NYT > Science

    Cancer Center Switches Focus on Fund-Raising as Problems Mount

    Cancer Center Switches Focus on Fund-Raising as Problems Mount


    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has scrambled to address public criticism and staff morale...

    The change highlights the challenges facing Memorial Sloan Kettering, one of the nation’s most prestigious cancer centers, amid a widening crisis.
    Hunt of Yellowstone Grizzly Bears Canceled as a Result of Judge’s Ruling

    Hunt of Yellowstone Grizzly Bears Canceled as a Result of Judge’s Ruling


    A grizzly bear in Grand Teton National Park. A federal judge reinstated grizzlies to the endangered species list and halted the hunting of bears in Wyoming and...

    A federal court decision found that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service erred in stripping the grizzlies’ status as a threatened species.
    ‘Highly Aggressive’ Green Crabs From Canada Menace Maine’s Coast

    ‘Highly Aggressive’ Green Crabs From Canada Menace Maine’s Coast


    Markus Frederich, a professor at the University of New England in Maine, says invasive green crabs from Canada, which are known for their aggressive and destructive nature, could worsen conditions for other marine life in New England...

    The crabs, which are known as the “cockroach of the sea,” eat oysters, can prey on lobsters in groups and have been known to turn on each other, experts said.
    3-D Printed Implant Gives Patches the Dachshund a New Skull

    3-D Printed Implant Gives Patches the Dachshund a New Skull


    Patches, a 9-year-old dachshund, before an operation to remove a large tumor and cover the gap in her skull with a custom 3-D printed titanium...

    Canadian and American veterinarians removed about 70 percent of the dog’s skull to remove a tumor. The gap was so large that more common methods could not cover it.
    Charles Kao, Nobel Laureate Who Revolutionized Fiber Optics, Dies at 84

    Charles Kao, Nobel Laureate Who Revolutionized Fiber Optics, Dies at 84


    Charles Kuen Kao doing an early experiment on optical fiber at the Standard Telecommunications Laboratory in Harlow, England, in the 1960s. He shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in...

    In the 1960s, Dr. Kao outlined the potential capacity of fiber optic cables for storing information, laying the technical groundwork for modern communications.
    How to Stop Poaching and Protect Endangered Species? Forget the ‘Kingpins’

    How to Stop Poaching and Protect Endangered Species? Forget the ‘Kingpins’


    Chumlong Lemtongthai, a Thai citizen convicted in South Africa in a rhino-hunting scheme. The horns were sold on the black market, authorities said. He was released earlier this...

    Authorities keep arresting people said to be bosses of wildlife trafficking, but that isn’t making a dent in the problem.

    ScienceTake: In the Garden of Eels


    Garden eels anchor themselves in the sand, which helps them feed on drifting plankton in strong...

    Garden eels anchor themselves in the sand, which helps them feed on drifting plankton in strong currents.

    The Strange Life of Garden Eels


    Garden eels use their mucus to anchor themselves to the ocean floor and contort into strange shapes and positions to catch...

    Garden eels use their mucus to anchor themselves to the ocean floor and contort into strange shapes and positions to catch plankton.
    What Artists Would Do if They Could Fly to the Moon

    What Artists Would Do if They Could Fly to the Moon


    Elon Musk, left, chief executive of SpaceX, shaking hands with Yusaku Maezawa, a Japanese billionaire who is scheduled to be the first private passenger on a trip around the moon. Mr. Maezawa said he would invite artists to join...

    A Japanese billionaire, Yusaku Maezawa, wants artists to join him on a pioneering spaceflight. We asked some leading candidates about the idea.
    Giving Malaria a Deadline

    Giving Malaria a Deadline


    A false-color scanning electron micrograph of an Anopheles gambiae mosquito. By using a method called a gene drive, researchers believe they can eliminate a population of disease-carrying mosquitoes within a dozen...

    With a new genetic tool, scientists move a step closer to eradicating mosquitoes and the deadly diseases they carry.
    Sexual Harassment Allegations Wipe a Name Off the Map

    Sexual Harassment Allegations Wipe a Name Off the Map


    The Royal Society Range in Antarctica, where the Matataua Glacier is located. The glacier’s name was changed after the geologist for whom it had been named, David Marchant, was accused of sexual...

    The geologist David Marchant was so renowned he had an Antarctic glacier named after him. The honor was stripped away after he was accused of sexual harassment in the field.
    Japan Has Enough Nuclear Material to Build an Arsenal. Its Plan: Recycle.

    Japan Has Enough Nuclear Material to Build an Arsenal. Its Plan: Recycle.


    After decades of delays, a plant in Rokkasho, Japan, is almost ready to start turning nuclear waste into nuclear fuel, its builders say. But Japan doesn’t use much nuclear power any...

