Big Picture

    US border policy controversy

    US border policy controversy


    Customs and border patrol officials in the United States are enforcing President Trump’s strict immigration policies on the Mexico border, causing widespread protests. At least 2,000 children have been separated from their parents since April. A US...

    Customs and border patrol officials in the United States are enforcing President Trump’s strict immigration policies on the Mexico border, causing widespread protests. At least 2,000 children have been separated from their parents since April.

    A US Border Patrol spotlight shined on a terrified mother and son from Honduras as they were found near the US-Mexico border on June 12 in McAllen, Texas. The asylum seekers had rafted across the Rio Grande and had become lost in the woods. They were then detained by Border Patrol agents and then sent to a processing center for possible separation. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is executing the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy towards undocumented immigrants. US Attorney General Jeff Sessions also said that domestic and gang violence in immigrants’ country of origin would no longer qualify them for political asylum status. (John Moore/Getty Images)

    Opioids land more women behind bars

    Opioids land more women behind bars


    This lone county jail in a remote corner of Appalachia offers an agonizing glimpse into how the tidal wave of opioids and methamphetamines has ravaged America. Here and in countless other places, addiction is driving skyrocketing rates of incarcerated...

    This lone county jail in a remote corner of Appalachia offers an agonizing glimpse into how the tidal wave of opioids and methamphetamines has ravaged America. Here and in countless other places, addiction is driving skyrocketing rates of incarcerated women, tearing apart families while squeezing communities that lack money, treatment programs and permanent solutions to close the revolving door. More than a decade ago, there were rarely more than 10 women in the Campbell County Jail in northeast Tennessee. Now the population is routinely around 60. Most who end up here have followed a similar path: they’re arrested on a drug-related charge and confined to a cell 23 hours a day. Many of their bunkmates also are addicts. They receive no counseling. Then weeks, months or years later, they’re released into the same community where friends - and in some cases, family - are using drugs. Soon they are again, too. And the cycle begins anew: Another arrest, another booking photo, another pink uniform and off to a cell to simmer in regret and despair. -- By David Goldman/Associated Press

    Jessica Morgan, high on methamphetamines and the opioid pain medication Opana, sits in a holding cell after being booked for drug possession at the Campbell County Jail in Jacksboro, Tenn. April 23, 2018. (David Goldman/Associated Press)

    Globe staff photos of the month, May 2018

    Globe staff photos of the month, May 2018


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: a tulip farm in Rhode Island, local graduations, Memorial Day, Boston Calling Music Festival, and the NHL and NBA playoffs. Vonshika Adapa, 5, of Shrewsbury, got all...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: a tulip farm in Rhode Island, local graduations, Memorial Day, Boston Calling Music Festival, and the NHL and NBA playoffs.

    Vonshika Adapa, 5, of Shrewsbury, got all dressed up to walk through tjhe Wicked Tulips Flower Farm in Johnston, R.I. More than 600,000 tulip bulbs were planted there last October. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

    Eruption of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano

    Eruption of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano


    The activity of Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island has become destructive since early May, burning dozens of homes and forcing residents to flee. Many fissures have opened, spewing lava into neighborhoods and into the Pacific Ocean. The activity of...

    The activity of Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island has become destructive since early May, burning dozens of homes and forcing residents to flee. Many fissures have opened, spewing lava into neighborhoods and into the Pacific Ocean.

    The activity of Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island has become destructive since early May, burning dozens of homes and forcing residents to flee. Many fissures have opened, spewing lava into neighborhoods and into the Pacific Ocean. (Bruce Omori/Paradise Helicopters/EPA/Shutterstock)

    Raising Connor

    Raising Connor


    He is easy to love, affectionate, and friendly. He is moody and unpredictable. Vulnerable, sweet, devoted to family. Impulsive, strong, and overflowing with emotion. Dreaming of home, always. Never quite at home, anywhere. This is Connor, a puzzle his...

