena, has done its part and, so far, he’s doing his.

    “It’sgood. It’s not like in juco,” he said. “When you miss something, they’re on youright away. You don’t want to deal with the consequencesafter. You learn from that and you don’t want to do it any more.”

    Utah native and former RSL player Phanuel Kavita coping with Hurricane Maria

    Utah native and former RSL player Phanuel Kavita coping with Hurricane Maria


    Former Real Salt Lake defender Phanuel Kavita sat staring at the television as images of Puerto Rico flitted across the screen. He rattled off a string to texts to his teammates. “How is it?” he typed over and over again.At 2 a.m. the response came...

    Former Real Salt Lake defender Phanuel Kavita sat staring at the television as images of Puerto Rico flitted across the screen. He rattled off a string to texts to his teammates.

    “How is it?” he typed over and over again.

    At 2 a.m. the response came in from one: “Yep, no power.”

    Then from another: “It begins.”

    Kavita, a product of the RSL academy who grew up in Utah, was one of just four Puerto Rico FC players who evacuated the territory ahead of Hurricane Maria, he said. He retreated to Gainesville, Florida Tuesday with his girlfriend, Kristy Smith, and has spent the majority of his time since they landed scanning the news and checking on his teammates.

    “It’s painful because you think about, we were just there,” he said. “And how would we have dealt with the situation? But luckily we were able to get out, so now when you see [those texts], you’re just like, I’m praying that they’re doing well, I’m praying that they’re safe, praying that nothing happens to them at all.”

    Puerto Rico FC, an NASL team, had the option of staying in the United States after their 0-0 draw at North Carolina FC Saturday. They sat in the Fort Lauderdale airport the next day discussing their options as the Maria was upgraded to a Category 3 storm and then to Category 5.

    All but three players decided to return to Puerto Rico. Kavita went back with them.

    “Irma came, and it wasn’t as bad per say, but we predicted it to be really bad,” Kavita said. “So for Irma I decided to go home [to Utah], and this one it was kind of like, oh we’ll just stick around and prepare for it.”

    Hurricane Irma barely missed Puerto Rico two weeksago, but it still caused damage. Kavita said some of his teammates hadjust gotten power back in their homes when they returned from North Carolina. They didn’tknow it at the time, but that was nothing compared to the destruction Mariawould inflict on Puerto Rico.

    Kavita made a Costco run Monday to stock up on hurricane supplies. Every store he went to was already sold out of water, so he took a jug from the team’s training session that day.

    Just when Kavita felt prepared to ride out the storm, Smith’s mother called. She had bought plane tickets to Gainesville for Smith and Kativa.

    They left on warm and sunny Tuesday morning.

    “You would never guess there would be a massive storm coming,” Kavita said.

    Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico Wednesday morning as a Category 4 storm. It was reportedly the strongest hurricane to directly hit Puerto Rico in over 80 years.

    Heavy wind and rain pummeled the island and knocked out the power in the entire territory, as reported by CNN. Governor Ricardo Rosselló told CNN it could take months to restore power to the entire territory.

    Kavita followed the storm’s destruction from Smith’s extended family’s house in Gainesville, texting the team’s group chat and counting each response. The power outage left some of the players without any means of communication, but through the buddy system Kavita was able to account for all of them.

    Seattle at RSL
    Saturday, 7:30 p.m.
    TV • KMYU

    Footage of Kavita’s neighborhood, Isla Verde, aired on TV to show the damage of the hurricane.

    “So much wind, so much debris flying everywhere,” Kavita said. “The road was covered with debris and trees.”

    Now he waits. Puerto Rico FC is scheduled to play in Indianapolis Saturday, but Kavita said Wednesday he was not not certain that they will play, or what his travel plans will look like if they do.

    “Everything’s kind of up in the air,” he said.


    Girl hit by foul ball at Yankees game gets game's attention


    New York • It might be the shot heard around the baseball world: the rocket-like foul ball that hit a young girl at a New York Yankees game.In the hours after the girl was struck in the face by the 105-mph screamer, the game’s commissioner vowed to...

    New York • It might be the shot heard around the baseball world: the rocket-like foul ball that hit a young girl at a New York Yankees game.

    In the hours after the girl was struck in the face by the 105-mph screamer, the game’s commissioner vowed to push harder for all teams to extend protective netting to the end of the dugouts and the Cincinnati Reds committed to do just that by next year.

    Several legal observers of baseball, which has long been shielded from lawsuits over fan injuries, saw it as a potential game changer.

    “America’s pastime is breaking America’s heart. That little girl, that’s everyone’s daughter,” said lawyer Bob Hilliard, who represents fans in a California lawsuit that seeks class action status to sue on behalf of 1,750 fans hit by balls and bats at games each year.

    The line drive off the bat of Yankees slugger Todd Frazier on Wednesday hit the girl in the face in less than a second, and the game came to a halt as she was treated in the stands. Frazier and other players from the Yankees and Minnesota Twins kneeled in prayer, and many fans were in stunned silence or in tears.

    The toddler remained hospitalized Thursday. Her father said soon after she was hit, “She’s doing all right. Just keep her in your thoughts.”

    In a statement Thursday, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred called the events “extremely upsetting.”

    “Over the past few seasons MLB has worked with our clubs to expand the amount of netting in our ballparks,” Manfred said. “In light of yesterday’s event, we will redouble our efforts on this important issue.”

    About a third of the 30 major league teams, the Yankees not among them, have at the commissioner’s urging extended the netting to at least the far end of the dugout. The Reds have promised to do it by next season’s Opening Day.

    Hilliard’s lawsuit seeks to go further, to force clubs to extend protective netting from foul pole to foul pole. But like other lawsuits over decades, it was tossed out. An appeal is set to be heard in San Francisco in December.

    “A day at the ballpark should not be a game of Russian Roulette, especially for children injured by projectiles in disturbingly disproportionate numbers,” lawyers wrote in court papers seeking the lawsuit’s reinstatement.

    Most of the fans struck by balls and bats at games each year suffer minor injuries, but a few have been critically injured or killed. The more tragic results include a 14-year-old boy who died four days after he was hit on the left side of his head at Dodger Stadium in May 1970 and a 39-year-old woman who died a day after she was struck in the temple by a foul ball at a San Angelo Colts game in 2010.

    But fans may be unaware of the stark legal reality of baseball: Successfully suing teams over such cases is nearly impossible. The fine print on every baseball ticket comes with a disclaimer that the bearer “assumes all risk and danger incidental to the game.”

    For the last century or so, baseball has been virtually immune from such lawsuits because of what has become known as the Baseball Rule.

    Ed Edmonds, a retired professor of law at Notre Dame Law School who co-authored “Baseball Meets the Law,” said at least two states, Idaho and Indiana, have turned away from automatic application of the Baseball Rule. But four other states, Arizona, Colorado, Illinois and New Jersey, passed legislation protecting teams from lawsuits.

    New York real estate executive Andy Zlotnick, who unsuccessfully sued the Yankees after he was hit in the face by a ball at a game six years ago, said he required major reconstructive surgery and still has throbbing pain in his cheek, numbness in his lips and gums, double vision and retina damage. He said he has not gone to a game since.

    “Nobody should go to a ballpark and come out without an eye or disabled,” he said. “Enough is enough.”


    Eugene Robinson: The devolution of repeal-and-replace


    Washington - Motivated by the cynical aims of fulfilling a bumper-sticker campaign promise and lavishing tax cuts on the wealthy, Republicans are threatening to pass a health care bill they know will make millions of Americans sicker and poorer. Do they...

    Washington - Motivated by the cynical aims of fulfilling a bumper-sticker campaign promise and lavishing tax cuts on the wealthy, Republicans are threatening to pass a health care bill they know will make millions of Americans sicker and poorer. Do they think we don’t see what they’re doing?

    Does Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, think we didn’t hear what he said Wednesday? “You know, I could maybe give you 10 reasons why this bill shouldn’t be considered,” he told reporters. “But Republicans campaigned on this so often that you have a responsibility to carry out what you said in the campaign. That’s pretty much as much of a reason as the substance of the bill.”

    There you have it: Who cares what this legislation would do? Vote for it anyway.

    The GOP’s efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act have undergone a process of devolution, with each new bill worse than the last. The measure that the Senate plans to vote on next week essentially takes away most of the protections, benefits and funding of the ACA, but leaves in place most of the taxes.

    That’s supposed to be good politics? Seriously?

    In his desperate haste, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has decided not to wait for the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office to analyze the bill before bringing it to the Senate floor. The CBO estimated that July’s Better Care Reconciliation Act, which would have repealed the ACA with a vague promise to replace it later, would have caused 32 million people to lose health insurance coverage. Some outside experts fear the impact of this new bill could be even worse.

    I should acknowledge that the measure -- sponsored by Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Bill Cassidy, R-La., Dean Heller, R-Nev., and Ron Johnson, R-Wisc. -- would do one popular thing: Eliminate the requirement that individuals purchase health insurance or pay a fine. But the list of things that people surely won’t like is staggering.

    Perhaps chief among them is that the bill eliminates the ACA’s guarantee of affordable health insurance for people with pre-existing medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease or cancer. State officials would be able to let insurers charge whatever they wanted to the infirm and the elderly -- and also could let insurers reinstitute lifetime caps on coverage.

    In practice, this means that the old and the sick could be priced out of the insurance market. And it means that those who are insured but have expensive ailments could see their coverage expire after a certain dollar amount had been paid in benefits.

    At first glance, this looks like a gigantic gift to the insurance industry. But the powerful lobbying group America’s Health Insurance Plans came out strongly against the bill Wednesday, saying it “would have real consequences on consumers and patients by further destabilizing the individual market.” The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association opposes the measure as well, saying it would “increase uncertainty in the marketplace, making coverage more expensive and jeopardizing Americans’ choice of health plans.”

    The American Medical Association, the American Hospital Association and AARP adamantly oppose the new Senate bill as well. In fact, it is hard to find anyone who knows anything about health insurance who likes this monstrous creation.

    And I haven’t even mentioned the worst thing about the bill: It revokes the ACA’s expansion of the Medicaid program, which provided health coverage for millions of the working poor, and turns Medicaid into an underfunded block-grant program to be administered by the states. GOP rhetoric about federalism and local control is smoke designed to obscure the real goal, which is to dramatically slash the federal contribution toward Medicaid.

    In the short term, billions of health care dollars would effectively be transferred from states that participated in Medicaid expansion, such as California, to states that did not, such as Texas. In the long term, however, all states would suffer from inadequate federal funding of Medicaid, which is the primary payer for about two-thirds of nursing-home residents nationwide.

    There is a rational motive for all of this, although it’s a nefarious one that the GOP doesn’t like to talk about: Slashing Medicaid spending would make room for huge tax cuts that primarily benefit the rich. Yes, senators, we see that, too.

    It is tempting to let the Republican Party drive itself, Thelma-and-Louise style, off this cliff. But the human impact of the latest repeal-and-replace measure would be too tragic. Call your senator. Make a deafening noise. We must do everything we can to kill this bill.

    Eugene Robinson’s email address is [email protected]

    (c) 2017, Washington Post Writers Group


    Stars of science fiction and fantasy come out for Salt Lake Comic Con opener


    Jess Harnell, the rock star of cartoon voice actors, knows how to rev up a crowd.“I go to a lot of these cons, and Salt Lake City is the best comic con in the world,” Harnell said from the stage of the Salt Palace Convention Center’s Grand...

    Jess Harnell, the rock star of cartoon voice actors, knows how to rev up a crowd.

    “I go to a lot of these cons, and Salt Lake City is the best comic con in the world,” Harnell said from the stage of the Salt Palace Convention Center’s Grand Ballroom, ushering in the 2017 Salt Lake Comic Con.

    The event, in its fifth year, will have 60 celebrities and some 300 hours of panel programming over three days for fans of science fiction, fantasy, horror and other genres, said co-founder Bryan Brandenburg.

    “We’ve grown a lot, and we’ve got to the point where we feel this year will be our best year ever,” said the other co-founder, Dan Farr.

    An estimated 100,000 fans are expected to attend between Thursday and Saturday, seeing celebrities, getting autographs and photo ops, buying art and geek-friendly merchandise, and admiring the vast array of cosplayers dressed as their favorite characters from TV, movies, video games, comic books and other media.

    For the celebrities, it’s a chance to bond with fans.

    “I’m a science fiction fan and a nerd,” said Vanessa Marshall, a voice actor best known for her work on the animated series “Star Wars: Rebels.” “I used to go to San Diego Comic-Con by myself.”

    Going from being a fan to a participant in the “Star Wars” universe, she said, “is very jarring, but kind of a dream come true at the same time. … It touches my heart to be connected with it.”

    Conventions like this, she said, are “important, to get together and tell stories.”

    “We spend so much time in dark little booths, recording,” said actor Richard Horvitz, who gave voice to the cartoon alien Invader Zim. At a convention, he added, “I get to see the fruits of our labor.”

    Harnell, known for his voice work in shows such as “Animaniacs” and “Transformers,” said he looks forward to comic conventions for “the opportunity to hopefully make a positive difference to people.”

    “A lot of the people who attend comic cons are sort of socially outsiders, so they don’t get a lot of encouragement from the world,” Harnell said. “When they come to something like this, and they get encouragement from somebody whose work they like — or used to like or still like — it can make a huge difference to them.”

    Harnell, a Salt Lake Comic Con regular, plugged two events this weekend that he’s involved in: Friday night’s 21-and-over after-party at Club Sky, where his comic-metal band Rock Sugar will perform; and the “Twisted Toonz” panel, Saturday at 4 p.m. in the ballroom, in which Harnell, Horvitz, Marshall and other guests will deploy their voices in a comic reading of the “Back to the Future” script.

    One cancellation that will disappoint Salt Lake Comic Con fans: Comedy legend Dick Van Dyke will not appear at a panel, or do photo ops, as previously scheduled. Event organizers cited health concerns. Van Dyke, 91, will sign autographs.

    Salt Lake Comic Con
    When• Sept. 21-23
    Where• Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City
    Tickets• For online ticket and pass sales, schedules, cosplay rules and other information, go to saltlakecomiccon.com

    Rolly: Vietnam series is a reminder of the war that defined a generation and tore us apart


    While watching the Utah-San Jose State football game in my basement with two of my closest friends Saturday, my high school chum Tim turned to our pal Mike and, out of the blue, asked if he had any feelings about the fact that Mike had gone to Vietnam...

    While watching the Utah-San Jose State football game in my basement with two of my closest friends Saturday, my high school chum Tim turned to our pal Mike and, out of the blue, asked if he had any feelings about the fact that Mike had gone to Vietnam and Tim and I hadn’t.

    Mike shrugged it off, basically saying what happened, happened. That was 50 years ago, it’s over and we’ve all had good lives since that troubled time.

    But Tim’s unprompted question showed that it’s not over. It will never be over. He asked it with a tinge of guilt, even though he and I and Mike thought then and think now that it was an unnecessary war escalated by incompetent politicians at the expense of tens of thousands of young men and women from my ’60s generation.

    I bring this up because of the excellent 10-part Ken Burns series on Vietnam that has run all week and will continue next week on PBS.

    I have watched each episode intensely, and the emotions it evokes have consumed me. They brought back all those memories, regrets, anger and forgiveness that have lain dormant but have never completely disappeared for my generation.

    As the series explores the gradual acceleration of our military involvement as U.S. leaders misjudged the strength and resolve of the enemy while stubbornly backing a corrupt South Vietnam regime that did not have the support of its people, I keep reminiscing about our carefree high school days, when we were doing basic teenage stuff and had no idea what we were about to face.

    I remember dragging State Street with my buddies, trying to pick up girls, listening to the Beach Boys on the radio singing about the fun and joy of youth.

    Then President Lyndon Johnson, after promising in the 1964 campaign that he would not expand the war in Vietnam, expanded the war in Vietnam.

    The turmoil grew as most of us entered college and the draft began plucking some of us out of our comfort zone and into boot camps preparing them for war halfway around the world.

    I escaped the draft because of college deferments, as did Tim. Mike and another close friend, Paul, went into the military and then were shipped to Vietnam.

    I kept in touch with them by mail as campus life lured me into the protest movement embraced by colleges around the country. I was against the war and attended the rallies but never fully engaged with the anti-U.S. radicalism that emerged from the broader anti-war sentiment.

    When my friends came home, they were treated with contempt by protesters who acted like it was their fault. Some returning vets were spat upon if they flew home still wearing their uniforms.

    To make matters worse, the returning Vietnam vets were unwelcome in service clubs patronized by veterans from Korea and World War II because the younger crowd, following the mores of the day, had long hair and looked like hippies.

    That’s what makes watching this series so tough but compelling. That war tore us apart. There also is some survivor’s guilt among some of us who stayed home and protested.

    When I was in Washington, D.C., several years ago, I visited the Vietnam Memorial containing the names of the more than 50,000 Americans who were killed in that conflict. I was looking for two names in particular, Steve Couch who graduated from Skyline a year before I did, and Don Williamson, who was in my class.

    At the base of the column where Williamson’s name appeared, someone had left a bottle of Coors beer and a pack of Lucky Strike cigarettes with a note to one of the fallen.

    The note spoke of the good times, carousing around, getting in a little trouble and then, the writer told his friend he was proud of him.

    Suddenly, I began bawling. I didn’t see that coming. I never do that. But I was inconsolable. That note just evoked too many raw memories.

    The enemy prevailed in Vietnam and the predictions that such an outcome would bring communism to our doors proved false. Today, Vietnam is a popular tourist stop for Americans who, when coming home, rave about the beauty of the land and the friendliness of the people.

    My Tribune colleague Chris Smart took a vacation there a few years ago. He told me that he met a young man who invited him to his family home in the north, the stronghold of the enemy during the war.

    In the home was an old man, who spoke to Chris through his grandson, who acted as an interpreter.

    Chris wanted to apologize to the old man, explaining that many of us back home were against the U.S. involvement in his country.

    The old man then grasped Chris’s hand and put it in between his own.

    Through the grandson, he told Chris, “We are brothers now.”

    After Chris related that story, I turned quickly away, walked through the newsroom avoiding eye contact with my colleagues. I made it to the men’s room, closed the door to one of the stalls and, once again, bawled.

    Utah forecast: Cold and wet in the north, windy and cooler south


    It may be autumn in the valleys of northern Utah, but there will be a decidedly wintry turn at the higher peaks of the Wasatch Front as the work week comes to a close.The National Weather Service predicts 4 inches to 8 inches of snow will fall on...

    It may be autumn in the valleys of northern Utah, but there will be a decidedly wintry turn at the higher peaks of the Wasatch Front as the work week comes to a close.

    The National Weather Service predicts 4 inches to 8 inches of snow will fall on northern and central mountain locales at 7,000 feet elevation and higher beginning Thursday evening and continuing through Friday morning.

    Indeed, a winter weather advisory was in place from Logan running south through Brigham City, Ogden, Salt Lake City, Park City, Provo and Nephew from 6 p.m. Thursday through noon Friday.

    Meanwhile, the Wasath Front’s valleys and benches will see increasing rain showers and tumbling temperatures. Friday’s early morning lows will be in the low-40s, and highs will be in the upper-50s — down 5 degrees to 7 degrees from Thursday.

    Rain tapers off by Saturday afternoon in the Salt Lake and Tooele valleys; daytime temperatures will be near 60 degrees.

    Southern Utahns will stay warmer, but a wind advisory was in place for the region from noon Thursday through 9 p.m., with southwest gusts of 50 mph expected.

    The forecast for Utah’s Dixie calls for highs in the low-70s Friday, a 10-degree dip from Thursday’s forecast. Saturday will see thermometers in the redrocks hovering around 70.

    “Green,” for healthy conditions, was the color chosen by the Utah Division of Air Quality for all monitoring stations as the week wound down.

    Allergy sufferers were getting something of a break, too: mold register at “high,” but sagebrush came in at “moderate” and other allergens as “low,” or not registering at all on the Intermountain Allergy & Asthma website’s pollen index Thursday.


    Kennecott workers offered more time off — with pay — to care for new babies


    Kennecott Utah Copper employees who are the primary caregiver of a newborn or adopted baby will get 18 weeks of paid parental leave, under a new worldwide policy of Rio Tinto, the mining and metals conglomerate that includes Kennecott.The new extended...

    Kennecott Utah Copper employees who are the primary caregiver of a newborn or adopted baby will get 18 weeks of paid parental leave, under a new worldwide policy of Rio Tinto, the mining and metals conglomerate that includes Kennecott.

