Business and Technology News

    Huawei executive’s lawyers fight for bail ahead of extradition decision


    VANCOUVER, British Columbia — At the second day of a bail hearing at British Columbia’s Supreme Court, Meng Wanzhou’s lawyers pulled out all the stops to free their client. They brought in executives of two security companies to testify about how...

    VANCOUVER, British Columbia — At the second day of a bail hearing at British Columbia’s Supreme Court, Meng Wanzhou’s lawyers pulled out all the stops to free their client. They brought in executives of two security companies to testify about how they would monitor the Huawei executive if she were to be released. The lawyers said Meng, 46, would pay the fees for both security companies, submit to physical and electronic monitoring, and give two Vancouver homes and a cash payment to secure bail. The cash and homes would total roughly $15 million in value.

    Tesla’s Elon Musk on ‘60 Minutes’: ‘I do not respect’ the SEC


    Elon Musk stuck a finger in the SEC’s eye Sunday night on “60 Minutes.” “I want to be clear: I do not respect the SEC. I do not respect them,” the Tesla CEO told Lesley Stahl on the nationally broadcast CBS news program. Discussing a stock...

    Elon Musk stuck a finger in the SEC’s eye Sunday night on “60 Minutes.” “I want to be clear: I do not respect the SEC. I do not respect them,” the Tesla CEO told Lesley Stahl on the nationally broadcast CBS news program. Discussing a stock fraud settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission in October that stripped him of his chairman’s title, Musk told Stahl that bringing in a new chairman as a babysitter is “not realistic” because “I’m the largest shareholder in the company and I could call for a shareholder vote and get anything done that I want.” Telecommunications executive Robyn Denholm was named Tesla chairwoman Nov. 8. Musk also said no one is reviewing his tweets, as called for in the settlement.

    Amazon’s homegrown chips threaten Intel


    Amazon, the world’s largest online retailer and its largest cloud-computing company, is pushing into a new line of work: computer chips. Late last month, the Seattle company revealed that it had spent the past few years building a new chip for use...

    Amazon, the world’s largest online retailer and its largest cloud-computing company, is pushing into a new line of work: computer chips. Late last month, the Seattle company revealed that it had spent the past few years building a new chip for use inside the millions of servers in its data centers around the world. Amazon does not plan to sell this chip directly to customers, but the decision by one of the world’s biggest buyers of computer processors to go the do-it-yourself route is likely to have a major impact on Intel, the huge Santa Clara chipmaker.

    Chinese court says Apple infringed on Qualcomm patents


    A two-year legal battle between Apple and its chip supplier, Qualcomm, reached a new level of contention Monday when Qualcomm said a Chinese court had ordered Apple to stop selling older iPhone models in China. The court ruling is the latest turn in the...

    A two-year legal battle between Apple and its chip supplier, Qualcomm, reached a new level of contention Monday when Qualcomm said a Chinese court had ordered Apple to stop selling older iPhone models in China. The court ruling is the latest turn in the two companies’ fight over Apple’s use of Qualcomm technology in iPhones. But Apple and Qualcomm disagreed on the impact the decision will have on iPhone sales in China. Qualcomm said a Chinese court ruled Nov. 30 that Apple had infringed on two Qualcomm patents and issued a preliminary injunction that bars Apple from selling the iPhone 6S, the iPhone 6S Plus, the iPhone 7, the iPhone 7 Plus, the iPhone 8, the iPhone 8 Plus and the iPhone X in China.

    Wells Fargo tops government report on fees paid by students


    Wells Fargo charges students the most in fees on average to have a bank account, according to a government report. The report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, released late Friday, showed that students paid an average of $46.99 in fees to...

    Wells Fargo charges students the most in fees on average to have a bank account, according to a government report. The report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, released late Friday, showed that students paid an average of $46.99 in fees to Wells Fargo over 12 months. That’s nearly double the fees charged students by TCF National Bank and U.S. Bank, which ranked second and third. The report focused on what are known as college-sponsored accounts, for which a bank often pays money to a college or university to market their accounts to students when they arrive on campus.