    He is easy to love, affectionate, and friendly. He is moody and unpredictable. Vulnerable, sweet, devoted to family. Impulsive, strong, and overflowing with emotion. Dreaming of home, always. Never quite at home, anywhere. This is Connor, a puzzle his family and caregivers have worked long and hard to solve, a boy who lives at the intersection of autism and mental illness. It isn’t so much a rare place — as many as half of autistic children suffer from mental health problems — but it can be a deeply baffling one. The overlap between these afflictions is hard to untangle; diagnosis and treatment can be very difficult. And a health care system meant to help can instead be frustrating, even harsh. Photography by Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff -- Read the Story --

    Connor Biscan stood atop a small rock and searched the sky for the balloons he had lost at a family gathering in Nelson, N.H. on Labor Day weekend. Connor had flown the balloons in an open field behind his great-grandfather’s house. When the kite string broke and the balloons snagged on a tree, Connor became anxious. His mother, Roberta Biscan, praised him for remaining calm. As a baby, balloon was his first word. (Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff)

    Globe staff photos of the month, April 2018

    Globe staff photos of the month, April 2018


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: a funeral for a fallen police officer, the Boston Marathon, a new home for a lost dog, opening day at Fenway Park, and the Bruins and Celtics in the...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: a funeral for a fallen police officer, the Boston Marathon, a new home for a lost dog, opening day at Fenway Park, and the Bruins and Celtics in the playoffs.

    Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker laughed with World War II veteran and San Diego native Sidney Walton, 99, and his son Paul during a meeting at the State House on April 30. (Keith Bedford/Globe Staff)

    Spring blossoms

    Spring blossoms


    To commemorate Earth Day on April 22, a look at transforming landscapes around the world bursting with color as warm weather approaches. Cherry blossoms bloom on a hillside near Mount Yoshino on April 3 in Yoshino, Japan. (Carl Court/Getty...

    To commemorate Earth Day on April 22, a look at transforming landscapes around the world bursting with color as warm weather approaches.

    Cherry blossoms bloom on a hillside near Mount Yoshino on April 3 in Yoshino, Japan. (Carl Court/Getty Images)

    2018 Boston Marathon

    2018 Boston Marathon


    Thousands of runners compete under miserable weather conditions during the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon. Runners cross a drenched finish line at the Boston Marathon. (John Tlumacki/Globe...

    Thousands of runners compete under miserable weather conditions during the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon.

    Runners cross a drenched finish line at the Boston Marathon. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

    Remembering Martin Luther King Jr.

    Remembering Martin Luther King Jr.


    A look at some of the pivotal moments in the life of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. as we mark the 50th anniversary of the tragic end of his life on April 4, 1968. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was welcomed with a kiss from his wife Coretta...

    A look at some of the pivotal moments in the life of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. as we mark the 50th anniversary of the tragic end of his life on April 4, 1968.

    The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was welcomed with a kiss from his wife Coretta after leaving court in Montgomery, Ala., March 22, 1956. King was found guilty of conspiracy to boycott city buses in a campaign to desegregate the bus system, but a judge suspended his $500 fine pending appeal. (Gene Herrick/Associated Press)

    Globe staff photos of the month, March 2018

    Globe staff photos of the month, March 2018


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: multiple nor’easters, St. Patrick’s Day, protesting gun violence, hockey and basketball state high school championships, Good Friday, and the start of Red Sox...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: multiple nor’easters, St. Patrick’s Day, protesting gun violence, hockey and basketball state high school championships, Good Friday, and the start of Red Sox season.

    Three-year-old Ellie Daiute of Braintree took big steps to make it up up the stairs at City Hall Plaza. Higher temperatures near the end of the month made the day feel like spring. (Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff)

    2018 Paralympic Winter Games

    2018 Paralympic Winter Games


    Scenes from the Paralympics in PyeongChang, South Korea taking place March 9-18. 670 athletes with disabilities from around the world compete in 80 events in six different sports. Australia’s Victoria Pendergast competes during the Alpine Skiing...

    Scenes from the Paralympics in PyeongChang, South Korea taking place March 9-18. 670 athletes with disabilities from around the world compete in 80 events in six different sports.

    Australia’s Victoria Pendergast competes during the Alpine Skiing Sitting Men’s Giant Slalom run 2 at the Jeongseon Alpine Centre in Jeongseon, South Korea on March 14. (Joel Marklund/OIS/IOC via AP)

    Back to back nor’easter storms slam Massachusetts

    Back to back nor’easter storms slam Massachusetts


    Two nor’easter storms in the past week have brought snow, power outages and flooding to towns across Massachusetts. A woman with a child in her arms was rescued from the rising waters in the Houghs Neck section of Quincy on Friday, March 2. (John...

    Two nor’easter storms in the past week have brought snow, power outages and flooding to towns across Massachusetts.