    The new extended leave, which is offered to both men and women, was announced Thursday at a town hall for Kennecott employees at the Bingham Canyon Mine and in the company’s smelter operations. The company will give secondary caregivers one week of paid leave in the first year after a birth or adoption.

    Kennecott has 2,220 employees in Utah who could take advantage of the two options, said company spokesman Kyle Bennett.

    “Employees taking paid parental leave can focus on family duties knowing their job will be protected while they’re away,” said Rio Tinto CEO Jean-Sebastien Jacques in a news release. “In many countries, such as the United States, this is a significant improvement over legal requirements and practices of multinational peers.”

    “This new approach,” Jacques added, “reflects our values as a company, particularly our focus on the well-being of our people and improving the diversity of our workforce. To attract and retain the best people, we need to provide a work environment that supports all families and offers new parents flexibility regarding early childcare choices.”

    The benefit is available to full-time employees and others on fixed-term contracts. The policy goes into effect for Kennecott employees on Oct. 1 and will be phased in next year across the globe, “in accordance with relevant laws and regulations,” Jacques said.

    Tribune Editorial: Trust the courts, not the lobbyists.


    Some Utah lawmakers voted Wednesday to encourage Utah courts to stop a new screening process meant to identify a defendant’s “background information, failure-to-appear records and history of violent offenses.” When prosecutors charge a person with...

    Some Utah lawmakers voted Wednesday to encourage Utah courts to stop a new screening process meant to identify a defendant’s “background information, failure-to-appear records and history of violent offenses.”

    When prosecutors charge a person with a crime, the judge can order pretrial release, bail or pretrial detention. Judges use bail and pretrial detention to protect public safety and ensure that defendants appear for court proceedings.

    The judiciary’s plan is to give judges more background information on each defendant in a criminal case, not just the new charges filed against them, so the court will have a better grasp of who needs to be held and who poses little enough threat to the community that they can be released pending trial.

    In a legislative committee hearing on Wednesday, Rep. Paul Ray told the committee that the court should have come to the Legislature before considering such a “dramatic policy change.”

    In case Ray needs a reminder, Utah’s Constitution entrusts the court with its own administration. “The Supreme Court shall adopt rules of procedure and evidence to be used in the courts of the state.”

    Besides that fact, the court’s reforms are no surprise. It is disingenuous for Rep. Ray to suggest the Legislature did not know the court was planning these reforms.

    In his report to the Utah Legislature in January, Utah Chief Justice Matthew Durrant told the Legislature he was concerned about Utah’s current bail system, especially regarding defendants who could not pay bail. He noted that pretrial detention “means separation from their family and often a loss of their employment, with the accompanying loss of income.”

    The Legislature’s own auditor general, noting that the “pretrial landscape is changing,” released a report in January that concluded that “pretrial release decisions are made without adequate information.” The auditor reported that judges “lack basic information when making pretrial release decisions” and that lack of information “negatively impacts public safety, taxpayer resources, and defendant outcomes.”

    In addition, the court published a report in November 2015 after extensively reviewing pretrial release practices. In its report, a court committee found, “Utah’s laws discourage judges from exercising discretion to make individualized decisions regarding pretrial release.” “Judges are not given the information they need when making a pretrial release or monetary bail decision.”

    The court’s report concluded, “There should be a presumption in favor of pretrial release, free from financial conditions.”

    In other words, the court signaled in 2015 that it would be moving toward a system that preferred pretrial release over money bail requirements based on the level of offense. Such system will be a fairer way to treat individuals while calculating actual risk.

    The Legislature has made great strides in showing its willingness to reform the criminal justice system. The Legislature should continue these efforts, even in the face of alarm from lobbyists with clients worried about losing money.

    The executive director for the American Bail Coalition warned legislators about a more-detailed charging report, saying, “The biggest problem is that it never recommends bail. It always recommends release.”

    Exactly.


    Kim Jong Un: 'Deranged' Trump will 'pay dearly' for threat


    United Nations • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un called President Donald Trump “deranged” and said in a statement carried by the state news agency that he will “pay dearly” for his threats.Kim said that Trump is “unfit to hold the prerogative...

    United Nations • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un called President Donald Trump “deranged” and said in a statement carried by the state news agency that he will “pay dearly” for his threats.

    Kim said that Trump is “unfit to hold the prerogative of supreme command of a country.” He also described the president as “a rogue and a gangster fond of playing with fire.”

    “I will make the man holding the prerogative of the supreme command in the U.S. pay dearly for his speech calling for totally destroying the DPRK,” said the statement carried by North’s official Korean Central News Agency in a dispatch issued from Pyongyang on Friday morning.

    DPRK is the abbreviation of the communist country’s official name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

    The statement responded to Trump’s combative speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday where he mocked Kim as a “Rocket Man” on a “suicide mission,” and said that if “forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.”

    Kim characterized Trump’s speech to the world body as “mentally deranged behavior.”

    He said Trump’s remarks “have convinced me, rather than frightening or stopping me, that the path I chose is correct and that it is the one I have to follow to the last.”

    Kim said he is “thinking hard” about his response and that Trump “will face results beyond his expectation.”

    It is unusual for the North Korean leader to issue such a statement in his own name. It will further escalate the war of words between the adversaries as the North moves closer to perfecting a nuclear-tipped missile that could strike America.

    In recent months, the North has launched a pair of intercontinental missiles believed capable of striking the continental United States and another pair that soared over Japanese territory. Earlier this month, North Korea conducted its most powerful nuclear test to date drawing stiffer U.N. sanctions.


    Federal audit: Utah-based Western Governors University should repay more than $700 million in financial aid


    Western Governors University may have to write a $712 million check to the federal government, based on recommendations in an audit report that says the online school’s offerings are “correspondence courses.” Released Thursday, the report by the...

    Western Governors University may have to write a $712 million check to the federal government, based on recommendations in an audit report that says the online school’s offerings are “correspondence courses.”

    Released Thursday, the report by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General has found that most courses within WGU’s largest degree programs fall short of financial aid eligibility under Title IV of the Higher Education Act — and recommends the repayment of $712,670,616 awarded to students since July 2014.

    “None of these 69 courses [out of 102] could reasonably be considered as providing regular and substantive interaction between students and instructors,” the report states. 

    At issue is the legal distinction between correspondence courses and WGU’s “distance education” model, which under the Higher Education Act requires student and faculty interaction to be enabled by technology.

    The audit reviewed the school’s operations between July 2014 and June 2016. In addition to the roughly $713 million repayment, auditors also recommend that the Education Department’s chief operating officer for federal student aid determine whether WGU violated regulations prior to July 2014, which could lead to additional penalties against the university.

    WGU spokeswoman Joan Mitchell said Thursday that the report does not impose binding sanctions on the university.

    “It’s a recommendation from the Office of the Inspector General, who has no enforcement authority,” Mitchell said.

    Moreover, according to Scott Pulsipher, president of the Utah-based university, the findings are based in a misinterpretation and narrow application of federal law.

    “Obviosly we very much disagree with their opinion and perspective on these things,” Pulsipher said.

    WGU’s model enrolls students in a full degree program rather than a series of individual classes, Pulsipher said, with a team of curriculum writers, mentors and instructors taking the place of a lone professor leading a course.

    The school’s structure does not fit traditional molds, Pulsipher said, but WGU remains fully accredited and has long enjoyed bipartisan support since its founding in 1997 by 19 U.S. governors, including then-Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt.

    “We have every expectation that this will be resolved favorably for WGU,” Pulsipher said, “and that we’ll continue to be able to innovate on behalf of our students.”

    Following the release of the audit report, U.S. Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, tweeted that he was confident the Office of Inspector General’s recommendations would be rejected by the U.S. Department of Education. 

    I am fully confident the Education Department will reject this Education Department OIG report: https://t.co/srttZs20jS

    — Mike Lee (@SenMikeLee) September 21, 2017

    Lee’s spokesman, Conn Carroll, reiterated the senator’s support of WGU.

    “Sen. Lee has every confidence that the Department of Education will see the true value that Western Governors University provides students,” Caroll told The Salt Lake Tribune, “despite antiquated and misinterpreted federal regulations.”


    The report also dinged WGU for failing to meet minimum instructional time requirements for course participation and for inaccurately calculating repayments of financial aid after students withdrew from the school. 

    “One student never attended during the payment period,” the report states. “But the school did not return any Title IV funds.”

    Pulsipher denied those claims as well, saying a range of recommendations offered by federal auditors stemmed from a similar misreading of the Higher Education Act’s intentions.

    Western Governors University operates on a so-called “competency-based education” model, in which students are awarded credit based on mastery of course content instead of completion of a specified term.

    “We would reject any of their opinions,” Pulsipher said. “They have their perspective and just because they have one doesn’t mean its right. We are supremely confident in our model.”

    WGU posted a video response to the audit on the school’s web page, including a video from Pulsipher assuring students that their financial aid and the school’s accreditation remain intact.

    BYU + Coke = tons of jokes


    It’s probably the biggest soda-related news you’ll hear this week.The Thursday announcement that Brigham Young University will begin offering caffeinated sodas on campus hit the internet like a gush of Mentos-laced Diet Coke, with reactions from...

    It’s probably the biggest soda-related news you’ll hear this week.

    The Thursday announcement that Brigham Young University will begin offering caffeinated sodas on campus hit the internet like a gush of Mentos-laced Diet Coke, with reactions from lawmakers, national journalists and regular jokesters.

    Here are some of the best reactions to the change.

    If this doesn't fix the offense, I'm not sure anything will. https://t.co/fPb40BxhBE

    — Spencer Cox (@SpencerJCox) September 21, 2017

    I hate the Coke cans with the names on them, but if there's one that says "Brigham," I will 'gram it so fast your head will spin

    — Hunter Schwarz (@hunterschwarz) September 21, 2017

    G A T E W A Y. D R U G Z

    — TYLER_GLENN (@tylerinacoma) September 21, 2017

    The big question is: will BYU be allowed to prepare your caffeinated drink in full view, or only from behind the Honor Curtain?

    — nathanmills (@nathanmills) September 21, 2017

    The school’s athletic director already sounds caffeinated:

    Go Cougs! https://t.co/OK6E0RsPM6

    — Tom Holmoe (@TomHolmoe) September 21, 2017

    President Worthen: “Now if you’re going to drink I’d rather you do it on campus... I’m not like a regular president, I’m a cool president” pic.twitter.com/24FOQAmB9x

    — Taylor Southwick (@tsouthwick21) September 21, 2017

    Even the University of Utah — which has a relationship with Pepsi — chimed in:

    So now you have red cans and we have blue cans? What a crazy, mixed-up world we live in.#BottomsUpBYU https://t.co/lxMeLhYytP

    — University of Utah (@UUtah) September 21, 2017

    Signs that the world really could end on Saturday: Storms, earthquakes, rumors of war and BYU selling caffeinated soda on campus.

    — Daniel Burke (@BurkeCNN) September 21, 2017

    He later clarified that this is sarcasm, but it didn’t stop his mentions from blowing up:

    this is disappointing. Caffeine free soda is what makes BYU what it is. I'm sad people are so happy to see them stray from their culture

    — D.A.R.E Grad (@okelleykm) September 21, 2017

    Photographic evidence:

    It's official! #BYU has caffeinated soda on campus!! #CocaCola pic.twitter.com/psO3lcCpnR

    — Joshua J. Ellis (@jellis9) September 21, 2017

    President Worthen on BYU serving caffeine, "figured we all needed a hard one after losing 7 straight to Utah"

    — Weston Farnsworth (@CKS_4) September 21, 2017

    Actually, caffeinated soda has been on campus for decades. You just got to know where to look -- faculty mini fridges. https://t.co/WiirOvWyv0

    — The BYU Buzz (@thebyubuzz) September 21, 2017

    BYU is now selling caffeinated soda on campus. Are the five star recruits inevitable now? MY COLUMN: https://t.co/VpdjENxrRp

    — Matt Brown (@MattSBN) September 21, 2017

    Right now at BYU, there’s a serious prayerful discussion re: which “Dirty Soda” provider to have in the CougarEat & LaVell Edwards Stadium.

    — Jake Black (@jakeboyslim) September 21, 2017

    NK fires missiles over Japan. We do nothing. Putin invades Ukraine No responce. BYU sells coke. I can't remain silent.The madness has to end

    — Rep. Chris Stewart (@RepChrisStewart) September 21, 2017

    Gun lobby complaints fail to stop hike in concealed-weapons permit fee


    Legislators have taken a first step to write into law a $20 hike in fees to obtain a concealed weapons permit — which gun enthusiasts say state administrators imposed illegally last month and continue to charge despite dubious authority.The bill...

    Legislators have taken a first step to write into law a $20 hike in fees to obtain a concealed weapons permit — which gun enthusiasts say state administrators imposed illegally last month and continue to charge despite dubious authority.

    The bill approved in committee this week would raise fees for permit renewals, not just original applications.

    The National Rifle Association and the Utah Shooting Sports Council are both crying foul, contending previous lower fees not only covered the costs of the concealed-carry permit program but also generated an $800,000 surplus — so the extra fees are unneeded.

    “If they need the money, they need the money. But they have got to show it and do it by the right process and include some transparency,” said Clark Aposhian, president of the Utah Shooting Sports Council.

    The controversial fee hikes were attached to a bill that is renewing a three-year effort to raise driver license fees, and was endorsed this week by the Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Interim Committee.

    No one showed up to fight the driver license fee hikes in committee, but the gun groups testified against the concealed-weapons permit fees.

    That comes after the Bureau of Criminal Identification on Aug. 1 raised the overall cost of several fees to obtain a first-time concealed weapons permit to $57 for Utah residents and $67 for out-of-staters. Nearly two-thirds of those with Utah permits live outside the state.

    Gun groups complained that fees are set by law, and BCI did not have the power to hike them on its own. The Legislature’s Administrative Rules Review Committee last month summoned BCI to the Capitol to explain its action.

    Several lawmakers at the hearing said BCI may have overstepped its bounds. But the committee lacked a quorum to vote on the matter.

    BCI officials contended they did have proper authority from a 2015 bill that allowed charging $20 to any “non-criminal justice” applicants for some background checks. However, some lawmakers who listened to tapes of debate on that bill say it clearly was intended only to be charged to educators, not other groups.

    The new bill would give explicit authority to charge that fee to groups besides educators, including people applying for concealed-weapons permits.

    Aposhian said seeking that change “shows it isn’t in the law now, but they are still charging the higher fee.”

    Sen. Daniel Thatcher, R-West Valley City, sponsor of the bill, said the change is sought to remove any questions about legality of the fee.

    Joseph Brown, finance director for the Department of Public Safety, told the committee that fees for the concealed weapons permit had — as gun groups claimed — produced a surplus $800,000 that is being held in a restricted account.

    But he said projections show that without increases, fees will not cover costs in coming years — and that the restricted account likely would be drawn down to cover shortfalls. Thatcher said ensuring that fees cover costs is the main reason he is running the bill.

    One reason revenues from concealed-weapons permits are projected to decrease is that more renewals are expected, along with fewer first-time applications, Brown said. The state has charged lower fees for renewals, but Brown said they require just as much administrative work.

    So the bill would increase renewal fees to the same level as first-time applications. Aposhian contends renewals, handled with brief online applications, do not require as much work — and said state officials told him that previously.

    Brian Judy, Utah liaison for NRA, also criticized the bill in the committee. He asked that the concealed-weapons permit fees be handled in a separate bill from driver-license fee hikes to permit more direct focus on whether they are justified.

    The combined bill also proposes to increase the cost to renew a regular Utah driver license from $25 to $32 to help cover administrative costs.

    Among other proposed fee hikes in the bill are:

    • Original provisional driver license application: $39, up from $30.

    • Learner permit application: $19, up from $15.

    • Motorcycle endorsement: $11, up from $9.50.

    • Renewal of a regular Class D license for people age 65 and older: $17, up from $13.

    • An identification card: $23, up from $18.

    • An original application for commercial driver license: $52, up from $40, and the skills test would be $78, up from $60.

    • Each original or renewal commercial driver license endorsement for passengers, hazardous material, double or triple trailers, or tankers: $9, up from $7.

    • A license reinstatement application for an alcohol or drug offense: $45, up from $35.

    • Administrative fee for license reinstatement after an alcohol or drug offense: $255, up from $230.

    Vote to halt bail changes in Utah passes after all, but courts plan to move forward


    After some confusion about legislative interim rules, it turns out a Utah lawmaker’s motion to encourage the courts to halt bail changes actually passed — but court officials say they’re planning to move forward with the new system anyway.State...

    After some confusion about legislative interim rules, it turns out a Utah lawmaker’s motion to encourage the courts to halt bail changes actually passed — but court officials say they’re planning to move forward with the new system anyway.

    State courts are preparing to implement a new screening process for bail in November that will give judges more information about defendants in deciding if they will need to post bail — and how much — to get out of jail.

    But Rep. Paul Ray, R-Clearfield, expressed concern Wednesday during a Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Interim Committee hearing, saying the courts should have come to legislators first before considering such a “dramatic policy change.”

    Ray asked the committee on Wednesday to “strongly recommend to the courts to hold off on any implementation” until state lawmakers can take a look at it. But the reception from fellow legislators was lukewarm. While the motion had enough support from House members, it tied among senators.

    After some discussion Wednesday, lawmakers reviewed committee rules and clearly announced the motion failed. But after additional review, Ray late Wednesday said in an email to The Salt Lake Tribune that the measure actually passed.

    “It needed a tie in one body and a majority in the other,” he wrote.

    But court officials said Thursday that their plans are unchanged, and they’ll move forward with the changes in November despite the lawmakers’ request.

    “The Utah Courts has always been committed to examining pre-trial issues,” spokesman Geoff Fattah said in a statement, “and there will be future ongoing discussions after implementation involving stakeholders.”

    Fattah noted that the courts have been getting mixed signals from the legislature: A January 2017 legislative audit strongly encouraged these changes, and now lawmakers are asking for the opposite. He said the tool will be studied in Davis, Beaver and Utah counties after it’s implemented to test its effectiveness.

    During Wednesday’s hearing, several from the bail-bondsman industry warned lawmakers that with the new protocol, jails will become revolving doors for criminals. But those in support of bail reform countered, saying the changes will assess actual risk to the public and not just release those who can afford to pay.

    Wayne Carlos, with the Utah Association of Professional Bondsmen and Agents, told the legislative committee that people should be wary of trusting those who have already violated the “public’s trust” by committing a crime. He questioned the worth of promises from such people to show up in court without the risk of forfeiting bail.

    Former U.S. Attorney for Utah Brett Tolman spoke in favor the changes Wednesday, saying public safety should not be based solely on the whether someone has the money to get out of jail. On Thursday, Tolman said in a statement to The Tribune that the new system has overwhelming support from Utah judges — and noted the lawmakers’ efforts have no binding impact on the courts.

    “The bail bondsmen may have money and political influence,” he said, “but the facts support implementing a system where individuals accused of violent crimes cannot just purchase their freedom. … I expect implementation will move forward as planned.”

    The Utah Judicial Council approved the new bail process in January, with a start date of Nov. 13. According to court officials, the new program will give judges an automated report on a defendant, which will include his or her background information, failure-to-appear records and history of violent offenses. The judge can then decide a bail amount — or perhaps release a defendant without the requirement of posting bail. Previously, judges have most often relied only on probable cause statements filed by an arresting officer when making decisions on bail amounts.

    Jeff Clayton, executive director for the American Bail Coalition, told legislators that the automated reports are almost always too lenient.

    “The biggest problem is that it never recommends bail,” Clayton said. “It always recommends release.”

    According to 2013 data gathered by Measures for Justice, 43 percent of Utah’s inmates remain in jail with pending cases. In Salt Lake County, 60 percent of inmates in December 2013 — the most recent data available — were being held pretrial.

    Utah volleyball opens Pac-12 play at home with No. 25 Colorado


    The Pac-12 gauntlet begins this weekend at home for the nationally ranked Utah volleyball team.The 16th-ranked Utes (9-2) begin their Pac-12 slate against No. 25 Colorado (10-1) at 7 p.m. Friday at the Jon M. Hunstman Center, then host California at 2...

    The Pac-12 gauntlet begins this weekend at home for the nationally ranked Utah volleyball team.