    Ship traffic, December 11


    Ship traffic Due to arrive today SHIP FROM PORT Castor Leader Vancouver, Wash. RCH CMA CGM Elbe Los Angeles OAK CMA CGM G. Washington Los Angeles OAK Cosco Portugal Los Angeles OAK London Express Seattle OAK Mastonia Honolulu OAK NYK Demeter Los...

    Ship traffic Due to arrive today SHIP FROM PORT Castor Leader Vancouver, Wash. RCH CMA CGM Elbe Los Angeles OAK CMA CGM G. Washington Los Angeles OAK Cosco Portugal Los Angeles OAK London Express Seattle OAK Mastonia Honolulu OAK NYK Demeter Los Angeles OAK Due to depart today SHIP TO PORT Arietta Port Unknown SFO Libra Leader Toyohashi, Japan BNC Maersk Algol Vostochnyy, Russia OAK Mahimahi Honolulu OAK MSC Julie Vancouver, B.C. OAK NYK Demeter Tokyo OAK Pacific Spike Port Unknow SCK Warnow Moon Gunsan, South Korea SFO Source: S.F. Marine Exchange

    Big Tuna finds a scapegoat: Millennials


    Why are we suddenly talking about canned tuna and Millennials? The Wall Street Journal reported this month that overall consumption of the packaged fish has declined by more than 40 percent in the United States during the past three decades, according to...

    Why are we suddenly talking about canned tuna and Millennials? The Wall Street Journal reported this month that overall consumption of the packaged fish has declined by more than 40 percent in the United States during the past three decades, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Among the reasons that people are less inclined to reach for a can of Bumble Bee: It isn’t convenient enough for younger consumers. Many people “can’t be bothered to open and drain the cans, or fetch utensils and dishes to eat the tuna,” the Journal reported. But the rationale that cut hardest, it seems, was a quote from a vice president for marketing and innovation for StarKist, one of the big three tuna purveyors.

    MoviePass, rattled by rough year, tries to rebound


    LOS ANGELES — The last year has been a roller coaster with 20 loops for MoviePass and its customers. The fast-growing subscription service for movie tickets spent months insisting that it was not running out of money despite evidence to the contrary....

    LOS ANGELES — The last year has been a roller coaster with 20 loops for MoviePass and its customers. The fast-growing subscription service for movie tickets spent months insisting that it was not running out of money despite evidence to the contrary. That emergency loan to keep operating? All part of the plan. That auditor’s report about escalating losses? Ignore it. Abrupt changes in service — some movies are restricted, now they’re not — arrived without warning or explanation. Now MoviePass is asking for forgiveness and hoping to move forward by unveiling a three-tiered pricing structure that takes effect Jan. 1.

    Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey criticized for his 'tone-deaf' promotion of Myanmar


    Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is the subject of mass scorn after a series of tweets in which he encouraged his followers to visit Myanmar, a country which in recent years has been accused of carrying out a mass genocide and other crimes against humanity...

    Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is the subject of mass scorn after a series of tweets in which he encouraged his followers to visit Myanmar, a country which in recent years has been accused of carrying out a mass genocide and other crimes against humanity against minorities.

    At NPR, an army of temps resents a workplace full of anxiety and insecurity


    WASHINGTON - Julia Botero was happy to catch on, and determined to stay on, at NPR. After completing an internship at the public broadcasting organization in D.C. in 2013, she began a year-long stint as a temporary employee, moving between producing jobs...

    WASHINGTON - Julia Botero was happy to catch on, and determined to stay on, at NPR. After completing an internship at the public broadcasting organization in D.C. in 2013, she began a year-long stint as a temporary employee, moving between producing jobs at NPR's signature news programs, "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition." Botero quickly realized what she was up against. As a "temp," she floated among unfamiliar co-workers and faced an ever-changing set of responsibilities, some of which she'd never been trained for. Her work contracts were sometimes as brief as two weeks, at the end of which she'd have to persuade a manager to extend her.

    Useful home appliance gifts


    Instant Pot Ace Cnet rating: 4 stars out of 5 The good: The blender handled a variety of foods during testing, including almonds, spinach pesto and smoothies. The pitcher contains a built-in heater so you can cook and blend food simultaneously, which...