    A woman with a child in her arms was rescued from the rising waters in the Houghs Neck section of Quincy on Friday, March 2. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

    Globe staff photos of the month, February 2018

    Globe staff photos of the month, February 2018


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: record temperatures, bringing dental care to Jamaica, retiring Paul Pierce’s Celtic number, a Super Bowl loss, and the start of Red Sox spring training in...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: record temperatures, bringing dental care to Jamaica, retiring Paul Pierce’s Celtic number, a Super Bowl loss, and the start of Red Sox spring training in Florida.

    Community members in Brockton gathered for a vigil in memory of 8-year-old Edson Brito and 5-year-old Lason Brito on Feb. 8. The two boys were fatally stabbed and found in a Prospect Street home on Feb. 5. (Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff)

    Olympic celebrations

    Olympic celebrations


    Capturing the moments when olympic athletes celebrated a win or their performance at the PyeongChang games. Jessica Diggins, left, of the United States, crossed the finish line just past Stina Nilsson, of Sweden and won the gold medal with teammate...

    Capturing the moments when olympic athletes celebrated a win or their performance at the PyeongChang games.

    Jessica Diggins, left, of the United States, crossed the finish line just past Stina Nilsson, of Sweden and won the gold medal with teammate Kikkan Randal in the women’s team sprint freestyle cross-country skiing. (Dmitri Lovetsky/Associated Press)

    142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show

    142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show


    The annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show returned to New York City this week, with nearly 3,000 canines competing for the top prize of “Best in Show.” Best in Show winner Flynn, a Bichon Frise, poses for photos at the conclusion of the 142nd...

    The annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show returned to New York City this week, with nearly 3,000 canines competing for the top prize of “Best in Show.”

    Best in Show winner Flynn, a Bichon Frise, poses for photos at the conclusion of the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at The Piers on February 13, 2018 in New York City. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

    South Korea Olympic Games opening ceremony

    South Korea Olympic Games opening ceremony


    The Olympic torch was finally lit, its flames licking the cold South Korea sky, a fitting and beautiful end to one of the greatest nights of pageantry the sports world has to offer. Fireworks erupted as the cauldron was lit with the Olympic flame during...

    The Olympic torch was finally lit, its flames licking the cold South Korea sky, a fitting and beautiful end to one of the greatest nights of pageantry the sports world has to offer.

    Fireworks erupted as the cauldron was lit with the Olympic flame during the opening ceremony of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the PyeongChang Stadium. (David J. Philip/AFP/Getty Images)

    In rural Jamaica, dentists tend to the poor

    In rural Jamaica, dentists tend to the poor


    Over five challenging days, 18 students and faculty from the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine set up shop in crossroads towns in Jamaica bringing relief and education to thousands who otherwise would suffer unattended. They performed hundreds...

    Over five challenging days, 18 students and faculty from the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine set up shop in crossroads towns in Jamaica bringing relief and education to thousands who otherwise would suffer unattended. They performed hundreds of cases of dental triage. Photographs by Jessica Rinaldi read story

    A 10-year-old girl named Jada grabbed onto Michael Golub’s hand as he was passing through the courtyard of the primary school in Brown’s Town, Jamaica. She had not been seen by a dentist and had a tooth that was painful and needed to be extracted. The Jamaica mission was bolstered by Golub’s parents, Tufts faculty members who have made humanitarian work a cornerstone of their personal and professional lives. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)

    40th anniversary of the Blizzard of ‘78

    40th anniversary of the Blizzard of ‘78


    The Blizzard of ‘78 is a storm that will be remembered. The blizzard reached Massachusetts on Feb. 6, 1978, and the snow did not stop falling for 32 hours. When it was over, 73 lives were lost and hundreds of houses destroyed. Vehicles were snowbound...

    The Blizzard of ‘78 is a storm that will be remembered. The blizzard reached Massachusetts on Feb. 6, 1978, and the snow did not stop falling for 32 hours. When it was over, 73 lives were lost and hundreds of houses destroyed.

    Vehicles were snowbound on Route 128 South in the aftermath of the massive blizzard on Feb. 8, 1978. (David L. Ryan/Globe Staff)

    Super Bowl LII: Patriots vs. Eagles

    Super Bowl LII: Patriots vs. Eagles


    The New England Patriots lost to the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl LII. The Eagles win the Lombardi Trophy for the first time. On the final play of the game, Danny Amendola dove for the ball, but it had already bounced off the ground. (Jim...

    The New England Patriots lost to the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl LII. The Eagles win the Lombardi Trophy for the first time.