    The 16th-ranked Utes (9-2) begin their Pac-12 slate against No. 25 Colorado (10-1) at 7 p.m. Friday at the Jon M. Hunstman Center, then host California at 2 p.m. Sunday.

    Utah has won eight of its past nine matches, with the lone loss in five games to rival BYU. Utah and Colorado are two of seven Pac-12 teams ranked nationally along with No. 4 Stanford, No. 7 Washington, No. 8 Oregon, No. 11 UCLA and No. 21 USC.

    “What is it going to take to get up into maybe that top third of the conference versus that middle third? Boy, it’s a fine line,” Utes coach Beth Launiere said. “I’m not going to lie. We actually talked about this as a team. There’s just not one bad team in this conference, so I think we have to get better. We dropped a couple matches against teams we have to beat in the Pac-12, those type of teams.”

    The Utes rank among the nation’s top 10 teams in assists (seventh, 13.8 per set) and hitting percentage (eighth, .302). Three Utes have averaged at least 1.00 block per set. Senior middle blocker Tawnee Luafalemana leads the team with 1.29 blocks per set, while junior Berkeley Oblad (1.07 blocks) and freshman Dani Barton (1.03) aren’t far behind.

    Utah might play this weekend without senior outside hitter Adora Anae, an American Volleyball Coaches Association All-America selection last season. Anae injured her ankle against BYU and did not play in last weekend’s match against Utah Valley. Her availability likely won’t be determined until Friday.

    Senior middle blocker Tawnee Luafalemana, who had a career-high 18 kills against UVU, said the Utes’ main focus this season has been to create a “championship mentality.”

    “It’s just everybody wanting to win, wanting to push that much more — because we know we can do it, and we know we’re ranked for a reason — and to believe in each other,” Luafalemana said. “I feel like the group we have now, especially with our freshmen [who] are amazing, we have such a deep bench now. Because we know that, I feel like we’re way more confident now.”

    Facebook to release Russia ads to Congress amid pressure


    New York • Facebook will provide the contents of 3,000 ads bought by a Russian agency to congressional investigators, bowing to pressure that it be more forthcoming with information that could shed light on possible interference in the 2016...

    New York • Facebook will provide the contents of 3,000 ads bought by a Russian agency to congressional investigators, bowing to pressure that it be more forthcoming with information that could shed light on possible interference in the 2016 presidential election.

    The social media giant also said it will make political advertising on its platform more “transparent.” It will require ads to disclose who paid for them and what other ads they are running at the same time. That’s key, because political ads on social media may look different depending on who they’re targeted at, a tactic designed to improve their effectiveness.

    The moves Thursday come amid growing pressure on the social network from members of Congress, who pushed Facebook to release the ads. Facebook has already handed over the ads to the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company is “actively working” with the U.S. government in its ongoing Russia investigations. Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post and live video on Thursday that he has directed his team to provide the ads, created by fake accounts linked to Russia, to Congress.

    Facebook’s transparency measures are also important. Currently, there’s no way for outsiders to track political ads or for recipients to tell who is sponsoring such messages.

    The company will hire 250 more people in the next year to work on “election integrity,” Zuckerberg said.

    Zuckerberg hinted that the company may not provide much information publicly, saying that the ongoing federal investigation will limit what he can reveal.

    “As a general rule, we are limited in what we can discuss publicly about law enforcement investigations, so we may not always be able to share our findings publicly,” he said.

    The nonpartisan Campaign Legal Center stressed again on Thursday that the company should make the ads public, “so that everyone can see the nature and extent of the use of Facebook accounts by Russia.”

    The leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee have been seeking to bring Facebook executives before their committee since the company first revealed the existence of the ads two weeks ago. But critics say Facebook should go further. They say the company should tell its users how they might have been influenced by outside meddlers.

    Zuckerberg did warn that Facebook can’t catch all undesirable material before it hits its social network.

    “I’m not going to sit here and tell you we’re going to catch all bad content in our system. We don’t check what people say before they say it, and frankly, I don’t think our society should want us to,” Zuckerberg said. “If you break our community standards or the law, then you’re going to face consequences afterwards.”

    He added: “We won’t catch everyone immediately, but we can make it harder to try to interfere.”

    Zuckerberg’s move came a day after Twitter confirmed that it will meet next week with staff of the Senate Intelligence Committee, which has been scrutinizing the spread of false news stories and propaganda on social media during the election. The committee’s top Democrat, Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, had said the committee wanted to hear from Twitter to learn more about the use of fake accounts and bot networks to spread misinformation.

    “Twitter deeply respects the integrity of the election process, a cornerstone of all democracies, and will continue to strengthen our platform against bots and other forms of manipulation that violate our Terms of Service,” the company said in a statement.


    Utah Rep. Chris Stewart tweets, then deletes post about liberals wetting their pants over Trump speech


    Washington • Rep. Chris Stewart poked fun at liberals in a tweet this week about their reaction to President Donald Trump’s speech to the United Nations — but then quickly deleted the post.“Laughing,” Stewart tweeted. “Liberals going nuts...

    Washington • Rep. Chris Stewart poked fun at liberals in a tweet this week about their reaction to President Donald Trump’s speech to the United Nations — but then quickly deleted the post.

    “Laughing,” Stewart tweeted. “Liberals going nuts after prez UN speech. His idea = defend freedom. Their respond = drink 18 glasses of water and wet pants.”

    Trump’s speech, in which he called North Korea’s Kim Jong Un “Rocket Man” and declared that he would “totally destroy” the country if it continued its nuclear missile program, was roundly criticized by the left but welcomed by the right.

    Stewart has more than 11,500 followers on Twitter.

    Stewart’s office did not respond to a request for comment. Stewart’s Twitter feed offered no explanation about the deleted tweet.

    ProPublica, which tracks deleted tweets from politicians, captured the tweet on its Politiwoops page.

    Station Park: Re-energizing Retail through Placemaking

    Station Park: Re-energizing Retail through Placemaking


    Is it a buzzword, or is it real? The short answer is, yes, placemaking is real; it is predicated on the idea that if you provide positive encounters, people will continue to come back for new experiences. Take Station Park in Farmington as a prime...

    Is it a buzzword, or is it real? The short answer is, yes, placemaking is real; it is predicated on the idea that if you provide positive encounters, people will continue to come back for new experiences. Take Station Park in Farmington as a prime example of successful placemaking—with more than 125 retail, dining, service and entertainment partners, along with beautiful public spaces and a full office facility, people can literally spend their entire day at the complex.

    Station Park brings people together in a variety of ways, with offerings that include relaxed and formal gathering spaces, event locations for business or family meetings and parties, outdoor events like open air concerts, along with a wide range of shopping, dining and entertainment options. Hyatt Place is situated at the northern part of Station Park and features 108 guest rooms, many offering breathtaking views of the surrounding mountains. The Hyatt Place library, located just off the lobby, is a place for guests to relax and connect with each other and take in the abundant mountain views from the attached outdoor deck. The hotel’s indoor swimming pool completes and complements Hyatt Place’s placemaking with soft lounge chairs and an over-sized hot tub.

    In earlier generations, members of the community gathered in designated public spaces such as parks and recreation centers, mirroring some of the earliest placemaking. Now, with public spaces being lost to residential and commercial development, there is a new and important place for locations like Station Park and its community gathering spaces. Station Park has a full schedule of activities and events, all year round. The Fountain View Event Venue is a sophisticated space for weddings, business events, meetings and parties. This spacious, second-story event venue includes all of the event essentials and an unmatched urban opulence.

    Station Park provides numerous life enriching experiences for residents and upholds eco-friendly values for the good of the neighborhood and earth. With a mixed-use development that includes office, retail and public gathering spaces, Davis and Weber County communities benefit from minimized driving times, diminished pollution, convenient services and more. Having both work and play at a one-stop destination has a positive impact on the busy schedules of local families.

    Leonid Bershidsky: Why Merkel is winning without a bold vision

    Leonid Bershidsky: Why Merkel is winning without a bold vision


    German Chancellor Angela Merkel is often accused of refusing to lead. Many inside and outside her country would like her to be the leader of the free world, to suggest bold concepts and make decisive moves. But there’s a strong, very German philosophy...

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel is often accused of refusing to lead. Many inside and outside her country would like her to be the leader of the free world, to suggest bold concepts and make decisive moves. But there’s a strong, very German philosophy to Merkel’s lack of vision, and that, as much as Germany’s economic prosperity, is winning her the Sept. 24 election.

    “Whoever has visions should go see a doctor,” Helmut Schmidt, a revered German chancellor, said in 1980, though he later described the phrase as “pompous.” It can be argued that postwar German leaders, despite their country’s reduced global standing, often had grand visions. Schmidt himself dreamed of a nuke-free world. Willy Brandt thought he’d figured out peaceful coexistence with the Communist world. Helmut Kohl worked tirelessly toward German reunification. Merkel has had her visionary moments, too, with Germany’s determined move to non-nuclear sustainable energy and with the decision to let in more than a million asylum seekers in 2015. But in the 2017 campaign, Merkel appeared to act out Schmidt’s maxim. She offered no bold scenario for the future, no aspirational goal.

    Perhaps the closest she came to setting out a vision was a year ago, as she presented this year’s budget in parliament. Germany, she said, has seen a lot of change since World War II, and “change isn’t a bad thing.” But she also vowed to defend the status quo in the broadest sense of the term: “Germany will remain Germany, with all that we love and hold dear about it.”

    This promise was made at the height of the country’s panic about the mass immigration. But it reflected a more complicated conviction: In Germany, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Merkel seized upon that feeling for her campaign slogan, too: “For a Germany in which we live well and love living.” The campaign was fueled by an uncharacteristic nationalism. Unlike in previous elections, Merkel’s Christian Democratic Party used the colors of the German flag in election posters. Merkel and another prominent CDU politician, Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere, published their takes on the German identity in the nation’s most popular tabloid, Bild. It’s tempting to write this off as a tactical move meant to prevent the far-right party, Alternative for Germany, from occupying the nationalist ground. But Merkel bases her take on identity politics in a strikingly different way.

    The AfD’s version of patriotism is closely related to the notion of Vaterland, which students of the German national identity Elizabeth Boa and Rachel Palfreyman described as the masculine idea of homeland, the country for which soldiers die in a foreign field. “Courage for Germany” is one of the party’s slogans. One of the AfD’s lead candidates, Alexander Gauland, recently asserted a “right to be proud of the achievements of German soldiers in the two world wars.” The AfD faithful are tired of being ashamed of their country’s past and want to see it as heroic. It’s hardly by chance that AfD voting in recent regional elections follows the same geographical pattern as voting for the National Socialists; while the AfD is not their direct heir, it shares with earlier nationalists a vision of German greatness based on assertiveness.

    But the “stunning historical persistence” noted by researchers Davide Cantonmi, Felix Hagemeister and Mark Westscott in the AfD voting patterns speaks to Merkel’s point: The more things change, the more they stay the same. Merkel’s subtle counterweight to the Vaterland patriotism of the AfD is what Boa and Palfreyman interpreted as the feminine version of German identity, Heimat, the nurturing place one calls home.

    Merkel doesn’t use the word in speeches: It became tainted during the Nazi era, when the official propaganda equated it to Vaterland. But the way she sees Germany is in line with that notion. That’s obvious from the ABC of all things German she published in Bild. Heimat is deeply regional and local (the Nazis misused the term when they applied it to the country as a whole), and Merkel’s list is full of the joys of local life -- regional festivals, small-town newspapers, garden plots. The flag, the military and the constitution are there, too -- how could they not be -- but most of the list consists of what makes Germany a place of comfort. The original philosophy of the Heimat notion, developed in the 1920s (before it got commingled with ethnic nationalism) allowed for people to find a new Heimat to embrace in a deeply personal way. That’s an important part of the CDU approach to immigration: Newcomers are supposed to accept the German Leitkultur, or “leading culture.”

    The consensus about the current election campaign is that Merkel ran it in a minimalist style to avoid obvious errors, hoping to coast to victory on the tide of good feelings about the economy. There’s a lot of truth to that. If you ask Germans whether there is a local version of the American dream, they may refer self-deprecatingly to an old ad for the Sparkasse, the network of savings banks: “My house. My car. My boat. My wife.” But there’s a non-economic side to this desire for comfort -- the pride in the land that provides it. Merkel made a subtle appeal to a different version of German patriotism than the one espoused by AfD. It’s conservative and seemingly unambitious, but if it were otherwise, it probably would not have been such a perfect alternative to the radicalism of the far right.

    In her quiet way, Merkel is winning an ideological battle, not just exploiting prosperity. It may not mean much for the outside world, but it’s important domestically. Bold vision would have gotten in the way this year. There will be time for it later.


    - Bershidsky is a Bloomberg View columnist. He was the founding editor of the Russian business daily Vedomosti and founded the opinion website Slon.ru.

    For more columns from Bloomberg View, visit http://www.bloomberg.com/view.


    Wistful ‘Brad’s Status’ puts Ben Stiller in midlife mode, again


    Attention, all white men between 40 and 60: You can cancel your midlife crisis, because Ben Stiller will have it for you.Through “Greenberg” (2010), “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” (2013) and “While We’re Young” (2014), Stiller has been...

    Attention, all white men between 40 and 60: You can cancel your midlife crisis, because Ben Stiller will have it for you.

    Through “Greenberg” (2010), “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” (2013) and “While We’re Young” (2014), Stiller has been the poster child for rethinking one’s life choices and contemplating a radical change. And in “Brad’s Status,” writer-director Mike White takes him through the most navel-gazing trip of all.

    Stiller’s character, Brad Sloan, is on a trip of rediscovery, but it’s not supposed to be his trip. He’s accompanying his 17-year-old son, Troy (Austin Abrams), who’s scoping out colleges in the Boston area. Brad tries to reassure Troy that it’s OK if he doesn’t get into his first choice — after all, Brad got waitlisted at Yale, but got a great education from Tufts. His ego is dented when Troy informs him he’s aiming for Harvard and that his counselor thinks he can get into any school he wants.

    Despite a request from his wife, Melanie (Jenna Fischer), that he “be present” for Troy, Brad finds his thoughts wandering to himself. He looks at his life as the head of a small nonprofit in Sacramento and sees how his college friends surpassed him on the success ladder.

    Billy (Jemaine Clement) sold his tech company at 40 and retired to Maui. Jason (Luke Wilson) is a hedge-fund billionaire with a private plane. Nick (played by White) is a successful director in Hollywood, recently married to his husband — a wedding to which Brad was not invited. And Craig (Michael Sheen) is a former White House aide who writes best-selling books and is a cable-news pundit.

    As Brad attempts to boost his perceived status, particularly in Troy’s eyes, the results are awkward — whether it’s upgrading their airline seats or trying to finagle a rescheduled interview appointment at Harvard’s admissions department. Trying to call in a favor from Craig makes Brad feel even smaller.

    White (whose screenplays include “School of Rock” and this year’s “Beatriz at Dinner”) uses his dry-to-parched humor to let Brad wallow in his self-loathing for a solid hour. Much of the movie is an internal monologue, an incessant voiceover illustrated with Brad’s idea of the life his old school chums must be having without him.

    His lament goes on until White finally calls him on his bullcrap in the form of Troy’s friend Ananya (Shazi Raja), an Indian-American Harvard music student. Ananya listens to Brad’s complaints and shuts him down: “You’re really lucky. You’re 50 years old and you still think the world was made for you.”

    Brad’s inevitable epiphany is still a good 20 minutes away, but Ananya’s monologue essentially gives away the game. Stories like this, where the semi-prosperous white male laments that things aren’t better in his life, are refuges of privilege, pity parties for characters who, as Ananya puts it, “have enough.” After “Brad’s Status,” one hopes the movies have had enough of self-absorbed men at midlife.

    * * 1/2
    Brad’s Status
    Ben Stiller plays a dad, going through midlife questions while accompanying his teen son on his college tour, in this uneven comedy.
    Where • Theaters everywhere.
    When • Opens Friday, Sept. 22.
    Rating • R for language.
    Running time • 101 minutes.

    ‘Kingsman’ sequel lacks the sharp edge of the first movie


    When “Kingsman: The Secret Service” exploded in theaters in 2014, it was a welcome surprise: a smart and scathingly funny spy comedy, with one outlandishly jaw-dropping set piece after another.Now comes the sequel, “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,”...

    When “Kingsman: The Secret Service” exploded in theaters in 2014, it was a welcome surprise: a smart and scathingly funny spy comedy, with one outlandishly jaw-dropping set piece after another.

    Now comes the sequel, “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” and another surprise: that a premise so ripe with possibilities has devolved so quickly into a mess like this.

    Director Matthew Vaughn and writing partner Jane Goldman return with a sequel that tries desperately to rebottle the wow factor that made the first “Kingsman” so bubbly. They fail utterly, piling on an idiotic storyline, lackluster action and an array of stars who are given less screen time than Fox’s marketing department would have you believe.

    Our hero Eggsy Unwin (Taron Egerton) is back, looking as dapper as his mentor Harry Hart (Colin Firth), who left the last movie with a bullet through his eyeball. He’s on his way to see his girlfriend — Tilde (Hanna Alström), the Swedish princess he rescued in the last movie — when he’s ambushed by Charlie Keltner (Edward Holcroft), a failed Kingsman recruit who’s now sporting a robotic arm and a mysterious 24-karat gold tattoo.

    The tattoo, the audience learns, is the mark given to henchmen of the world’s most successful drug lord, Poppy (Julianne Moore). She rules her domain from a hidden Cambodian ruin that she’s renovated into a ’50s-themed wonderland, complete with diner, bowling alley, and concert hall where a kidnapped Elton John performs nightly.

    Poppy orders a missile strike that wipes out all of the Kingsman agents and the tailor-shop headquarters, leaving alive only Eggsy and the agency’s tech genius, Merlin (Mark Strong). Eggsy and Merlin deploy the “doomsday protocol,” which leads them to the agency’s yee-haw American cousins, called Statesman.

    That’s how Eggsy and Merlin land at a Kentucky whiskey distillery, the cover for Statesman’s well-financed operations. They are greeted with suspicion by Agent Tequila (Channing Tatum), but then welcomed by the agency’s boss, Champ (Jeff Bridges), and Merlin’s gadget-savvy counterpart, Ginger Ale (Halle Berry). It’s Ginger Ale who introduces the British spies to the man they have confined in a padded cell: Harry, who has no memory of his life as a Kingsman.

    While Eggsy and Merlin try to figure out how to reboot Harry’s memory, they and the Statesman agents also must decipher Poppy’s evil plan for world conquest. Without getting into details, it may be the dumbest plan by an evil villain since the last “Austin Powers” movie.

    Vaughn still can toss together an imaginative action sequence, and the opener in a speeding London cab (to the tune of Prince’s “Let’s Go Crazy”) is a cracker. But other bits lack the flash and audacity of the first movie’s signature moves (like the Baptist church free-for-all, or the fireworks display of exploding heads).

    Then there’s the bait-and-switch of casting big stars, like Bridges and Berry, for glorified cameos. If you saw the movie’s poster, you’d think Tatum and Egerton were co-leads, but Tatum has less screen time than Elton John.

    Worst of all, Vaughn and Goldman want Eggsy to be motivated by the death of beloved supporting characters — but at the same time, by resurrecting Harry as if he were Jon Snow, they treat death as if it’s no big deal. The emotional balance is all out of whack, leaving “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” stuck in a no-man’s-land between sarcasm and sincerity.

    * *
    Kingsman: The Golden Circle
    The British secret agents meet their American cousins in this hopeless mishmash of a sequel.
    Where • Theaters everywhere.
    When • Opens Friday, Sept. 22.
    Rating • R for sequences of strong violence, drug content, language throughout and some sexual material.
    Running time • 141 minutes.

    The Tower in Salt Lake City turns Art House Theater Day into a whole weekend of events


    Independent movie theaters across America are joining forces Sunday for Art House Theater Day — and one Utah theater is making a weekend of it.Art House Theater Day follows the model of similar events — Free Comic Book Day or National Record Store...

    Independent movie theaters across America are joining forces Sunday for Art House Theater Day — and one Utah theater is making a weekend of it.

    Art House Theater Day follows the model of similar events — Free Comic Book Day or National Record Store Day, to name two — to draw attention to the mission of independent movie exhibitors that show out-of-the-mainstream films.