    Japan has spent decades building a facility to turn nuclear waste into nuclear fuel, but neighbors fear it has other plans for its plutonium.
    The Couple Who Helped Decode Dyslexia

    The Couple Who Helped Decode Dyslexia


    Sally and Bennett Shaywitz, co-directors of the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity, have been conducting a study of people with dyslexia since...

    In 1983, Sally and Bennett Shaywitz began studying the reading skills of more than 400 children. The subjects are in their 40s now, and the Shaywitzes are still tracking them.
    Ice Surveys and Neckties at Dinner: Here’s Life at an Arctic Outpost

    Ice Surveys and Neckties at Dinner: Here’s Life at an Arctic Outpost


    Station Nord, on the northern coast of Greenland, in March, when scientific work resumed after a winter...

    Danish soldiers, scientists and two very sturdy dogs are the only residents of Station Nord in Greenland. Like any remote outpost, there are quirky rules and rituals.
    Trilobites: NASA’s TESS Starts Collecting Planets

    Trilobites: NASA’s TESS Starts Collecting Planets


    A "first light science image" made by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, part of its first round of data collection. It has already detected at least 73 potential exoplanets new to...

    The satellite, launched in April, has already identified at least 73 stars that may harbor exoplanets, most of them new to astronomers.
    Sloan Kettering’s Cozy Deal With Start-Up Ignites a New Uproar

    Sloan Kettering’s Cozy Deal With Start-Up Ignites a New Uproar


    At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan, doctors and staff objected to a for-profit venture that could be lucrative for a few leading researchers and board...

    A for-profit venture with exclusive rights to use the center’s vast archive of tissue slides has generated concerns at the nonprofit cancer center.
    Biosafety Reforms Still Lagging at Military Labs

    Biosafety Reforms Still Lagging at Military Labs


    Commander Franca Jones, a medical programs director at the Department of Defense, demonstrating protocol for transporting anthrax in 2015. Some 575 shipments of the deadly bacteria were sent to labs around the...

    Three years after finding that laboratories had mishandled deadly pathogens, the Pentagon has no way to measure the effectiveness of its reforms, according to a new report.
    Global Health: ‘Latent’ Tuberculosis? It’s Not That Common, Experts Find

    Global Health: ‘Latent’ Tuberculosis? It’s Not That Common, Experts Find


    A tuberculosis patient at a hospital in Guwahati, India, in March. Active infections remain quite deadly, but silent infections may be far less frequent than once...

    Active infections kill 4,000 people a day worldwide, more than AIDS does. But the notion that a quarter of the global population harbors silent tuberculosis is “a fundamental misunderstanding.”
    Trilobites: Decoding Pandas’ Come-Hither Calls

    Trilobites: Decoding Pandas’ Come-Hither Calls


    Bao Bao the panda at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., in 2014. Scientists discerned what pandas can learn from each others' bleats at various...

    During mating season, the solitary mammals bleat important information to each other through their dense bamboo habitat.
    A Breakthrough for U.S. Troops: Combat-Ready Pizza

    A Breakthrough for U.S. Troops: Combat-Ready Pizza


    You’ve tried the rest, now try the longest-lasting: M.R.E. pizza, developed at an Army laboratory in Natick, Mass., is designed to remain fresh in storage for up to three...

    The latest entree to join the Army’s roster of M.R.E. field rations is a Sicilian-style slice that stays fresh for years and took decades to develop.
    Trilobites: Elephant Tusk DNA Helps Track Ivory Poachers

    Trilobites: Elephant Tusk DNA Helps Track Ivory Poachers


    African elephants in Botswana. Researchers are turning to examining the DNA of elephant tusks to determine where they're being...

    Researchers are examining the genetic data in seized elephant ivory to trace it back to the animals’ homelands and connect it to global trafficking crimes.
    Luigi Cavalli-Sforza, 96, Who Tracked Genes Through History, Dies

    Luigi Cavalli-Sforza, 96, Who Tracked Genes Through History, Dies


    Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza in 2006. He was a pioneer in using genetic information to help trace human evolution, history and patterns of...

    Before 23andMe and Ancestry.com, he did groundbreaking work exploring how genes reveal where people come from and whom they’re related to.
    Trilobites: Kidney Stones Are More Beautiful Than You Might Think

    Trilobites: Kidney Stones Are More Beautiful Than You Might Think


    An extreme close-up of a very thin slice of a human kidney stone reveals the intricate patterns of its mineral...

    New research found that the painful deposits are surprisingly dynamic, forming much like microscopic coral reefs, and could help with treating them.
    Matter: Why Your DNA Is Still Uncharted Territory

    Matter: Why Your DNA Is Still Uncharted Territory


    DNA being sequenced in a process called gel electrophoresis. An enormous chunk of the human genome remains unstudied despite significant technological...

    Scientists are focusing on a relatively small number of human genes and neglecting thousands of others. The reasons have more to do with professional survival than genetics.