    Instant Pot Ace Cnet rating: 4 stars out of 5 The good: The blender handled a variety of foods during testing, including almonds, spinach pesto and smoothies. The pitcher contains a built-in heater so you can cook and blend food simultaneously, which works well for soup, baby food and dairy alternatives like rice milk. And the preset modes are useful to make commonly blended foods. The bad: The blender was only adequate at crushing ice, and there are no manual controls if you want to use the heater without a preset blending mode. The cost: $99 to $139 The bottom line: The Ace is a useful and affordable appliance.

    ICYMI: Walgreens delivers; Landmark deal; SoftBank adds female partner


    If you missed it ... In a week when Canadian investigators said “Huawei” and U.S. investors said “no way,” this also happened: •Walgreens said it will team up with FedEx to deliver prescriptions as soon as the next day for a $4.99 fee, and is...

    If you missed it ... In a week when Canadian investigators said “Huawei” and U.S. investors said “no way,” this also happened: •Walgreens said it will team up with FedEx to deliver prescriptions as soon as the next day for a $4.99 fee, and is providing same-day deliveries in several cities. That will help it compete with CVS and Amazon. •Scattering someone’s cremated ashes isn’t exactly rocket science — except when it is. CNN reported that about 100 people’s remains were launched into space in a SpaceX satellite by San Francisco’s Elysium Space. The craft will orbit for about four years before falling back to Earth. •Landmark Theatres, the independent movie chain backed by billionaire Mark Cuban, was sold to Cohen Media Group.

    Empty boxes top high-tech toys on doctor-recommended list


    Skip the costly electronic games and flashy digital gizmos. Pediatricians say the best toys for tots are old-fashioned hands-on playthings that young children can enjoy with parents — things like blocks, puzzles — even throwaway cardboard boxes —...

    Skip the costly electronic games and flashy digital gizmos. Pediatricians say the best toys for tots are old-fashioned hands-on playthings that young children can enjoy with parents — things like blocks, puzzles — even throwaway cardboard boxes — that spark imagination and creativity. “A cardboard box can be used to draw on, or made into a house,” said Dr. Alan Mendelsohn, co-author of a recent report on selecting toys for young children, up to around age 5. Many parents feel pressured by ads promoting tablet-based toys and games as educational and brain-stimulating but there’s not much science to back up those claims, Mendelsohn said.

    AI as talent scout: unorthodox hires, and maybe lower pay


    One day this fall, Ashutosh Garg, chief executive of a recruiting service called Eightfold.ai, turned up a resume that piqued his interest. It belonged to a prospective data scientist, someone who unearths patterns in data to help businesses make...

    One day this fall, Ashutosh Garg, chief executive of a recruiting service called Eightfold.ai, turned up a resume that piqued his interest. It belonged to a prospective data scientist, someone who unearths patterns in data to help businesses make decisions, like how to target ads. But curiously, the resume featured the term “data science” nowhere. Instead, the resume belonged to an analyst at Barclays who had done graduate work in physics at UCLA. Though his profile on LinkedIn indicated he had never worked as a data scientist, Eightfold’s software flagged him as a good fit. He was similar in certain key ways, like his math and computer chops, to four actual data scientists whom Garg had instructed the software to consider as a model.

    Oil producers join forces and cut production again


    VIENNA — Oil prices spiked sharply higher Friday as major oil producers, including the OPEC cartel, agreed to cut global oil production by 1.2 million barrels a day to reduce oversupply. Following two days of meetings, the Organization of the Petroleum...

    VIENNA — Oil prices spiked sharply higher Friday as major oil producers, including the OPEC cartel, agreed to cut global oil production by 1.2 million barrels a day to reduce oversupply. Following two days of meetings, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries that includes the likes of Saudi Arabia and Iraq said it would cut 800,000 barrels per day for six months from January, though some countries such as Iran, which is facing wide-ranging sanctions from the United States, have been given an exemption. The balance will come from Russia and other non-OPEC countries. The United States, one of the world’s biggest producers, is not part of the deal.