    The Salt Lake Film Society is showing its usual slate of independent movies this weekend at the Broadway Centre Cinemas, at 111 E. 300 South Salt Lake City, and a series of special screenings at the Tower Theatre, 876 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City:

    “Welcome to the Rubber Room” (Friday, 7:30 p.m.; tickets are $10) • The regional premiere of Utah maverick Trent Harris’ latest film, a skewed look at the art scene. Harris and cast members will take part in the red carpet festivities before the 8 p.m. screening. (There also will be a 9 p.m. screening, without the premiere events, at regular admission prices.)

    “Looking for David” (Saturday, 7 p.m.; tickets are $10) • Betsy L. Ross’s documentary — about her son, the talented actor David Ross Fetzer, his addiction to painkillers, and his death from an accidental overdose at age 30 — has its regional premiere. Ross and other cast members will take part in a Q&A after the screening. (The movie screens again Sunday at 2 p.m., at regular admission prices.)

    “44 Pages” (Sunday, 4 p.m.; tickets are $10) • The regional premiere of Tony Shaff’s documentary about Highlights for Children, the venerable children’s magazine and staple of pediatric waiting rooms everywhere, as the staff puts together its 70th anniversary issue. Director Tony Staff will take part in a Q&A after the screening.

    “Titicut Follies” (Sunday, 6:30 p.m.; tickets are $10) • A 50th-anniversary 4K restoration, with bonus content, of Frederick Wiseman’s controversial 1967 documentary, a look inside a Massachusetts mental institution. A pre-taped conversation between Wiseman and director Wes Anderson is part of the presentation.

    ———

    The Park City Film Series is also taking part in Art House Theater Day, with a special screening of the animated “Revolting Rhymes,” Sunday at 4 p.m. at the Park City Library Center, 1255 Park Ave., Park City. Tickets are $5, and free popcorn is provided.

    “Revolting Rhymes,” based on a book by Roald Dahl (“Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” “The BFG”) is a series of twisted takes on famous fairytales.

    ‘Rebel in the Rye’ gives a dull reading of J.D. Salinger’s life


    Fans of the author J.D. Salinger and his singular novel, “The Catcher in the Rye,” will likely know most of the details divulged in writer-director Danny Strong’s biographical drama “Rebel in the Rye” — and anyone, fan or not, will likely...

    Fans of the author J.D. Salinger and his singular novel, “The Catcher in the Rye,” will likely know most of the details divulged in writer-director Danny Strong’s biographical drama “Rebel in the Rye” — and anyone, fan or not, will likely find Strong’s recounting quite dull.

    After an opening that shows Salinger (Nicholas Hoult) in a mental institution, shell-shocked from what he saw as a soldier in World War II, Strong introduces the author as an ambitious, slightly arrogant young college student in 1939. Defying his businessman father (Victor Garber) and pleasing his mother (Hope Davis), he declares he intends to become a writer and enrolls at Columbia University.

    It’s there he encounters his mentor, Whit Burnett (Kevin Spacey), who reads Faulkner aloud and urges his students to think about story first. He singles out the sarcastic Salinger for derision, telling the kid his voice, though strong, gets in the way of his storytelling. Burnett, who also edits the edgy magazine Story, also gives Salinger his first rejection notice. It isn’t the last, though Salinger hones his short-story abilities until Burnett believes his student has the commitment to be “a true writer.”

    One of Salinger’s short stories — one that even gets the attention of the snooty editors at The New Yorker — revolves around an angry young man, who like Salinger decries the phoniness of everyone around him. Burnett advises Salinger to expand the story and give the character, Holden Caulfield, a novel. “I’m a dash man, not a miler,” Salinger replies, showing doubt that a short-story writer like him can create a novel.

    Then comes World War II, and Salinger says goodbye to his parents and his fickle girlfriend — Oona O’Neill (Zoey Deutch), the estranged daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill — to enlist in the Army. As he lands on the beach at Normandy, sees combat firsthand and hands out rations in a just-liberated concentration camp, Salinger has one thing to keep his mind occupied: the novel about Holden Caulfield.

    Strong, adapting a biography of the author by Kenneth Slawenski, dutifully hits the high spots of Salinger’s young life. He tries to imbue every checkpoint in Salinger’s story with importance, but his equal emphasis on each event — his romantic misadventures, his disputes with Burnett, his dabbling in Zen Buddhism and yoga — means that nothing stands out. It’s as if Strong followed Burnett’s advice to his students, to read in a monotone and let the story carry the day, in screenplay form.

    In the process, Strong squanders a talented cast — including Sarah Paulson as Salinger’s literary agent — and solid performances by Hoult and Spacey. In spite of the title, and the spirit of Holden Caulfield, there’s little that’s rebellious in “Rebel in the Rye.”

    * *
    Rebel in the Rye
    Author J.D. Salinger’s life is given a by-the-numbers biographical treatment in this drama.
    Where • Broadway Centre Cinemas.
    When • Opens Friday, Sept. 22.
    Rating • PG-13 for some language including sexual references, brief violence and smoking.
    Running time • 106 minutes.

    ‘LEGO Ninjago Movie’ pieces together genres for laughs


    Outside of Quentin Tarantino, it’s hard to think of a group of filmmakers more devoted to genre movies — and messing with their conventions — than the folks behind the LEGO animated movies.The brick-based franchise’s third outing, “The LEGO...

    Outside of Quentin Tarantino, it’s hard to think of a group of filmmakers more devoted to genre movies — and messing with their conventions — than the folks behind the LEGO animated movies.

    The brick-based franchise’s third outing, “The LEGO Ninjago Movie,” mixes Hong Kong-style martial arts and Japanese kaiju monster traditions into a smartly funny adventure that will have kids and adults laughing in equal measure.

    Following the lead of LEGO’s toy line and animated TV series, “Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu,” the movie follows the exploits of six high-school kids who are mostly shunned by the popular kids. None is shunned more than Lloyd (voiced by Dave Franco), because he’s known all around as the son of Lord Garmadon (voiced by Justin Theroux), the Vaderesque baddie who regularly tries to destroy the city of Ninjago (pronounced nin-JAH-go).

    The six teens — besides Lloyd, there are Cole (voiced by Fred Armisen), Jay (voiced by Kumail Nanjiani), Kai (voiced by Michael Peña), Zane (voiced by Zack Woods) and Nya (voiced by Abbi Jacobsen) — also have secret identities as ninja warriors who command “Power Rangers”-like mechanical vehicles to battle Garmadon every time he attacks. The six train under Master Wu, who is voiced by Jackie Chan, who also appears in the movie’s live-action framing story.

    As Lloyd tries to reconcile how his mom, Koko (voiced by Olivia Munn), could have ever fallen in love with “the worst guy ever,” he also becomes more determined to defeat Garmadon once and for all. But his impetuousness becomes the ninja’s downfall, and he lets Master Wu’s “ultimate weapon” fall into Garmadon’s four hands.

    With the city in peril, albeit the cutest peril imaginable, Master Wu sends his young ninja on a quest for “the ultimate, ultimate weapon.” Garmadon follows the ninjas, and soon he and Lloyd are forced to cooperate to survive in the green-brick jungle.

    Directors Charlie Bean, Paul Fisher and Bob Logan — overseeing a team of nine credited writers and probably more not listed — throw jokes with the speed and accuracy of ninja stars. Whether it’s sight gags or pop-culture references (like having minifigure versions of Michael Strahan and Robin Roberts hosting “Good Morning Ninjago”), the inventiveness of the humor is boundless.

    For fans of old-school Asian cinema, there are plenty of throwaway references that diehards will love. (Example: The opening Warner Bros. logo emulates that of the legendary Hong Kong studio Shaw Brothers — a shield that was modeled after the WB logo.)

    The storyline of “The LEGO Ninjago Movie” is more conventional than either “The LEGO Movie” or “The LEGO Batman Movie” were, and sometimes the jokes give way to sappy moments of father-son conflict and reconciliation. But then one remembers these are 2-inch-high plastic figures (or computer-animated simulations of them) having their emotional breakthroughs, and one starts laughing all over again.

    * * * 1/2
    ’The LEGO Ninjago Movie’
    Two-inch-high ninja warriors battle an evil warlord, and intergenerational conflict, in this hilarious animated take on classic Asian cinema.
    Where • Theaters everywhere.
    When • Opens Friday, Sept. 22.
    Rating • PG for some mild action and rude humor.
    Running time • 101 minutes.

    Trump piles economic action onto his NKorea military threats


    New York • President Donald Trump added economic action to his fiery military threats against North Korea on Thursday, authorizing stiffer new sanctions in response to the Koreans’ nuclear weapons advances. He said China was imposing major banking...

    New York • President Donald Trump added economic action to his fiery military threats against North Korea on Thursday, authorizing stiffer new sanctions in response to the Koreans’ nuclear weapons advances. He said China was imposing major banking sanctions, too, but there was no immediate confirmation from the North’s most important trading partner.

    Trump praised China for instructing its banks to cut off business with Pyongyang, but neither the Chinese nor Trump officials were ready to say so. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said he had spoken at length Thursday with the head of China’s central bank but “I am not going to comment on confidential discussions.”

    If enforced, the Chinese action Trump described could severely impede the isolated North’s ability to raise money for its missile and nuclear development. China, responsible for about 90 percent of North Korea’s trade, serves as the country’s conduit to the international banking system.

    Trump’s announcement of U.S. action came as he met on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly with leaders from South Korea and Japan, the nations most immediately imperiled by North Korea’s threats of a missile strike. His executive order adds to a U.S.-led campaign to isolate and impoverish Kim Jong Un’s government until it halts the missile and nuclear tests that, combined with Trump’s threats, have stoked global fears of war.

    The concern has intensified as Pyongyang has marched closer in recent months to achieving a nuclear-tipped missile that could strike America. The crisis has dominated the president’s debut at this week’s annual General Assembly meeting, where Trump threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea if forced to defend the United States or its allies.

    “North Korea’s nuclear weapons and missile development is a grave threat to peace and security in our world and it is unacceptable that others financially support this criminal, rogue regime,” Trump said Thursday as joined Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in for lunch. “Tolerance for this disgraceful practice must end now.”

    Mnuchin said the executive order expands the Treasury Department’s ability to target anyone conducting significant trade in goods, services or technology with North Korea, and to ban them from interacting with the U.S. financial system.

    “Foreign financial institutions must choose between doing business with the United States or facilitating trade with North Korea or its designated supporters,” the order says. It also issues a 180-day ban on vessels and aircraft that have visited North Korea from visiting the United States.

    Washington, however, is still banking on Beijing’s help to get the North to stand down.

    Trump commended Chinese President Xi Jinping for a “very bold” order by his nation’s central bank to stop China’s financial institutions from dealing with North Korea. Such action, if confirmed by China, would answer a longstanding request from the U.S. and its allies. They also want strict Chinese enforcement of U.N. sanctions that were tightened this month after North Korea’s most powerful nuclear test to date.

    In recent months, the North also has launched a pair of intercontinental missiles believed capable of striking the continental United States and another pair that soared over Japanese territory.

    Trump said the China action he described “was a somewhat unexpected move and we appreciate it.”

    China remains leery of pressuring North Korea into collapse and has resisted cutting off its critical oil supplies, not wanting chaos on its border. Along with Russia, China wants the U.S. to seek dialogue with the North. American officials say the time isn’t right for any formal diplomatic process. Foreign Minister Wang Yi said Thursday that negotiations are the “only way out” of the nuclear standoff.

    Several news outlets this month have reported Chinese steps to restrict banking transactions, but the government hasn’t made a formal announcement. Asked for comment last week, the Foreign Ministry said China has always fully implemented U.N. sanctions on North Korea but opposes “unilateral” restrictions imposed by another country on Chinese entities. China’s embassy in Washington declined to comment Thursday.

    Trump’s return to focusing on North Korea’s economy may temper international unease over his tough address Tuesday. He mocked Kim as a “Rocket Man” on a “suicide mission,” and sketched out potentially cataclysmic consequences. While Trump spoke of his own nation’s patience, he said that if “forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.”

    Trump’s messengers backed him up in television appearances Thursday. Vice President Mike Pence told Fox News: “We do not desire a military conflict. But the president has made it very clear, as he did at the U.N. this week, that all options are on the table and we are simply not going to tolerate a rogue regime in Pyongyang obtaining usable nuclear weapons that could be mounted on a ballistic missile and threaten the people of the United States or our allies.”

    Trump’s heated language was rare for a U.S. president at the rostrum of the United Nations. But the speech was textbook Trump, dividing the globe into friends and foes and taking unflinching aim at America’s enemies. He drew a sharp rebuke from the North’s Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho, who said, “It would be a dog’s dream if he intended to scare us with the sound of a dog barking.”

    ___

    Associated Press writer Darlene Superville contributed to this report.


    Aaron Hernandez lawyer: Brain showed 'severe' case of CTE


    Boston • Aaron Hernandez’s lawyer says the former New England Patriots tight end’s brain showed severe signs of the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy.In a news conference at his offices, attorney Jose Baez says testing...

    Boston • Aaron Hernandez’s lawyer says the former New England Patriots tight end’s brain showed severe signs of the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    In a news conference at his offices, attorney Jose Baez says testing showed that Hernandez had a severe case of the disease.

    CTE can be caused by repeated head trauma and leads to symptoms like violent mood swings, depression and other cognitive difficulties. Hernandez killed himself in April in the jail cell where he was serving a life-without-parole sentence for a 2013 murder. His death came just hours before the Patriots visited the White House to celebrate their latest Super Bowl victory.

    CTE can only be diagnosed in an autopsy. A recent study found evidence of the disease in 110 of 111 former NFL players whose brains were examined.

    CTE has been linked with repeated concussions and involves brain damage particularly in the frontal region that controls many functions including judgment, emotion, impulse control, social behavior and memory.

    A star for the University of Florida when it won the 2008 title, Hernandez dropped to the fourth round of the NFL draft because of trouble in college that included a failed drug test and a bar fight. His name had also come up in an investigation into a shooting.

    In three seasons with the Patriots, Hernandez joined Rob Gronkowski to form one of the most potent tight end duos in NFL history. In 2011, his second season, Hernandez caught 79 passes for 910 yards and seven touchdowns to help the team reach the Super Bowl, and he was rewarded with a $40 million contract.

    But the Patriots released him in 2013, shortly after he was arrested in the killing of semi-pro football player Odin Lloyd, who was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee. Hernandez was convicted and sentenced to life in prison; the conviction was voided because he died before his appeals were exhausted, though that decision is itself being appealed.

    A week before his suicide, Hernandez was acquitted in the 2012 drive-by shootings of two men in Boston. Prosecutors had argued that Hernandez gunned the two men down after one accidentally spilled a drink on him in a nightclub, and then got a tattoo of a handgun and the words “God Forgives” to commemorate the crime.


    Albert Hunt: Republican nonsense sells health-care plan

    Albert Hunt: Republican nonsense sells health-care plan


    Congressional Republicans are rushing to overhaul the U.S. health-care system by passing a bill that is based on dishonest claims, avoids the usual professional analysis, and makes a mockery of serious legislative process.The Senate is scheduled to vote...

    Congressional Republicans are rushing to overhaul the U.S. health-care system by passing a bill that is based on dishonest claims, avoids the usual professional analysis, and makes a mockery of serious legislative process.

    The Senate is scheduled to vote next week on a proposal by Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana to repeal and replace much of the Affordable Care Act passed by a Democratic Congress in 2009. Earlier Republican efforts failed, but this time, using more than a little sleight of hand, party leaders and the White House think they may pull it off.

    The plan is to approve the legislation with only Republican votes in the Senate, with limited debate and before the Congressional Budget Office has time to analyze the costs and impact, then to rush the same bill through the House and send it to President Donald Trump. Haste is necessary because the procedural window will close at the end of September for passage with only Republican votes.

    There have been no hearings on the bill despite its massive impact on the U.S. economy and health-care system.

    Graham and Cassidy have sold this hastily assembled measure as a bipartisan compromise that, rather than cutting coverage, merely gives the funds and flexibility to the states to determine their own health-care policies.

    None of that holds up. The bill is purely partisan. It’s being rushed through for the simple reason that it lacks any Democratic support.

    Graham, in press conferences, has hailed the plan as a middle-ground compromise between Obamacare and the coverage-slashing Republican proposals that collapsed in July.

    That’s nonsense. It’s crafted to appeal to Republican voters and lawmakers by cutting Medicaid spending in states where Democrats dominate and increasing it where Republicans hold sway. Graham claimed to Breitbart News that the measure “will score very well” with the CBO even though he’s hurrying to avoid CBO scrutiny because it almost certainly won’t.

    The sponsors suggest that their plan wouldn’t really cut health-care funding, instead replacing Obamacare subsidies and Medicaid expansion with block grants to states. Sorry, guys: It does cut funding dramatically.

    Avalare Health, a respected, nonpartisan consulting and analytical firm, estimated this week that federal spending would be cut $215 billion over 10 years from Affordable Care Act projections. Without congressional action, that would turn into trillions over two decades, Avalare estimates.

    The Louisiana health secretary, Rebekah Gee, wrote to Cassidy this week to outline the devastating effect his proposal would have on his home state.

    It “gravely threatens health-care access and coverage for our state,” she wrote, especially for the poor, those with disabilities and the elderly. She noted that in addition to cutbacks in the Affordable Care Act, Graham-Cassidy imposes a cap on other Medicaid spending which would ultimately result in deep reductions. Cassidy questioned her numbers; he’s the one who won’t wait for the CBO analysis.

    The block grants to states would expire in 2026. Sponsors say that rather than causing draconian cuts then, the grants simply can be extended. But Graham and Cassidy specifically chose not to extend them beyond 10 years.

    Supporters also contend that the bill does not undo the Obamacare prohibition against discrimination in health insurance aimed at people with pre-existing medical conditions. That’s more nonsense. It permits states to waive this requirement; where they do, it will make coverage unaffordable for millions of people with chronic diseases and disabilities. It also guts current guarantees of coverage for mental health treatment.

    The Graham-Cassidy bill is opposed by the American Medical Association, the pediatrics and family-physician associations, the nurses’ group, the Children’s Hospital Association and most advocacy groups for people suffering from major diseases, like the American Cancer Society. They all understand what the bill would do.

    Still, there is at least an even chance that the Graham-Cassidy bill will pass Congress and be sent to the White House. When the dire consequences ensue, backers will claim it’s all because of Obamacare, another lie.



    - Hunt is a Bloomberg View columnist. He was the executive editor of Bloomberg News, before which he was a reporter, bureau chief and executive Washington editor at the Wall Street Journal.

    For more columns from Bloomberg View, visit http://www.bloomberg.com/view.


    Murray police confirm identity of body found in Millcreek

    Murray police confirm identity of body found in Millcreek


    Murray police confirmed Thursday that a body recovered from a stream in Millcreek was that of a man who had been missing since Sept. 14.The body was found Wednesday morning. The family of Nick Kapos, 82, had said Wednesday afternoon the body was his....

    Murray police confirmed Thursday that a body recovered from a stream in Millcreek was that of a man who had been missing since Sept. 14.

    The body was found Wednesday morning. The family of Nick Kapos, 82, had said Wednesday afternoon the body was his. Kapos had suffered from dementia. 

    “The outcome is tragic and has hit us to the core,” said family spokeswoman Trish Kapos in an emailed statement Wednesday.

    The family and dozens of other volunteers searched for Kapos through the weekend and into this week, putting up flyers and canvassing Murray-area businesses.

    Murray police Officer Kenny Bass said he did not have information on how long the man had been in the water, and “how he got in there could be anybody‘s guess.”

    Another of Kapos’ daughters, Kathy Stephenson, is a reporter for The Salt Lake Tribune.

    Girl still buried in ruins of Mexico school, anxiety grows


    Update: A high-ranking navy official said Thursday there is no missing child at a collapsed Mexico City school that had become a focus of rescue efforts following this week’s deadly magnitude 7.1 earthquake, though an adult still may be alive in the...

    Update: A high-ranking navy official said Thursday there is no missing child at a collapsed Mexico City school that had become a focus of rescue efforts following this week’s deadly magnitude 7.1 earthquake, though an adult still may be alive in the rubble.

    Mexico City • A delicate effort to reach a young girl buried in the ruins of her school stretched into a new day on Thursday, a vigil broadcast across the nation as rescue workers struggled to pick away unstable debris and reach her.

    The sight of her wiggling fingers early Wednesday became a symbol for the hope that drove thousands of professionals and volunteers to work frantically at dozens of wrecked buildings across the capital and nearby states looking for survivors of the magnitude 7.1 quake that killed at least 245 people in central Mexico and injured over 2,000.

    Mexico’s navy announced early Thursday it had recovered the body of a school worker from the Enrique Rebsamen school, but still had not been able to rescue the trapped child.

    Rescuers removed dirt and debris bucketful by bucketful and passed a scanner over the rubble of the school every hour or so to search for heat signatures that could indicate trapped survivors. Shortly before dawn the pile of debris shuddered ominously, prompting those working atop it to evacuate.

    “We are just meters (yards) away from getting to the children, but we can’t access it until it is shored up,” said Vladimir Navarro, a university employee who was exhausted after working all night. “With the shaking there has been, it is very unstable and taking any decision is dangerous.”

    Mexico City Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera said the number of confirmed dead in the capital had risen from 100 to 115, bringing the overall toll from the quake to 245. He also said two women and a man had been pulled alive from a collapsed office building in the city’s center Wednesday night, almost 36 hours after the quake.

    Still, frustration was growing as the rescue effort stretched into Day 3.

    Outside a collapsed seven-story office building in the trendy Roma Norte district, a list of those rescued was strung between two trees. Relatives of the missing compared it against their own list of those who were in the building when the quake struck — more than two dozen names — kept in a spiral notebook.

    Patricia Fernandez’s 27-year-old nephew, Ivan Colin Fernandez, worked as an accountant in the seven-story building, which pancaked to the ground, taking part of the building next door with it.

    She said the last time the family got an update was late yesterday: That about 14 people were believed to be alive inside, and only three had gotten out.

    “They should keep us informed,” Fernandez said as her sister, the man’s mother, wept into Fernandez’s black fleece sweater. “Because I think what kills us most is the desperation of not knowing anything.”

    Referring to rumors that authorities intend to bring in heavy machinery that could risk bringing buildings down on anyone still alive inside, Fernandez said: “That seems unjust to us because there are still people alive inside and that’s not OK.”

    “I think they should wait until they take the last one out,” she said.

    Seeking to dispel the rumors, National Civil Protection chief Luis Felipe Puente tweeted Thursday that heavy machinery “is NOT being used” in search-and-rescue efforts.

    President Enrique Pena Nieto declared three days of mourning as soldiers, police, firefighters and everyday citizens dug through the rubble, at times with their hands, gaining an inch at a time.

    “There are still people groaning. There are three more floors to remove rubble from. And you still hear people in there,” said Evodio Dario Marcelino, a volunteer who was working with dozens of others at a collapsed apartment building.

    A man was pulled alive from a partly collapsed apartment building in northern Mexico City more than 24 hours after the Tuesday quake and taken away in a stretcher, apparently conscious

    In all, 52 people had been rescued alive since the quake, the city’s Social Development Department said, adding in a tweet: “We won’t stop.” It was a race against time, Pena Nieto warned in a tweet of his own saying that “every minute counts to save lives.”

    But the country’s attention focused on the collapsed Enrique Rebsamen school on the city’s south side, where 21 children and five adults have now been confirmed dead.

    Hopes rose Wednesday when workers told local media they had detected signs that a girl was alive and she was speaking to them through a hole dug in the rubble. Thermal imaging suggested several more people might be in the air space around her.

    A volunteer rescue worker, Hector Mendez, said cameras lowered into the rubble suggested there might be four people still inside, but he added that it wasn’t clear if anyone besides the girl was alive.

    Dr. Alfredo Vega, who was working with the rescue team, said that a girl, whom he identified only as Frida Sofia, had been located alive under the pancaked floor slabs.

    “She is alive, and she is telling us that there are five more children alive” in the same space, Vega said.

    But authorities said the identity of the girl was unclear because no relatives had come forward with information.

    The debris removed from the school changed as crews worked their way deeper, from huge chunks of brick and concrete to pieces of wood that looked like remnants of desks and paneling to a load that contained a half dozen sparkly hula-hoops.

    Rescuers carried in lengths of wide steel pipe big enough for someone to crawl through, apparently trying to create a tunnel into the collapsed slabs of the three-story school building. But a heavy rain fell during the night, and the tottering pile of rubble had to be shored up with hundreds of wooden beams.

    People have rallied to help their neighbors in a huge volunteer effort that includes people from all walks of life in Mexico City, where social classes seldom mix. Doctors, dentists and lawyers stood alongside construction workers and street sweepers, handing buckets of debris or chunks of concrete hand-to-hand down the line.

    At a collapsed factory building closer to the city’s center, giant cranes lifted huge slabs of concrete from the towering pile of rubble, like peeling layers from an onion. Workers with hand tools would quickly move in to look for signs of survivors and begin attacking the next layer.

    In addition to those killed in Mexico City, the federal civil defense agency said 69 died in Morelos state just south of the capital and 43 in Puebla state to the southeast, where the quake was centered. The rest of the deaths were in Mexico State, which borders Mexico City on three sides, Guerrero and Oaxaca states.

    ___

    Associated Press journalists Miguel Tovar and Peter Orsi in Mexico City and Carlos Rodriguez in Jojutla contributed to this report.


    Mexico navy official: No missing child in collapsed school


    Mexico City • A high-ranking navy official said Thursday there is no missing child at a collapsed Mexico City school that had become a focus of rescue efforts following this week’s deadly magnitude 7.1 earthquake, though an adult still may be alive...

    Mexico City • A high-ranking navy official said Thursday there is no missing child at a collapsed Mexico City school that had become a focus of rescue efforts following this week’s deadly magnitude 7.1 earthquake, though an adult still may be alive in the rubble.

    Navy Assistant Secretary Angel Enrique Sarmiento said that while there are blood traces and other signs suggesting that someone is alive, all the school’s children have been accounted for.

    “We have done an accounting with school officials and we are certain that all the children either died, unfortunately, are in hospitals or are safe at their homes,” Sarmiento said.

    The attention of many in Mexico and abroad had been drawn to the plight of a girl identified only as Frida Sofia, who was said to have been located alive under the pancaked school building and became a symbol for the hopes of thousands of rescuers working around the clock in search of quake survivors.

    Multiple rescuers at the school site spoke of the girl, with some saying she had reported five more children alive in the same space. Yet no family members had emerged while rescue efforts continued, and some officials had begun to say her identity was not clear.

    Tuesday’s magnitude 7.1 quake killed at least 245 people in central Mexico and injured over 2,000. That included at least 21 children and five adults at the Enrique Rebsamen school in southern Mexico City.

    Earlier Thursday, the navy announced it had recovered the body of a school worker from the school.

    Rescuers removed dirt and debris bucketful by bucketful and passed a scanner over the rubble of the school every hour or so to search for heat signatures that could indicate trapped survivors. Shortly before dawn the pile of debris shuddered ominously, prompting those working atop it to evacuate.

    “With the shaking there has been, it is very unstable and taking any decision is dangerous,” said Vladimir Navarro, a university employee who was exhausted after working all night.”

    Mexico City Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera said the number of confirmed dead in the capital had risen from 100 to 115, bringing the overall toll from the quake to 245. He also said two women and a man had been pulled alive from a collapsed office building in the city’s center Wednesday night, almost 36 hours after the quake.

    Still, frustration was growing as the rescue effort stretched into Day 3.

    Outside a collapsed seven-story office building in the trendy Roma Norte district, a list of those rescued was strung between two trees. Relatives of the missing compared it against their own list of those who were in the building when the quake struck — more than two dozen names — kept in a spiral notebook.

    Patricia Fernandez’s 27-year-old nephew, Ivan Colin Fernandez, worked as an accountant in the seven-story building, which pancaked to the ground, taking part of the building next door with it.

    She said the last time the family got an update was late yesterday: That about 14 people were believed to be alive inside, and only three had gotten out.

    “They should keep us informed,” Fernandez said as her sister, the man’s mother, wept into Fernandez’s black fleece sweater. “Because I think what kills us most is the desperation of not knowing anything.”

    Referring to rumors that authorities intend to bring in heavy machinery that could risk bringing buildings down on anyone still alive inside, Fernandez said: “That seems unjust to us because there are still people alive inside and that’s not OK.”

    “I think they should wait until they take the last one out,” she said.

    Seeking to dispel the rumors, National Civil Protection chief Luis Felipe Puente tweeted Thursday that heavy machinery “is NOT being used” in search-and-rescue efforts.

    President Enrique Pena Nieto declared three days of mourning as soldiers, police, firefighters and everyday citizens dug through the rubble, at times with their hands, gaining an inch at a time.

    “There are still people groaning. There are three more floors to remove rubble from. And you still hear people in there,” said Evodio Dario Marcelino, a volunteer who was working with dozens of others at a collapsed apartment building.

    A man was pulled alive from a partly collapsed apartment building in northern Mexico City more than 24 hours after the Tuesday quake and taken away in a stretcher, apparently conscious

    In all, 52 people had been rescued alive since the quake, the city’s Social Development Department said, adding in a tweet: “We won’t stop.” It was a race against time, Pena Nieto warned in a tweet of his own saying that “every minute counts to save lives.”

    People have rallied to help their neighbors in a huge volunteer effort that includes people from all walks of life in Mexico City, where social classes seldom mix. Doctors, dentists and lawyers stood alongside construction workers and street sweepers, handing buckets of debris or chunks of concrete hand-to-hand down the line.

    At a collapsed factory building closer to the city’s center, giant cranes lifted huge slabs of concrete from the towering pile of rubble, like peeling layers from an onion. Workers with hand tools would quickly move in to look for signs of survivors and begin attacking the next layer.

    In addition to those killed in Mexico City, the federal civil defense agency said 69 died in Morelos state just south of the capital and 43 in Puebla state to the southeast, where the quake was centered. The rest of the deaths were in Mexico State, which borders Mexico City on three sides, Guerrero and Oaxaca states.

    ___

    Associated Press journalists Miguel Tovar and Peter Orsi in Mexico City and Carlos Rodriguez in Jojutla contributed to this report.


    Babies try harder when they see you sweat, research shows


    New York • If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Especially if a baby is watching.Children around 15 months old can become more persistent in pursuing a goal if they’ve just seen an adult struggle at a task before succeeding, a new study...

    New York • If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Especially if a baby is watching.

    Children around 15 months old can become more persistent in pursuing a goal if they’ve just seen an adult struggle at a task before succeeding, a new study says.

    The results suggest there may be value in letting children see you sweat. “Showing children that hard work works might encourage them to work hard too,” researchers conclude in a report released Thursday by the journal Science.

    The babies in the study didn’t simply imitate what the grown-ups did. They faced a different challenge, showing they had absorbed a general lesson about the value of sticking to a task.

    Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology conducted three experiments that included a total of 262 children ages 13 months to 18 months, with an average of 15 months.

    The basic procedure was this: Two groups of children first watched a researcher remove a rubber frog from a clear plastic container, and also unhook a key chain from a carabiner, a metal ring with a hinged side.

    For one group, the researcher succeeded only after 30 seconds of appearing to struggle to figure out how to do the task. For the other, success came easily, within just 10 seconds, and she demonstrated the answer three times in 30 seconds. In both cases, she kept up a narration (“Look there’s something inside of there! I want to get it out! ... Does this work? No, how about this ...”)

    After seeing the adult solve the challenges, the babies were shown that a felt-covered box could play music, and they were encouraged to turn the music on. The box had a large red button to press, but it was inactive. The question was how long the children would persist in pushing the button.

    Across the three experiments, children consistently pressed the button more often if they’d seen the researcher struggle than if she had solved her tasks easily. In one experiment, for example, they pushed it an average of 23 times after seeing her struggle but only 12 times if the researcher had not displayed much effort. That smaller number is about what other babies did if they were just handed the cube in the first place, without seeing an adult fiddle with anything.

    The effect was much stronger if the researcher had actively engaged the child while doing her own tasks by making eye contact, using the child’s name, and adopting the high-pitched, exaggerated-melody style of speech that adults typically use to hold a child’s attention.

    Results show such young children “can learn the value of effort from just a couple of examples,” said study senior author Laura Schulz.

    The study could not determine how long the effect lasts, nor does it show that parents could get the same result with their children. But “it can’t hurt to try in front of your child,” said Julia Leonard, another author.

    Elizabeth Gunderson, an assistant professor of psychology at Temple University in Philadelphia who did not participate in the work, called the results compelling. It is surprising that such young children picked up on the general idea of continued effort toward a goal, she said in an email.


    Commentary: The American West is burning

    Commentary: The American West is burning


    Hurricanes such as Harvey, Irma and Maria are unstoppable. They rip at our coastlines and tear at our hearts. The yellow, orange, red, even purple colors on the Doppler radar and weather maps this summer have been horrific to see, but that’s nothing...

    Hurricanes such as Harvey, Irma and Maria are unstoppable. They rip at our coastlines and tear at our hearts. The yellow, orange, red, even purple colors on the Doppler radar and weather maps this summer have been horrific to see, but that’s nothing compared to the images of flooded streets and wrecked homes. Those images inspired Americans to band together and do what we could for our neighbors in the South. In crises such as these, Americans show what they’re truly made of: unwavering resolve and kind hearts.

    But if you could, return to the weather map, zoom out for a moment and scroll up about 2,000 miles northwest. You won’t see torrential rain or hurricane force winds. You will see red — fire red — and it’s on the move. Searing wildfires have transformed national parks, dense forests, grazing pastures and homes into blistered, smoldering wastelands. In my home state of Montana, more than 1 million acres have burned this year. Nationally, we’ve lost more than 8 million acres.

    The crisis in the West is not water; it’s fire. It has spread rapidly and with increasing intensity while the nation’s attention has been elsewhere. It’s time we modernize federal regulations to address the problem.

    Since the 1990s, environmental lawsuits and excessive regulation have become barriers to responsible forest management. Every year, the Forest Service spends more than $350 million trying to comply with federal law governing forest management projects to prevent litigation, but it is routinely sued by radical environmental groups anyway.

    The results of this obstruction are clear and appalling. The risk of wildfires has grown considerably, devastating communities that thrive on the economic benefits of National Forests. That means lost jobs and lost tax revenue for schools and critical infrastructure.

    If you look at the decline in timber harvests on National Forest land since 1990, you can’t miss the correlation between harvesting and wildfire. Harvests drastically declined, and, combined with the legal obstacles preventing the removal of fire fuel, wildfires grew larger and more severe. We have effectively increased the risk of wildfire by allowing cluttered forest floors to build up with more material that can burn. The Forest Service estimates there are now 6.3 billion dead and diseased trees across 11 Western states. These diseased trees increase the risk of wildfire and pose a direct threat to the safety of wildland firefighters. In fact, two Montana firefighters were killed this year after dead trees burned and collapsed.

    Montana’s mills frequently experience log shortages, but regulations and chronic litigation prevent them from harvesting the trees that threaten to burn. To make up for this timber, mills must import from Canada and other states.

    An abundance of science shows that a properly managed forest would reduce the size and severity of wildfires, while improving fish and wildlife habitat, water quality and recreation opportunities. By increasing responsible timber harvests, we could also enhance public safety by reducing the enormous amount of greenhouse gases and smoke that rise into the air during wildfires.

    We cannot prevent hurricanes, nor can we can prevent the droughts, winds and lightning strikes that contribute to wildfires. But what we can control is how we manage our National Forests. We should pass reforms that allow forest management projects to occur without the threat of frivolous lawsuits by fringe environmentalists. We also need to cut red tape, such as reducing the length of time for environmental reviews, to allow the Forest Service to better manage our forests. And we need to protect the Forest Service budget from the ever-growing cost of putting out fires.

    We must do these things to reduce the severity of wildfires, mitigate the risk to our nation’s firefighters, protect more communities, bring loggers back to work and save our public lands from becoming charred shadows of once-beautiful landscapes.

    I grew up — and still live — just 90 miles outside of Yellowstone National Park. Glacier National Park is about 290 miles to the north. If we don’t act on forest management reform, the treasured forests and skylines I have loved all my life may not look the same for my grandchildren, and I won’t stand for that. Nor do I think the American people will. Once they see tragedy, they band together and act. Either we will manage the forests, or the forests will manage us.


    Daines, a Republican, represents Montana in the U.S. Senate.


    Bagley Cartoon: It's Our Fault


    This Pat Bagley cartoon appears in The Salt Lake Tribune on Friday, Sept. 22, 2017.You can check out the past 10 Bagley editorial cartoons below. Want more? Become a fan of Bagley on Facebook at www.facebook.com/notrobertkirby.Things That Go Repeal in...

    This Pat Bagley cartoon appears in The Salt Lake Tribune on Friday, Sept. 22, 2017.

    You can check out the past 10 Bagley editorial cartoons below. Want more? Become a fan of Bagley on Facebook at www.facebook.com/notrobertkirby.

    Things That Go Repeal in the Night

    Keeping Korea Safe

    Korea Continued

    How to Run a Country

    Universal Care Canards

    Half-Baked Religious Freedom

    Sympathy for the Devos

    The Man in the High Castle

    Hurricane Force Stupidity

    Trumps Red Lines


    Utah State grad looking forward to bringing Star-Lord to life for a home crowd in Marvel live show


    Getting to dress up in a leather jacket and run around a stage filled with motorcycle stunt actors, martial artists and warring superheroes is a delight for Logan native Isaac Spooner.Spooner, 25, plays Star-Lord in the “Marvel Universe Live! Age of...

    Getting to dress up in a leather jacket and run around a stage filled with motorcycle stunt actors, martial artists and warring superheroes is a delight for Logan native Isaac Spooner.

    Spooner, 25, plays Star-Lord in the “Marvel Universe Live! Age of Heroes” show coming to the Maverik Center from Sept. 28 to Oct. 1. While it’s a pretty big departure from the Shakespearean plays that hooked him on acting while in high school, he enjoys exploring the role.

    “As somebody who started in acting, Star-Lord is more of a challenge and less of a challenge than Captain America or Black Panther,” Spooner said. “He’s not some supersoldier. He’s just a dude who learned how to be a space pirate.”

    The show brings together several Marvel characters, including Spider-Man, the Avengers, the Guardians of the Galaxy (the group Star-Lord, aka Peter Quill, leads), Wasp, Iron Fist and Doctor Strange, to battle enemies such as Green Goblin, Loki and Nebula for control of the Wand of Watoomb.

    It’s a storyline perfectly suited for a comic book, with the threat of massive destruction spurring the heroes to action.

    “Star-Lord’s perspective on all of this universe-ending nonsense is that he just wants to cruise around his spaceship and maybe get rich,” Spooner said. “It’s fun in that way because for someone who lives in space, it’s a very down-to-earth perspective.”

    The entire show is on a recorded track, including the actors’ lines, so it becomes a somewhat out-of-body experience for Spooner.

    “It’s like when you’re singing along to the radio when you’re in the car,” he said. “You shut one part of your mind off, but that allows your body to fill lines that are being said for you. It’s really pretty interesting.”

    He loves seeing the joy the show brings to kids in the audience, who are often thrilled at seeing their favorite superheroes and supervillains come to life accompanied by trick motorcyclists and flashy pyrotechnics.

    “We’ve all seen superhero movies, but there’s something unique about seeing that right in front of your face,” Spooner said. “And we’re bringing in characters like Thor and Loki and Drax and Groot who are from a totally different part of the universe. It’s really exciting to see that in person.”

    Since the show officially started in June, Spooner has performed anywhere from six to nine shows in a weekend. Each stadium tends to look like every other as the set is the same and his entrance spot is the same each time. But playing at home adds some extra pressure.

    “I know my mom will be watching through her fingers and saying ‘Oh god, my baby is coming down from the ceiling!’” Spooner joked.

    But he is excited to have friends he grew up acting in front of in high-school plays see him on such a big stage.

    “It’s hard to pin down a feeling, but it’s going to be a lot of fun,” Spooner said.

    Marvel Universe Live! Age of Heroes
    A live-action, stunt-filled event telling the story of Marvel superheroes such as Captain America, Black Panther and the Guardians of the Galaxy.
    When • Thursday and Friday, Sept. 28-29, at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 30, at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.; Sunday, Oct. 1, at 1 p.m.
    Where • Maverik Center, 3200 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City
    Tickets • $20 to $75, with some children’s $15 tickets available for select performances; Smithstix.com, 800-888-TIXX or the Maverik Center Box Office


    Game of Throws podcast: The real test starts now, as Utah turns its attention to Arizona and Pac-12 play


    The Utes are undefeated.They are ranked in both polls.But did their preseason schedule really challenging enough? We’re about to find out, because the real test starts Friday.As Utah kicks off Pac-12 play this week in Tucson, Ariz., there are still...

    The Utes are undefeated.

    They are ranked in both polls.

    But did their preseason schedule really challenging enough? We’re about to find out, because the real test starts Friday.

    As Utah kicks off Pac-12 play this week in Tucson, Ariz., there are still plenty of questions to answer.

    On this week’s episode of the podcast, Tribune beat writers Lynn Worthy and Christopher Kamrani break down a lopsided win over San Jose State, key in on the most important defensive position in the upcoming matchup with the Wildcats, and discuss what other positions punter Mitch Wishnowsky could play.

    You can listen on iTunes.

    Or SoundCloud:


    Was it a crime? 10 patients at nursing home died after Irma


    Hollywood, Fla. • Ten elderly patients died after being kept inside a nursing home that turned into a sweatbox when Hurricane Irma knocked out its air conditioning for three days, even though just across the street was a fully functioning and cooled...

    Hollywood, Fla. • Ten elderly patients died after being kept inside a nursing home that turned into a sweatbox when Hurricane Irma knocked out its air conditioning for three days, even though just across the street was a fully functioning and cooled hospital.

    From the perspective of Florida Gov. Rick Scott and relatives of those at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, criminal charges are warranted. But under Florida law, a prosecution might be difficult. Two of three ex-state prosecutors contacted by The Associated Press had doubts as to whether Dr. Jack Michel, the home’s owner, or any of his employees will be charged.

    All agreed that any criminal prosecutions will hinge on whether the nursing home staff made honest mistakes or were “culpably negligent.” Florida defines that as “consciously doing an act or following a course of conduct that the defendant must have known, or reasonably should have known, was likely to cause death or great bodily injury.”

    Hollywood police and the state attorney’s office are investigating.

    The home has said it used coolers, fans, ice and other methods to keep the patients comfortable — and that might be enough to avoid prosecution.

    “There is a difference between negligence, which is what occurs when you are not giving a particular standard of care vs. culpable negligence,” said David Weinstein, a former state and federal prosecutor now in private practice. “So if they are doing everything humanly possible given the circumstances and this all still happened it may be negligent and provide the basis for a civil lawsuit, but not enough for criminal charges.”

    Retired University of Florida law professor Bob Dekle, who prosecuted serial killer Ted Bundy as an assistant state attorney, said he doubted charges would be brought.

    “I would rather be a defense attorney on this case than a prosecutor,” Dekle said. “There are some cases that are better tried in civil court than criminal and this might be one of them.”

    Former U.S. Attorney Kendall Coffey disagreed.

    “Given the magnitude of the tragedy and the apparent availability of a hospital 50 yards away, prosecutors are not going to accept that this was an unavoidable tragedy,” he said.

    Gary Matzner, the nursing home’s attorney, said in a statement that Michel and the staff are cooperating with the investigation.

    “The center and its employees and directors are devastated by this tragedy,” he said.

    Irma reached Broward County on Sept. 10. The home has said a felled tree took out a transformer that powered the air conditioner, but it maintained power otherwise. It said it reported the loss to Florida Power & Light and was promised repairs in the next two days, but the utility never arrived.

    Scott’s office said that over those two days, home administrators Jorge Carballo and Natasha Anderson were in contact with the state about the failed air conditioner but never said the situation had become dangerous. The state said they were told to call 911 if needed.

    On the afternoon of Sept. 12, the home borrowed portable air coolers from Memorial Regional Hospital, the trauma center across the street. Later that night, home administrators said, a physician’s assistant checked the patients and none were overheated and the building temperature never exceeded 80 degrees. Under state law, the temperature was not supposed to exceed 81 degrees.

    In the early hours of Sept. 13, the deaths began. Three 911 calls were made before 6 a.m., causing Memorial staff to rush across the street to offer assistance. Doctors and nurses said they found the home’s staff working to cool the patients, although they and police have said the facility was very hot.

    No temperature reading has been released as police have said that is part of the investigation.

    Three people died on the home’s second floor and seven succumbed at the hospital, including a 93-year-old man who died Tuesday and a 94-year-old woman who died Wednesday. The state said four of the deceased had body temperatures between 107 (41.6 Celsius) and 109 (42.7 Celsius) degrees.

    Dr. Randy Katz, the hospital’s emergency director, said last week it was impossible to say whether any of the dead would have survived if they had gotten to the hospital hours earlier.

    The number of deaths and injuries could be a determining factor in whether to bring charges. Weinstein said prosecutors could argue that after the first patients became seriously ill, administrators should have known an evacuation was necessary. Dekle agreed the number could be key.

    “The more dead victims there are in a homicide case, the less likely a jury is to find reasonable doubt,” Dekle said.


    Turbinator II clocks 435-mph run at World of Speed on Bonneville Salt Flats


    While Speed Week in mid-August is the major land speed racing event on the Bonneville Salt Flats east of Wendover, there are a number of smaller events running through the first week of October.Rick Vesco’s Turbinator, which holds the record for the...

    While Speed Week in mid-August is the major land speed racing event on the Bonneville Salt Flats east of Wendover, there are a number of smaller events running through the first week of October.

    Rick Vesco’s Turbinator, which holds the record for the fastest time recorded by a wheeled vehicle, was back on the salt for the recent World of Speed event sponsored by the Utah Salt Flats Racing Association.

    Team Vesco’s Turbinator II made four runs with an average speed of 420 mph and a top time of 435 mph, the fastest at the meet.

    The car did have a problem with a fuel pump shaft that shut down the car on one of the runs and a computer timing glitch on another run, according to team spokesperson Jinx Vesco.

    The vehicle is being driven by Eric Ritter, a new driver this year.

    The team plans to return to the Southern California Timing Association’s World Finals at Bonneville Oct. 3 through 6. That event is open to the public. Though smaller than Speed Week, it draws many of the fastest cars because the cooler temperatures help create faster times.

    Jinx Vesco said the salt course was a bit better than Speed Week due to careful grooming, but there were only four good miles due to deteriorating conditions.

    “It is extremely rough after that,” she said. “The salt is disappearing at an alarming rate due to the mismanagement of the BLM [Bureau of Land Management]. The high speed vehicles are looking at other countries now for international record setting.”

    Kirby: We went digging for desert crystals, but found another kind of treasure

    Kirby: We went digging for desert crystals, but found another kind of treasure


    Sonny and I were sentenced to hard labor on a rock pile last Saturday. Our crime — apparently not having enough to do.We drove out to Topaz Mountain in Juab County, 70 miles west of Nephi. Sonny’s wife, Sue, came along to provide medical treatment...

    Sonny and I were sentenced to hard labor on a rock pile last Saturday. Our crime — apparently not having enough to do.

    We drove out to Topaz Mountain in Juab County, 70 miles west of Nephi. Sonny’s wife, Sue, came along to provide medical treatment and adult responsibility. Even so, things started with a big explosion.

    At 10 a.m., Topaz Mountain Adventures set off charges intended to fracture the caldera of a volcano so ancient that its age can only be generally measured in church meeting time.

    The person setting off the explosives was professional explosives handler Dave Stemmons of Topaz Mountain Adventures. His job was to fracture the rock, allowing access to the gemstone Utah Topaz.

    As I understood it, topaz is formed in “vugs” or cavities in rhyolite rock. I don’t know where the word “vug” comes from, or why they don’t just be serious and use the more easily understood word “cavity.”

    Indeed, a lot of the science behind how topaz is formed escapes me. But like other incomprehensible things, such as peace and love, it’s both beautiful and well worth the search.

    Never mind all of that. Before the excavation could begin, the self-described “witch of the mountain,” Ronda Stemmons, delivered a safety lecture just short of a physical threat. I don’t remember all the rules she covered (a condition that I’ve suffered from all my life) but I do recall these:

    • No running in the quarry. Not only is the rock loose and prone to slippage, but blood tends to obscure the sherry-colored topaz crystals.

    • Leave the wildlife alone. Do not pull the tails off her lizards, bother her snakes or peg rocks at her squirrels.

    • Stay hydrated. The last thing anyone wants to do is stop hunting topaz just to drag your inert body down the hill to some shade.

    Once the dust had cleared, we were allowed to climb up into the quarry and begin battering rocks into further submission.

    Our co-convicts were members of the Burton family from Davis County. I didn’t bother to get the names of the adults, but I did the kids. Mainly because I was fascinated by the sight of adolescents with hammers and chisels in their hands instead of iPhones. You just don’t see it that often anymore.

    First, I worked with Elsie Burton, 11. I asked her if she was having fun. She said, “I guess.” That’s about all she said because she’s well-trained. Girls her age don’t warm up to strange, piratical-looking old men right away.

    Then I chipped away with Chase, 11, and Austen, 9, both of whom seemed to take to breaking stuff like the adolescent boys they are. Smashing things is about as fun as something can get.

    Finally, there was Addie, 9, who I worked with the most. She didn’t mind that I prattled on about the unfairness of The Salt Lake Tribune sending me out in the middle of nowhere to break rocks. We even found some crystals together.

    After several hours, I stumbled over to Sonny and Sue. Breaking rocks with Sonny is more my style because while the possibility of injury goes up, I can scream and curse when it happens. And Sue can patch me up.

    When we broke for lunch, we ate and examined our collection of crystals in the shade of a juniper while raiding squirrels ran under our chairs for scraps.

    It’s fair to say that we found treasure in the desert, but watching the Burton family — especially the kids — I realized that they had found something greater. Memories.

    When Chase, Austen, Elsie and Addie are as old as me, they’ll have forgotten most of the childhood games they played. Things easily taken for granted are also things easily forgotten.

    But they’ll remember the internet-less day their parents hauled them out to a desolate place to look for bits of rare beauty among tons of nondigital rocks.


    Noah Feldman: The Constitution is passing the Trump stress test


    As Donald Trump’s administration enters its ninth month, it’s worth considering a surprising possibility: Things have never been better in the turbulent period since the president took office.Trump’s most blatantly unconstitutional actions, like...

    As Donald Trump’s administration enters its ninth month, it’s worth considering a surprising possibility: Things have never been better in the turbulent period since the president took office.

    Trump’s most blatantly unconstitutional actions, like the travel ban on immigrants from a number of majority Muslim nations, have been blocked by the courts. Steve Bannon, Mike Flynn and Sebastian Gorka are out of power. The reasonable generals (John Kelly, H.R. McMaster, James Mattis) are in. The repeal of the Affordable Care Act has failed (so far). A deal with Democrats on DACA, the policy allowing undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to stay, is in the offing. There will be no wall, paid for by Mexico or otherwise, on the southern border. Dangerously extreme tax reform seems unlikely to pass.

    The point is not to play down the worrisome and downright bad events of 2017 thus far, including the fruits of mistaken Trump administration policy and (in my view) even some potentially impeachable offenses. Nor is it to ignore future risks.

    Rather, this is a moment to appreciate that the U.S. Constitution is undergoing a stress test -- and it’s doing pretty well.

    The independent judiciary is withstanding a series of unprecedented assaults from the executive branch, both symbolic and actual.

    The separation of powers, which requires Trump to work with Congress, is forcing the president to tack toward the center if he wants to get legislation passed.

    And public opinion, which guides constitutional government against the backdrop of future elections, is slowly but surely pushing Trump to remove the most radical visible members of his administration and enhance the power of more moderate, responsible adults.

    Put another way, Trump broke the recent norm of Republican presidential candidates by running to the right, not to the center. And he’s still pandering to a right-wing base in his rhetoric. But when it comes to government, he’s slowly but surely starting to act more like a centrist.

    Trump has had some normal interactions with the judicial branch when it comes to appointments. He has added a highly conservative justice, Neil Gorsuch, to the U.S. Supreme Court, which may be his most lasting contribution to conservativism. And it’s a big deal, especially because the Senate blocked President Barack Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland, in violation of a strong tradition of voting on presidential nominees.

    The rupture to unwritten constitutional norms here was Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s, not Trump’s. And Gorsuch, while conservative, is in no way out of the conservative judicial mainstream.

    Similarly, Trump’s lower court judicial nominees have for the most part been sober and qualified. They’re conservative, to be sure, but that’s perfectly normal for a Republican president blessed with a Republican Senate.

    The existing judiciary has given Trump no ground at all when it comes to his attempts to expand executive power illegitimately or in the exercise of racial bias. This despite -- or maybe because of -- Trump’s dangerous Twitter attacks on judges and the very notion of judicial authority. The pardon of Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona, is the most extreme instance of contempt for the rule of law, but it hasn’t cowed the judiciary.

    Then there’s Congress, which for different reasons hasn’t given Trump much of what he has wanted thus far. It’s important to remember that this is the most crucial element of the separation of powers. We are not ruled by Trump, because the president doesn’t rule us. At most he governs, and that in conjunction with Congress.

    That a Republican Congress hasn’t given Trump a major legislative victory in eight months is a kind of miracle of constitutional design. There is much to be said about it, but put simplistically, it shows that even the constitutional wrong of partisan gerrymandering can’t entirely sink the democratic system.

    Republicans have tremendous advantages in the House, but they don’t vote as a bloc -- the party still spans a broad spectrum from center-right to far-right. The same is true in the Senate, where unequal representation is built into the Constitution itself.

    Trump’s failure to get the Affordable Care Act repealed is therefore partly caused by the constitutional structure itself. Ditto for his need to go to the Democrats to pass legislation to keep the government funded and provide hurricane aid.

    Finally, Trump’s slow, tentative movement toward the center -- not in rhetoric but in action -- is also a result of the constitutional pressure on the only nationally elected official to satisfy the median voter.

    Trump himself is protean, able to sympathize with radical populism even while entrusting economic policy to investment bankers. He won’t give up the goal of preserving his far-right base by symbolic means. There will be more events like his dog-whistling after the Virginia white supremacist rally in the future.

    Yet when push comes to shove, Trump has to accomplish things to get re-elected. And the nationalist policies pursued by Bannon aren’t realistic or advisable.

    That explains the rise of the disciplined, more moderate, even technocratic generals in the administration. The White House has to be run -- hence Kelly taking the chief of staff role. Foreign policy actually matters -- hence the survival of McMaster as national security adviser notwithstanding the Bannon-led coup attempt against him. Allies need reassurance that “America first” doesn’t mean they will be abandoned -- hence Mattis’s role as the voice of calm and continuity at the Defense Department.

    This, too, is the effect of our constitutional system’s embrace of first-past-the-post elections. Trump found a way to activate the far right in the election. But they can’t re-elect him on their own.

    So don’t celebrate Trump. But do celebrate the Constitution. It’s being challenged. And it’s doing all right.

    - Noah Feldman is a Bloomberg View columnist. He is a professor of constitutional and international law at Harvard University and was a clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter. His seven books include “The Three Lives of James Madison: Genius, Partisan, President” and “Cool War: The Future of Global Competition.”

    Commentary: Utahns are in denial about their health


    Utahns are in denial.In the first ever Get Healthy Utah Values Study (2017), 1,012 respondents guessed that 45 percent of the state’s residents were overweight or obese. In reality, the figure is over 60 percent.Survey-takers also mischaracterized...

    Utahns are in denial.

    In the first ever Get Healthy Utah Values Study (2017), 1,012 respondents guessed that 45 percent of the state’s residents were overweight or obese. In reality, the figure is over 60 percent.

    Survey-takers also mischaracterized their own weight. Only 11 percent considered themselves obese, when roughly 25 percent actually are. Respondents also believed themselves to be healthier than their neighbors  Yet only half of Utahns report that they get the recommended amount of physical activity each week. And while a majority of Utahns claim to eat well, most research shows conclusively that they do not. This is striking in light of recent research that shows one-third of dementia cases may be preventable by addressing things like obesity, diabetes and physical inactivity. 

    No amount of self-deception, however, will change the gravity of the state’s current health crisis. Over the past three decades, the rate of obesity in Utah has skyrocketed, just as it has throughout the United States  According to the Utah Department of Health, if current trends hold, Utah’s adult obesity rate will rise from 25 percent today to 46 percent in 2050 – totaling some 1.7 million people just over 30 years from now. This level of obesity will have a catastrophic impact not only on the state’s health, but on its economy. Yet tellingly, when asked about Utah’s top priorities moving forward, respondents ranked obesity dead last. 

    The news, however, is not all bad.The Get Healthy Utah Values Study suggests changes that could motivate Utahns to modify their behavior and improve their health. For instance, Utahns see time and convenience as the primary barriers to physical activity and better nutrition. In light of these concerns, strategies that prioritize safe places to walk and bike, and that improve access to healthy foods, ought to become a top priority for improving health in Utah.

    But perhaps more to the point, the Get Healthy Utah Values Study demonstrates that better health and lower rates of obesity are crucial to helping Utahns successfully pursue their top-ranked priorities. Utah’s millennials and baby boomers, for instance, put a high premium on their own quality of life. Middle-aged Utahns, by contrast, gave their highest rankings to time with family and friends, along with the ability to help provide for loved ones.

    When Utahns eat well and are physically active, they are more likely to maintain a proper weight, avoid disease, live longer, and enjoy better physical and mental health – all of which, research suggests, are crucial to improving both individual quality of life and lasting bonds among family and friends. In short, the future happiness of Utahns, as Utahns themselves define it, is tied inextricably to their health.

    The Get Healthy Utah Values study was commission by Get Healthy Utah, a non-profit organization working to create a culture of health through encouraging and facilitating active lifestyles and healthy eating, and conducted by Envision Utah and Heart and Mind Strategies. The study not only helps us understand what Utahns believe about their own health, it offers a blueprint for building a culture of active lifestyles and healthy eating.  Whether or not individuals, communities, and policy makers in Utah realize it, fostering such a culture will be vital to the state’s future.  

    Sarah Hodson, MS, is executive director of Get Healthy Utah.

    Salt Lake City chef will compete on ‘Best Baker in America’ series


    Salt Lake City baker Adalberto Diaz Labrada is one of eight contestants who will compete for the $25,000 grand prize on the next season of “Best Baker in America.”The reality-show competition premieres Wednesday, Sept. 27, on Food Network. Check...

    Salt Lake City baker Adalberto Diaz Labrada is one of eight contestants who will compete for the $25,000 grand prize on the next season of “Best Baker in America.”

    The reality-show competition premieres Wednesday, Sept. 27, on Food Network. Check local listings for times.

    Diaz, owner of Fillings and Emulsions, may have the edge over his competition as he was a finalist for the 2015 “Holiday Baking Championship” where he consistently impressed judges with his baking skills, a craft he learned while growing up in Cuba.

    In each of the six episodes, the bakers compete in a skills challenge and a master challenge that tests their culinary know-how and their ability to work under pressure. Each week, judges send one baker home until a winner is crowned.

    Diaz’s fellow competitors hail from North Carolina, Illinois, Mississippi, California, Texas and Massachusetts.

    Head to the Firehouse in Sugar House for smokin’ good meats with a surprise twist

    Head to the Firehouse in Sugar House for smokin’ good meats with a surprise twist


    What do you get when you mix barbecue, Thai curry and coffee? 565 Firehouse in Salt Lake City’s Sugar House district.The concept came together after new owners took over the old Bubba’s BBQ spot. They happen to run a coffee shop (Café on 1st) in the...

    What do you get when you mix barbecue, Thai curry and coffee? 565 Firehouse in Salt Lake City’s Sugar House district.

    The concept came together after new owners took over the old Bubba’s BBQ spot. They happen to run a coffee shop (Café on 1st) in the Avenues and wanted another location. But guests kept asking for barbecue, so they fired up the smoker and gave them what they wanted — with a Thai twist. Welcome to fusion barbecue!

    565 Firehouse meats are smoked low and slow over apple wood and hard woods in the back of the restaurant. Portions are plentiful, and as at most barbecue joints, you can purchase everything by the pound, including brisket (½ pound $12, ¾pound $16 and 1 pound $20), ribs (½ pound $12, ¾ pound $16 and 1 pound $20), pulled pork (½ pound $10, ¾ pound $14 and 1 pound $18) and smoked chicken (½ pound $10, ¾ pound $14 and 1 pound $18). Pork ribs are also sold by the rack (¼ $12, ½ $18 and full $30).

    Make a meal of your meat by picking any combination of brisket, chicken or pulled pork and order it up as a sandwich ($9 or $10) paired with one side, a salad ($11) with fresh romaine and spinach or a combo meat plate with your choice of sides ($3 à la carte).

    Those sides include the usual barbecue offerings like slightly charred baked beans, a mustard-heavy potato salad, coleslaw, mashed potatoes and sweet cornbread along with Thai-style rice and salad.

    But here’s where the fusion barbecue comes in. Ask for the special Thai dipping sauce offered with the juicy smoked chicken or dive into the pulled pork mixed with an addictive garlic, cilantro and ranch dressing — the same delicious concoction that accompanies the side salad.

    Better still, order up the Thai yellow curry ($12) or coconut-based massaman curry ($12), which are filled with carrots and potatoes and are great on their own for Thai-loving or vegetarian diners. But add in some perfectly smoked chopped brisket or chicken and you’ve entered a new dimension of Thai barbecue — made complete with the mild spiciness of the curry and smoke of the meat.

    Pair anything on the menu with a host of hot or iced coffee drinks ($1.50 to $4.85), one of the best Thai iced teas ($2.75) I’ve come across in Utah or even a cold beer thanks to a recently earned liquor license.

    Enjoy your fusion finds on the small patio out front to take in the neighboring crossfit attendees in the evenings or simply sip your beverage while waiting for some smoked goodness to arrive. You can also sample each of the three barbecue sauces (original, tangy or Memphis) available on your table for the perfect flavor combination.

    Service at 565 Firehouse is friendly and personal, with the owner walking through the menu and answering all of our questions and table service that was attentive to our every need.

    In 565 Firehouse, diners will discover fusion barbecue flavors at their finest — blending smoked meats and Southeast Asia tastes in one small shop on 2100 South.

    Heather L. King also writes for www.slclunches.com and can be found on social media @slclunches

    565 Firehouse  *** (3 out of 4 stars)

    Food ***Mood **1/2Service ***

    Get your fill of fusion barbecue at 565 Firehouse in Sugar House. From slow-smoked meats to Thai curry and coffee drinks, this find on 2100 South will keep everyone satisfied.

    Location • 565 E. 2100 South, Salt Lake City; 801-268-3374
    Online • www.565firehouse.com
    Hours • Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 8 p.m.
    Children’s menu • Yes
    Prices • $$
    Liquor • Wine and beer
    Takeout • Yes
    Reservations • n/a
    Wheelchair access • Yes
    Outdoor dining • Yes
    On-site parking • Yes
    Credit cards • Yes


    Letter: Clinton was defeated by her own myopia


    Hillary Clinton’s latest book, “What Happened,” has hit the bookstores.To Clinton, a simple answer: You lost. You ignored trends of dissatisfaction from a large segment of the voting public. You assumed your endowment as the next president of the...

    Hillary Clinton’s latest book, “What Happened,” has hit the bookstores.

    To Clinton, a simple answer: You lost. You ignored trends of dissatisfaction from a large segment of the voting public. You assumed your endowment as the next president of the United States and you entered a basically rigged preliminary nomination process carrying more “Clintonista” baggage than an over-burdened Sherpa during a blizzard on Mount K2. And you forgot the required soliciting of votes in the heretofore neglected American hinterland.

    Now you have placed blame for your loss on everyone else, including Bernie Sanders. He hurt your chances by running for the office you presumed was yours. James Comey, former FBI director, sabotaged your effort with his farcical investigative bungling. The Democrats didn’t support you as they should have. The Republicans put up a brash, aggressive newcomer as their flag bearer. Surely an insult to your long and personally heralded legacy of major public service. Even Hollywood didn’t do enough regardless of those many high-cost “meet the candidate” soirees staged out on the West Coast. And of course there was Vladimir Putin’s Russian interference in the election process. Vice President Joe Biden comes in for some of that widespread culpability. A man many believe, had he run, might have easily defeated Trump. He supposedly undercut your expected waltz into the White House. How many excuses do you have left?

    Losing always hurts. Ask the New England Patriots of the NFL, presumably on their way to another Super Bowl when they got blitzed by the Kansas City Chiefs during the initial NFL regular season opener last week.

    Whatever becomes of the Trump tenure in office, whether he effects any real changes or becomes a listless, lame duck president for the next three years and if the Democrats achieve a measurable success in the 2018 interim elections, you were actually defeated by your inability to see beyond only your own version of what you wanted — not what the people wanted.

    James F. Oshust

    Millcreek


    From ‘Star Trek’ to ‘Dynasty,’ there’s a lot of recycling going on this fall on TV — and only so many ways to say ‘Meh’


    Everything old is new again this fall on TV.Well, a whole bunch of old ideas — even old shows — are being dusted off, adapted and/or rebooted. Not just “Will & Grace” — which returns with the same cast (and the original producers) — but new...

    Everything old is new again this fall on TV.

    Well, a whole bunch of old ideas — even old shows — are being dusted off, adapted and/or rebooted. Not just “Will & Grace” — which returns with the same cast (and the original producers) — but new versions of “Dynasty” and “S.W.A.T.” are on the schedule.

    Spike Lee is rebooting his movie “She’s Gotta Have It” as a TV series.

    Star Trek: Discovery” is the seventh such series — a sequel (of sorts) to “Enterprise” and a prequel to the other five.

    And there are spinoffs, like “Young Sheldon” (from “The Big Bang Theory”), “Marvel’s Inhumans” (from “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” sort of) and “Law & Order: The Menendez Murders” (from all the other “Law & Orders”).

    There are actually two new Marvel shows this fall; “Runaways” is based on a separate set of comic books.

    “The Gifted” is an “X-Men” series. “The Good Doctor” is an adaptation of a Korean show — and it‘s more than a bit like “House.”

    “Ghosted” is an attempt to turn “The X-Files” into a comedy. And “The Orville” is a big, honkin’ rip-off of “Star Trek.”

    Also this season, TV execs have decided that the time is right for shows about members of the military, so we’re getting “SEAL Team,” “The Brave” and “Valor.” 

    There are a few things that look like they’re worth watching and a few that are just plain bad. Most of what we’re getting lies somewhere in the middle.

    The truth is I struggled with this fall TV preview, because I had trouble coming up with so many different ways to say “Meh.”

    Here’s a look at the fall schedule:

    Thursday, Sept. 21

    THE ORVILLE” (First two episodes aired Sept. 10 and 17; moves to regular time slot Sept. 21 at 8 p.m. on Fox/Ch. 13) •  This is a “Star Trek” rip-off. It’s not a parody. It’s not even a comedy, although there are some attempts at humor. It’s a Seth MacFarlane vanity project — he gets to pretend he’s the captain of the U.S.S. Enterprise. Well, the U.S.S. Orville. He plays Capt. Ed Mercer; his first officer is also his ex-wife; and he’s surrounded by characters and situations seemingly lifted from 1990s “Trek.” This could be “Star Trek: The Next Next Generation,” I suppose.

    Is it any good? It’s not awful, which is somewhat surprising.

    Is it worth watching? If you really love science fiction that feels completely derivative and sort of cheap — sure. If you’re a Seth MacFarlane fan — maybe. Because, again, it’s not really a comedy.

    RETURNING SHOW • “The Good Place” (9 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5)

    Friday, Sept. 22

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Fuller House” (streaming, Netflix); “Transparent” (streaming, Amazon)

    Sunday, Sept. 24

    STAR TREK: DISCOVERY” (The first episode airs at 7 p.m. on CBS/Ch. 2. That and all subsequent episodes are streaming-only on subscription service CBS All Access; one episode per Sunday) •  The seventh “Trek” series (and the first in more than a dozen years) is the first that doesn’t center on a captain but on the first officer. Sonequa Martin-Green (“The Walking Dead”) stars as first officer Michael Burnham. It’s set a decade before the original series; Spock’s father, Sarek (James Frain), will appear regularly. Everything we’ve seen so far — which isn’t much — is getting Trekkies and Trekkers excited.

    Is it any good? The trailers look really cool. But the series has a rather troubled history — its debut was delayed from January to May to September. And CBS has prohibited critics from reviewing the show before it debuts. Maybe that really is because CBS wants to prevent spoilers. Or maybe it sucks.

    Is it worth watching? Well, I’m going to watch it regardless. But I’m an obsessed fan. Whether it will appeal to less-obsessed Trekkers remains TBD.

    RETURNING SHOW • “60 Minutes” (6 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2)

    Monday, Sept. 25

    “YOUNG SHELDON” (Pilot episode airs Sept. 2, at 7:30 p.m. on CBS/Ch. 2; regular time-slot premiere is Thursday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p.m.) • This is exactly what the title indicates — “The Big Bang Theory’s” Sheldon Cooper as a 9-year-old (Iain Armitage) starting high school in Texas. He’s a genius who’s clueless about people, which is awkward. This is very much a Sheldon version of “The Wonder Years” — a filmed comedy (no studio audience like “BBT”) about Sheldon, his parents and his siblings, complete with Parsons as the narrator.

    Is it any good? Armitage is great as Young Sheldon. And Zoe Perry (whose mother, Laurie Metcalf, recurs as Sheldon’s mother on “BBT”) is wonderful as Sheldon’s mom, Mary. The pilot is good, but we’ve only seen one episode and you’ve got to wonder if the premise will hold up.

    Is it worth watching ? Yes, at least for one episode. After that … stay tuned.

    “ME, MYSELF & I” (8:30 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2) • This comedy is about one character in three time periods — Alex Riley at the ages of 14 (Jack Dylan Grazer), 40 (Bobby Moynihan) and 65 (John Larroquette. He’s a teenage nerd, a middle-aged lovable loser and a successful senior citizen, but they’re all struggling with the same sorts of personal problems.

    Is it any good? The pilot is charming and funny. Just try to ignore that Moynihan is never going to turn into Larroquette.

    Is it worth watching? Yes, if for no other reason than to see where it’s headed. Oh, and it’s pretty funny.

    THE GOOD DOCTOR” (9 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4) • Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore, “Bates Motel”) is a young surgeon with autism. In the pilot, he saves a life; he’s judged unfit to be a surgeon by most of the “Grey’s Anatomy”-like staff at a San Jose hospital; and the hospital president (Richard Schiff, “The West Wing”) passionately defends him. If he doesn’t get the job, there’s no series … and there’s a series.

    Is it any good? Hoo, boy. Much of what happens in the pilot is absolutely ludicrous and mawkish. And the writers seemingly went down a checklist of attributes a person with autism might have and assigned them all to Shaun. But pilots tend to paint characters in broad strokes, so it might improve. If you were a fan of “House,” this has the same showrunner and there are definite similarities.

    Is it worth watching? If this didn’t involve a character with autism and if it couldn’t be argued that that’s a good thing, the easy answer would be no. But it’s not that easy, so — maybe.

    THE BRAVE” (9 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5) • The second-best military-themed show revolves around a team at the Defense Intelligence Agency, which collects and analyzes intel and conducts operations in other countries. In the pilot, they try to save an American and take down a terrorist — and they have trouble doing one without jeopardizing the other. Anne Heche is miscast as the DIA deputy director (the boss), and the members of the team seem, well, interchangeable might be the nicest way to put it.

    Is it any good? It’s not terrible. But it’s just sort of filling space on the schedule.

    Is it worth watching? Only if you have a lot of spare time and low expectations.

    RETURNING SHOWS  • “The Big Bang Theory” (7 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “The Voice” (7 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5); “Kevin Can Wait” (8 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “Scorpion” (9 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2)

    Tuesday, Sept. 26

    LAW & ORDER TRUE CRIME: THE MENENDEZ MURDERS” (9 p.m., NBC/ Ch. 5) • All the “Law & Order” shows have long used ripped-from-the-headlines narratives to power their plots — but this is a full-on docu-drama. It retells the story of the Menendez brothers, who murdered their parents in 1989. The narrative follows the brothers’ lawyer, Leslie Abramson, as she fights to prove that Erik and Lyle were abused by their parents, explaining — perhaps justifying — shooting them to death.

    Is it any good? This eight-episode limited series gets off to a strong start. It’s not a whodunit — we know who — it’s a whydunit. And that looks fascinating.

    Is it worth watching? I’m a sucker for true-crime dramas, and this looks like a good one.

    RETURNING SHOWS • “NCIS” (7 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “Lethal Weapon” (7 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “Bull” (8 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “This Is Us” (8 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5); “The Mick” (8 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” (8:30 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “NCIS: New Orleans” (9 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2)

    Wednesday, Sept. 27

    SEAL TEAM” (8 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2) • This is a very CBS show — a procedural. But instead of cops, it’s Navy SEALs. David Boreanaz (“Bones”) stars as the team leader, who’s great at his job — but that job as fractured his family. He’s backed up by a crew who are great at pulling off their covert missions, but all have some sort of issue they’re dealing with. And they all depend on CIA analyst Mandy Ellis (Jessica Paré).

    Is it any good? It’s the best of the three military-themed shows, but that’s not saying much. Boreanaz hardly seems to be trying, and Paré (“Mad Men”) is stuck in a thankless role.

    Is it worth watching? Not really. But there are certainly worse things on TV.

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Survivor” (7 p.m., CBS/Ch 2); “The Goldbergs” (7 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4); “The Blacklist” (7 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5); “Empire” (7 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “Speechless” (7:30 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4); “Criminal Minds” (8 p.m., CBS/Ch 2); “Modern Family” (8 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4); “Law & Order: SVU” (8 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5); “Star” (8 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “American Housewife” (8:30 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4); “Designated Survivor” (9 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4); “Chicago P.D.” (9 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5)

    Thursday, Sept. 28

    WILL & GRACE” (8 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5) • This is not a reboot, it’s a continuation that picks up 11 years after what was supposed to be the series finale. Most of the original cast is back — Eric McCormack as Will, Debra Messing as Grace, Megan Mullally as Karen and Sean Hayes as Jack. (Shelley Morrison won’t be back as Karen’s maid, Rosario, and Harry Connick Jr. isn’t returning as Grace’s on-again, off-again husband, Leo.) No new episodes have been screened for critics, but we know they’re going to explain away the finale — which flashed forward into a future that clearly doesn’t work with this revival.

    Is it any good? When “Will & Grace” premiered in 1998, it was funny and smart — the best new comedy and arguably the best new show that fall. That lasted a couple of seasons. But the show degenerated into an unfunny mess populated by increasingly unlikable characters, and clever writing was replaced by loud, crude and unfunny jokes.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Grey’s Anatomy”(7 p.m., ABC, Ch. 4); “How to Get Away With Murder”(9 p.m., ABC, Ch. 4); “Superstore”(7 p.m., NBC, Ch. 5); “Great News”(8:30 p.m., NBC, Ch. 5); “Chicago Fire”(9 p.m., NBC, Ch. 5)

    Friday, Sept. 29

    “TIN STAR” (Streaming, Amazon) • Tim Roth stars as Jim Worth, a Brit who moves with his family to the Canadian Rockies and takes a job as a small-town police chief. Things are far from idyllic, however, because a Big Evil Oil Company comes to town, and the migrant workers bring a crime wave with them. Frustrated by everything that‘s happening, Worth becomes a vigilante.

    Is it any good? Roth and Christina Hendricks (“Mad Men”), who plays the Big Oil representative, are great, and this has the makings of a good, moody, dark drama.

    Is it worth watching? Could be. This is Amazon, so you’ll be able to watch all 10 episodes in a day, if you wish.

    “MARVEL‘S INHUMANS” (7 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4) • This isn’t really a spinoff of “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” it’s sort of a parallel series. A bunch of superhumans with mutant powers live on the moon. And, after a coup, the Inhuman Royal Family ends up in Hawaii. With their giant dog. And it’s dumber than that description makes it sound.

    Is it any good? Nope. It’s terrible. Stilted. Dumb. Awkward. Bad special effects. Need I go on?

    Is it worth watching? Nope. It’s this fall’s worst new show.

    RETURNING SHOWS • “MacGyver” (7 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “Hell’s Kitchen”(7 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “Hawaii Five-0”(8 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “The Exorcist”(8 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “Blue Bloods”(9 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “Z Nation”(10 p.m., Syfy)

    Saturday, Sept. 30

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Saturday Night Live”(10:30 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5); “48 Hours” (9 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “Versailles”(9 p.m., Ovation,)

    Sunday, Oct. 1

    GHOSTED” (7:30 p.m. Fox/Ch. 13) • A scientist (Adam Scott) who believes in aliens, ghosts, etc., teams up with an ex-cop (Craig Robinson) who thinks it’s all B.S. to investigate paranormal happenings for The Bureau Underground in this half-hour comedy. And, yes, it’s an attempt to turn “The X-Files” into a sitcom.

    Is it any good? I like Scott and Robinson, and the pilot is handsomely produced. But all the humor falls flat — so it’s a comedy that’s not funny.

    Is it worth watching? No, unfortunately.

    WISDOM OF THE CROWD” (7:30 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2; moves to regular timeslot at 8 p.m. on Oct. 8) • After his daughter is murdered, tech billionaire Jeffrey Tanner (Jeremy Piven) sells his company and devotes himself and his tech skills to hunting down her killer. And other criminals. Channeling “Person of Interest,” and partnering with a hugely skeptical cop (Richard T. Jones), Tanner and his team of young techsters come up with a way to use crowd-sourcing to hunt down bad guys.

    Is it any good? This is an odd time for a show that puts forth a billionaire as a savior — not just because “APB” and “Pure Genius” both bombed last year, but because Donald Trump keeps setting records for unpopularity. And this is another earnest procedural on CBS that’s just sort of “meh.”

    Is it worth watching? It’s not godawful or anything — but, no.

    TEN DAYS IN THE VALLEY” (9 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4) • Kyra Sedgwick stars as Jane, the producer of a TV crime drama that seems not dissimilar from Sedgwick’s last show, “The Closer.” Which is a little weird. Jane is a single mother whose young daughter is kidnapped, setting off a seasonlong hunt. And the detective on the case (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje) is suspicious of Jane because, well, she keeps lying to him.

    Is it any good? This wants to be Serious Drama; it’s more like Bad Soap Opera.

    Is it worth watching? Maybe if you’ve never had a child, you might find some entertainment value in a show about a kidnapped child. In other words — NO.

    RETURNING SHOWS • “The Toy Box” (6 p.m, ABC/Ch. 4); “Bob’s Burgers“ (6:30 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “Shark Tank” (7 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4); “The Simpsons“ (7 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “NCIS: Los Angeles“ (8 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “Poldark“ (8 p.m., PBS/Ch. 7); “Family Guy“ (8 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “The Last Man on Earth“ (8:30 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13); “Curb Your Enthusiasm“ (10 p.m., HBO)

    Monday, Oct. 2

    9JKL” (7:30 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2) • This loud sitcom is based on star Mark Feuerstein’s experiences when he was starring in “Royal Pains.” He plays Josh, an actor whose network show (about a blind cop) has been canceled and whose wife just divorced him. So he moves back to Manhattan, where he lives in apartment 9K, between his overbearing parents (Elliott Gould and Linda Lavin) in 9J and his brother (David Walton), sister-in-law and their baby in 9L. And hilarity is supposed to ensue.

    Is it any good? I like the cast, and it’s beyond cute that the creator/writer/executive producer is Feuerstein’s real-life wife, Dana Klein. But this is painfully unfunny. It’s a chore to sit through.

    Is it worth watching? Sadly, no.

    THE GIFTED” (8 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13) • They never say “X-Men” in this, but it’s an X-Men series nonetheless. It’s co-produced by Marvel, and it’s based on the original “X-Men” comic books. It’s set in a world where mutants exist, people are afraid of them and the government wants to round them up. Stephen Moyer stars as a guy who prosecutes mutants, but he and his wife (Amy Acker) end up on the run when it turns out their two teenage children (Natalie Alyn Lind and Percy Hynes White) are mutants. And they get help from an underground mutant network.

    Is it any good? The pilot is pretty good, if entirely familiar to anyone who’s at all familiar with “X-Men.” Whether the premise holds up beyond the first hour is the big question.

    Is it worth watching? I’m extremely skeptical. But if you’re a big “X-Men” fan, you’ll probably want to check out a few episodes.

    “THE HALCYON” (9 p.m., Ovation) • This British series is set in a five-star London hotel in 1940 — shortly before German bombs started falling. Basically, it‘s a big soap opera with British accents.

    Is it any good? It’s OK. But at this point, it really doesn’t matter. The U.K. network that aired the show canceled it after one season and eight episodes.

    Is it worth watching? Be warned — it ends on a cliffhanger that will never be resolved.

    RETURNING SHOW • “Lucifer” (7 p.m., Fox/Ch. 13)

    Tuesday, Oct. 3

    “THE MAYOR” (8:30 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4) • Courtney Rose (Brandon Michael Hall) is a young man who really wants to be a big-time rapper. So as a publicity stunt, he runs for mayor of his hometown. And he’s flummoxed when he wins. He gets some help from his former classmate, Valentina (Lea Michele), who was the campaign manager for his opponent (David Spade). And Courtney’s mom (Yvette Nicole Brown) offers encouragement and tough love.

    Is it any good? The premise is strong. The cast is good. If only it were funnier. Because the first episode isn’t as funny as it should be.

    Is it worth watching? It’s worth a chance. It has possibilities.

    “KEVIN (PROBABLY) CHANGES THE WORLD” (9 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4) • Kevin Finn‘s (Jason Ritter) life has fallen apart. He has returned to his rural hometown and moved in with his sister, Amy (Joanna Garcia Swisher), and teenage niece, Reese (Chloe East), who are mourning the recent death of their husband/father. Things get weird when a meteorite strikes nearby, and — while investigating — Kevin is contacted by what seems to be an angel, Yvette (Kimberly Hebert Gregory), who tells him he has to help save humanity.

    Is it any good? It’s not as good as you’d hope. Ritter and the rest of the cast are certainly likable; “Kevin” tries to be heartfelt and somehow meaningful — but it just doesn’t come together.

    Is it worth watching? It has a few good moments, but only a few. Barring some serious improvements — no.

    RETURNING SHOWS • “The Middle“ (7 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4); “Fresh Off the Boat“(7:30 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4);“ Black-ish“ (8 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4)

    Thursday, Oct. 5

    RETURNING SHOWS  • “Scandal” (8 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4); “Van Helsing” (10 p.m., Syfy)

    Friday, Oct. 6

    SUPERSTITION”( Friday, Oct. 6, 10 p.m., Syfy) • Holy “Six Feet Under”! This supernatural drama follows the Hasting family, who operate the only funeral home in their small town. They not only provide services for the dearly departed, but, according to Syfy, they handle “afterlife care” for the “unexplained deaths of folks at the hands of demonic entities and other unworldly phenomena that have long haunted the town.”

    Is it any good? Haven’t seen anything yet.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    RETURNING SHOW • “Once Upon a Time” (7 p.m., ABC/Ch. 4)

    Monday, Oct. 9

    VALOR” (8 p.m., The CW/Ch. 30) • The worst of the military shows is more soapy than the “Dynasty” reboot. It’s not just about a covert operation involving helicopter pilots that went terribly wrong in Somalia, a big cover-up and a secret plot of some sort — there’s also a ridiculous love triangle and characters who seemingly transferred in from “The Young and the Restless.”

    Is it any good? No. It’s terrible. Not just the worst of the three military-themed shows, but one of the worst new shows period.

    Is it worth watching? Absolutely not.

    RETURNING SHOW •  “Supergirl” (7 p.m., CW/ Ch. 30)

    Tuesday, Oct. 10

    RETURNING SHOWS • “The Flash” (7 p.m., CW/Ch. 30); “DC‘s Legends of Tomorrow” (8 p.m., CW/Ch. 30)

    Wednesday, Oct. 11

    “DYNASTY” (8 p.m., CW/Ch. 30) • It‘s ba-ack! OK, it‘s not a continuation or a sequel to the 1980s megasoap, it’s a reboot that updates the plot and the characters. Billionaire Blake Carrington (Grant Show) marries a much-younger woman, Cristal (Nathalie Kelley), and makes her COO of his company. That really ticks off his ambitious daughter, Fallon (Elisabeth Gillies), who figures she should be in charge. This time around, gay son Steven Carrington (James Mackay) is not closeted; Sammy Jo (originally played by Heather Locklear) still gets involved with Steven, but this time he’s a gay man (Rafael de la Fuente); Jeff Colby (Sam Adegoke) and the chauffeur, Michael (Robert Christopher Riley), are both black — and, while Blake’s first wife, Alexis, is mentioned, she’s not on the show. Yet.

    Is it any good? No one is ever going to mistake “Dynasty” for fine drama, but it’s very entertaining. Fans of the original will be amused; those too young to remember the ’80s will be entertained by this soap with a sense of humor. Hey, there’s a catfight in the first episode!

    Is it worth watching? Yes. I’m in!

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Riverdale” (7 p.m., CW/Ch. 30); “Mr. Robot” (10 p.m., USA); “The Shannara Chronicles” (8 p.m., Spike); “Chance” (Streaming, Hulu)

    Thursday, Oct. 12

    “I LOVE YOU, AMERICA” (Streaming, Hulu) • Comedian Sarah Silverman travels around the United States in this comedy/reality show, meeting all sorts of people.

    Is it any good? I’ve only seen a clip of Silverman in Louisiana having dinner with people who had never met a Jewish person … but it was a funny clip.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Supernatural”(7 p.m., CW/Ch. 30); “Arrow”(8 p.m., CW/Ch. 30)

    Friday, Oct. 13

    MINDHUNTER”  (Streaming, Netflix) • In this period piece (set in 1979), a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) interview imprisoned serial killers to help them hunt down serial killers who are still on the loose. It‘s based on the book “Mindhunter: Inside FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit” by Mark Olshaker and John E. Douglas.

    Is it any good? I’ve only seen a couple of trailers. But it is executive produced by David Fincher (“House of Cards,” “Fight Club,” “Gone Girl”), who also directed the first two episodes, so there’s reason for optimism.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” (7 p.m., CW/Ch. 30); “Jane the Virgin” (8 p.m., CW/Ch. 30)

    Saturday, Oct. 14

    RETURNING SHOW •  “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency” (10 p.m., BBC America)

    Sunday, Oct. 15

    WHITE FAMOUS” (11 p.m., Showtime) • Jay Pharoah (“SNL”) stars in this comedy as a fictionalized version of (executive producer) Jamie Foxx’s life back when the Oscar winner first became famous to a wide audience — of white people.

    Is it any good? Well, the showrunner also ran “Californication.” And the trailer looks sort of funny. But you can‘t actually judge a show by its trailer.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Good Behavior” (7 p.m., TNT, Season 2); “The Dorrells in Corfu” (7 p.m., PBS/Ch. 7); “Berlin Station” (9 p.m., Epix)

    Tuesday, Oct. 17

    HIT THE ROAD” (8 p.m. DirecTV‘s Audience Network) • This is basically a raunchy version of “The Partridge Family,” with Jason Alexander as the father/manager of a family band traveling around in a broken-down tour bus.

    Is it any good? No. It’s terrible.

    Is it worth watching? Nope. It’s terrible.

    LOUDERMILK” (8:30 p.m., DirecTV’s Audience Network) • Ron Livingston stars as Sam Loudermilk, a former music journalist who has gone from drunk to recovering alcoholic. But he remains an unlikable jerk.

    Is it any good? It’s supposed to be funny, but it’s not. Which is a problem for a comedy.

    Is it worth watching? No.

    Wednesday, Oct. 18

    “DO YOU WANT TO SEE A DEAD BODY?” (Streaming, YouTube Red) • In this fake reality show, Rob Huebel takes celebrities on adventures — like going to see a dead body (à la “Stand By Me”). The guests include John Cho, Terry Crews, Judy Greer and Adam Scott.

    Is it any good? You’ll either love it or you’ll hate it. There’s not a lot of middle ground. And I kind of hate it.

    Is it worth watching? Only if you’re a big Rob Huebel fan.

    RETURNING SHOW • “Freakish”(Streaming, Hulu)

    Sunday, Oct. 22

    RETURNING SHOWS •  “Graves” (9 p.m., Epix); “The Walking Dead” (10 p.m., AMC)

    Tuesday, Oct. 24

    THE LAST O.G.” (8 p.m., TBS) • This sitcom stars Tracy Morgan as an ex-con who, after a long stretch in prison, returns home to Brooklyn to find it gentrified; learns his ex-girlfriend gave birth to twins after he went away; and finds that his ex is married to a white guy.

    Is it any good? Don’t know yet. But Jordan Peele is the creator and one of the executive producers, so there’s reason to be optimistic.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    “AT HOME WITH AMY SEDARIS” (8:30 p.m., TruTV) • Sedaris hosts this comedy/DIY show, which mixes crafts, homemaking, cooking, entertaining, celebrity guests — like Stephen Colbert, Jane Krakowski, Rachel Dratch and Paul Giamatti — with general goofiness.

    Is it any good? The clips are very funny. And Sedaris is always a hoot.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    Wednesday, Oct. 25

    RETURNING SHOW •  “Rosehaven” (11 p.m., SundanceTV)

    Friday, Oct. 27

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Blindspot”(7 p.m., NBC/Ch. 5); “Stranger Things”(Streaming, Netflix)

    Monday, Oct. 30

    RETURNING SHOW • “Superior Donuts” (8 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2)

    Tuesday, Oct. 31

    RETURNING SHOW • “Major Crimes” (7 p.m., TNT)

    Wednesday, Nov. 1

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Stan Against Evil” (9 p.m., IFC); “Foursome” (Streaming, YouTube Red)

    Thursday, Nov. 2

    S.W.A.T.” (9 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2) • About the only thing this new series shares with the 1975-76 ABC show and the 2003 theatrical film is the title. Oh, and it is also about the LAPD’s Special Weapons and Tactics team. In the pilot, the head of the team (a white man) shoots an innocent teenager (a black kid) and is replaced by Daniel “Hondo” Harrison (Shemar Moore, “Criminal Minds”). He’s a good guy and a good cop. Oh, and he’s having an affair with his boss.

    Is it any good? Somewhat surprisingly, yes. It’s filled with shootouts and car chases; the cast is appealing; and it’s engaging enough to overcome its cop-show clichés.

    Is it worth watching? It’s certainly worth watching the first episode. It’s not great drama, but the pilot is fun to watch. We’ll see where it goes.

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Mom” (8 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2); “Life in Pieces” (8:30 p.m., CBS/Ch. 2)

    Friday, Nov. 3

    ALIAS GRACE” (Streaming, Netflix) • Based on the book by Margaret Atwood (“The Handmaid’s Tale”), this is the fictionalized story of a maid, Grace Marks, who was accused of killing her employer and his mistress in 1843.

    Is it any good? The clips look interesting.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    Sunday, Nov. 5

    SMILF” (11 p.m., Showtime) • Frankie Shaw turns her short film of the same name — which won the 2015 Short Film Jury Award at Sundance — into a half-hour comedy. It’s loosely based on her life as a single mother struggling to build a career. Rosie O’Donnell and Connie Britton co-star.

    Is it any good? The short film was good. The trailer is good (but filled with f-bombs, so it’s not attached). We’ll see.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    RETURNING SHOWS • “Shameless” (10 p.m., Showtime); “The Ride with Norman Reedus” (11 p.m., AMC); “The Girlfriend Experience” (11 p.m., Starz)

    Tuesday, Nov. 7

    RETURNING SHOW • “Teachers” (11 p.m., TV Land)

    Tuesday, Nov. 14

    FUTURE MAN” (Streaming, Hulu) • From producers Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg (“Preacher”), this comedy stars Josh Hutcherson (“Hunger Games”) as a janitor/gamer/slacker who is recruited by time travelers to try to help save humanity.

    Is it any good? TBD

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    Sunday, Nov. 19

    RETURNING SHOW • “Search Party” (8 p.m., TBS)

    Tuesday, Nov. 21

    “MARVEL‘S RUNAWAYS” (Streaming, Hulu) • The producers of “The O.C.,” “Gossip Girl” and the new version of “Dynasty” go full-on superheroes with this adaptation of the comic books about six teenagers with superpowers who team up to fight their supervillain parents.

    Is it any good? TBD

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    Wednesday, Nov. 22

    “GODLESS” (Streaming, Netflix) • Western about a notorious criminal (Jeff Daniels) and his gang who seek revenge against an ex-protégé (Jack O’Connell) who has taken refuge with a widow (Michelle Dockery) in a town populated mostly by women.
    Steven Soderbergh is producing; Scott Frank (“Out of Sight”) is the writer/director.

    Is it any good? TBD

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    Thursday, Nov. 23

    SHE’S GOTTA HAVE IT” (Streaming, Netflix) • This was Spike Lee’s first film back in 1986; he’s rebooting it as a 10-episode TV series about a Brooklyn artist (DeWanda Wise) who is juggling a variety of very different men.

    Is it any good? The clip doesn’t tell us much.

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    Wednesday, Nov. 29

    HAPPY!” (TBA, Syfy) • This is based on the comic books of the same title. We haven’t seen anything yet; here is Syfy’s description: “The series follows Nick Sax (Christopher Meloni, “SVU”) — an intoxicated, corrupt ex-cop turned hit man — who is adrift in a world of casual murder, soulless sex and betrayal. After a hit gone wrong, his inebriated life is forever changed by a tiny, relentlessly positive, imaginary blue winged horse named Happy (Patton Oswalt).”

    Is it any good? TBD

    Is it worth watching? TBD

    News roundup: Why are Republicans in a rush to pass a new health care law this month?


    Why are Republicans in a rush to pass a new health care law this month? Utah lawmakers are again looking at a bill to remove mentally incapacitated officials from office. Lawmakers pass bills to back Operation Rio Grande.Happy Thursday. Republicans have...

    Why are Republicans in a rush to pass a new health care law this month? Utah lawmakers are again looking at a bill to remove mentally incapacitated officials from office. Lawmakers pass bills to back Operation Rio Grande.

    Happy Thursday. Republicans have tried — and failed — several times to repeal and replace Obamacare but now are attempting to push through a new health care bill within a week. It’s still unclear how the bill would impact health care in America but the GOP isn’t planning to wait until the Congressional Budget Office gives its report. Why the rush? The answer is lies in a combination of Republican legislative strategy, arcane Senate procedure and ordinary partisan divisions. [WaPost]

    Topping the news: State lawmakers passed legislation to support Operation Rio Grande and help find a solution to downtown Salt Lake City’s homeless problem. [Trib]

    -> Utah lawmakers are looking another time at passing a new law that would allow the removal of elected officials deemed mentally unfit for their jobs, but this one would only apply to counties with a council form of government. [Trib] [DNews]

    -> Polygamist Lyle Jeffs pleaded guilty Tuesday to one count of defrauding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and one count of failure to appear in court. [Trib] [DNews]

    Tweets of the day: From @EvanMcS: “a DC private jet scandal feels like a warm comfortable blanket sewn from the finest normalcy.”

    -> From @seungminkim: “Sen. Murkowski, how are you? @lisamurkowski: “You know ... I’m not going to answer that question.” #exclusive #mustcredit“

    Happy birthday: To former state Rep. Rep. Kay McIff and Bailey Bowthorpe of the Salt Lake Chamber.

    In other news: The Salt Lake City Airport Advisory Board recommended a street-level extension of TRAX, a move that would save more than $50 million. [Trib]

    -> Alleged fraudster Rick Koerber testified in court that even during the Great Recession people were begging him to take their money. [Trib]

    -> Rep. Craig Hall is drafting legislation to specify when a police officer may draw blood without a victim’s consent. [Trib]

    -> State Sen. Daniel Thatcher has opened a bill file to create a three-digit number similar to 911 for suicide prevention. [DNews]

    -> Rep. Paul Ray failed in an attempt to halt a change to how the state’s court system decides bail. [Trib]

    -> The Murray City Council picked Douglas Blair Camp to serve as interim mayor. [Trib]

    -> Robert Gehrke laments the tearing down of his alma mater Granite High School and other old buildings often replaced with shiny glass structures devoid of soul. [Trib]

    -> Pat Bagley offers his take on the Graham-Cassidy health care bill. [Trib]

    Nationally: Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price last week took private jets on five separate flights for official business, at a cost of tens of thousands of dollars more than commercial travel. [Politico]

    -> Special counsel Robert Mueller is asking for a slew of documents from the White House about some of President Donald Trump’s more controversial decisions, including the firing of his national security adviser and FBI director. [NYTimes]

    -> Less than two weeks before Donald Trump accepted the Republican presidential nomination, campaign Chairman Paul Manafort offered to provide briefings on the race to a Russian billionaire closely aligned with the Kremlin. [WaPost]

    Got a tip? A birthday, wedding or anniversary to announce? Email us at [email protected]. If you haven’t already, sign up for our weekday email and get this sent directly to your inbox.

    -- Thomas Burr: Twitter.com/thomaswburr

    Letter: Mormons aren't the only ones who help


    The Sept. 4 edition of The Tribune had the most unusual headline on its front page.It read, in very large bold letters, that “It’s our mission to help others” above a picture of the damage of Hurricane Harvey in Texas. It was a very long article...

    The Sept. 4 edition of The Tribune had the most unusual headline on its front page.

    It read, in very large bold letters, that “It’s our mission to help others” above a picture of the damage of Hurricane Harvey in Texas. It was a very long article from front page to an inside page about an LDS leader visiting Houston.

    What makes this headline and article strange to me is that there are many churches and religions in Utah. I am sure that many of them have donated, sent items, went to volunteer in Texas and did everything they could to help others. It’s not just the LDS Church’s mission to help others, it is the mission of all churches and all groups and organizations who gather to help people. For example, the Red Cross, animal rescue folks, specially trained rescue squads from the fire department, medical professionals, National Guard and on and on.

    To put such a large misleading and exclusive headline on the front page of The Salt Lake Tribune, which is The Independent Voice of Utah, is not appropriate. Please remember that Utah consists of an amazing mix of people, organizations, and churches whose mission and desire it is to help others.

    Dini Droguett

    Murray


    Letter: Make the link to climate change


    In the recent events with Hurricane Harvey, there have been relatively few reports of the augmented effects of climate change on Hurricane Harvey. I believe the victims of Harvey should receive proper respect and coverage for the damage incurred.The...

    In the recent events with Hurricane Harvey, there have been relatively few reports of the augmented effects of climate change on Hurricane Harvey. I believe the victims of Harvey should receive proper respect and coverage for the damage incurred.

    The hurricane was worsened by a warming ocean (causing increased evaporation) and ocean rise (causing increased potential and, in this case, flooding). Not that the science has ever been lacking, however. The National Academy of Sciences recently arrived at a consensus statement that extreme weather events are attributable to climate change. Journalists and publications that continue to report on extreme events without mentioning climate change exacerbate climate denial, and likely contribute to worsening storms in the U.S. and throughout the globe.

    We need strong journalism that is willing to report on science and the effects on our world. Without this journalism, we fall prey to what the powers that be want us to believe with their faux science. Please connect climate change and Harvey for the Salt Lake City population. Thank you.

    Joel Wenger

    Cottonwood Heights

    Letter: Time to speak up on ADU zoning


    Salt Lake City’s Planning Department and the City Council are moving to amend the accessory dwelling unit ordinance in which ADUs (rental units) are only currently allowed in homes zoned as a single-family home within a half mile of TRAX. Recently, as...

    Salt Lake City’s Planning Department and the City Council are moving to amend the accessory dwelling unit ordinance in which ADUs (rental units) are only currently allowed in homes zoned as a single-family home within a half mile of TRAX. Recently, as result of a 4-3 vote, the City Council is drafting a proposal to allow ADUs in all homes in Salt Lake City currently zoned for single-family homes, which would eliminate single-family home zoning throughout the city.

    If the proposal is approved, an ADU can be up to half the size of the dwelling and constructed within four feet of your property.

    In some cases, allowing ADUs in a neighborhood would increase traffic, noise, safety and on-street parking (which would exacerbate problems with snow removal and emergency vehicle access).

    In some cases, there will be a negative impact on property values. Many residents have urged the city to retain some neighborhoods where homes are zoned as single family and where ADUs are not allowed. Unfortunately, four members of the City Council have chosen to eliminate these types of neighborhoods entirely from all of Salt Lake City.

    In addition, the city has failed to inform the vast majority of residents of its intended actions and the negative implications this radical change would have on their homes and the character and safety of their neighborhoods.

    If you believe that the city should retain the option of residents being able to live in a single-family home neighborhood without ADUs (as one of many options the city is advocating), it is important that you post your comments on “Open City Hall,” call or write to all seven members of the City Council and attend the public hearings.

    The City Council has set a second hearing to solicit comments on its proposal to allow ADUs in your neighborhood for 7 p.m., Oct. 3. Hearings take place at City Hall, room 315.

    Douglas Maclean

    Salt Lake City