    On the final play of the game, Danny Amendola dove for the ball, but it had already bounced off the ground. (Jim Davis/Globe Staff)

    Globe staff photos of the month, January 2018

    Globe staff photos of the month, January 2018


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: winter storms, a blue supermoon eclipse, Muslim Lobby Day at the Massachusetts State House, a dairy farm in Shelburne, and the Patriots’ road to Super Bowl LII. Amani...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: winter storms, a blue supermoon eclipse, Muslim Lobby Day at the Massachusetts State House, a dairy farm in Shelburne, and the Patriots’ road to Super Bowl LII.

    Amani Faldi, age 8, prepared her hijab before participating in Muslim Lobby Day at the Massachusetts State House on Jan. 30. (Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff)

    Patriots win AFC Championship

    Patriots win AFC Championship


    Patriots beat the Jacksonville Jaguars and are headed to the Super Bowl once again. Chris Hogan and Danny Amendola celebrated Amendola’s touchdown in the fourth quarter as the Patriots took the lead. (Barry Chin/Globe...

    Patriots beat the Jacksonville Jaguars and are headed to the Super Bowl once again.

    Chris Hogan and Danny Amendola celebrated Amendola’s touchdown in the fourth quarter as the Patriots took the lead. (Barry Chin/Globe Staff)

    Powerful winter storm hits Mass.

    Powerful winter storm hits Mass.


    Kathleen O’Day shovels out her car for a second time in South Boston on Jan. 5. (David L. Ryan/Globe...



    Kathleen O’Day shovels out her car for a second time in South Boston on Jan. 5. (David L. Ryan/Globe Staff)

    Animals up-close

    Animals up-close


    Photographers allow us to get up-close and personal with animals all around the world. A rhino baby, not named yet, walks outside for the first time with her mother Naima at Blijdorp Zoo in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Jan. 4. The rhinoceros baby was born...

    Photographers allow us to get up-close and personal with animals all around the world.

    A rhino baby, not named yet, walks outside for the first time with her mother Naima at Blijdorp Zoo in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Jan. 4. The rhinoceros baby was born on Dec. 28. (Remko de Waalde Waal/EPA/Shutterstock)

    The best Boston Globe photos of 2017

    The best Boston Globe photos of 2017


    Globe photographers share the stories behind what went into making the year’s best photos, as selected by the editors of the Globe Magazine and photo department. August 19 / Boston -- I was assigned to cover what was called the “Free Speech” rally...

    Globe photographers share the stories behind what went into making the year’s best photos, as selected by the editors of the Globe Magazine and photo department.

    August 19 / Boston -- I was assigned to cover what was called the “Free Speech” rally on Boston Common. They were expecting to have Nazi sympathizers speaking. It was a week after Charlottesville; we were on edge. All eyes were on Boston. It was scary. The rally spilled into Downtown Crossing. Some protesters were trying to antagonize police. One pushed an officer against his motorcycle. There was a chase; the police officer was running full speed, tackled the guy, and threw him on the ground. This isn’t police brutality, just a show of force. You have to give them credit for showing restraint that day. They took a lot of abuse. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff )

    Globe staff photos of the month, December 2017

    Globe staff photos of the month, December 2017


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: of frigid cold, Madison Park High School students walking out, First Night celebrations, high school Super Bowl championships, and the Patriots’ push for the...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: of frigid cold, Madison Park High School students walking out, First Night celebrations, high school Super Bowl championships, and the Patriots’ push for the playoffs.

    A pedestrian crossing Harrison Ave walked through a steam vent on a chilly day in Boston. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)

    The year 2017 in pictures: Part I

    The year 2017 in pictures: Part I


    Photographs from January to June on a range of topics from around the world. -- See Part II President-elect Donald Trump waits to step out onto the portico for his Presidential Inauguration at the US Capitol in Washington. (Patrick Semansky/Associated...

    Photographs from January to June on a range of topics from around the world. -- See Part II

    President-elect Donald Trump waits to step out onto the portico for his Presidential Inauguration at the US Capitol in Washington. (Patrick Semansky/Associated Press)

    The year 2017 in pictures: Part II

    The year 2017 in pictures: Part II


    Photos from July to December on a range of topics from around the world. See -- Part I A demonstrator is taken into custody by US Capitol Police during a protest against the Republican health care bill outside the offices of Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz.,...

    Photos from July to December on a range of topics from around the world. See -- Part I

    A demonstrator is taken into custody by US Capitol Police during a protest against the Republican health care bill outside the offices of Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, on Capitol Hill in Washington on July 10. (J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press)

    Yearning to breathe free

    Yearning to breathe free


    A year ago, eight Syrian families fled the violence of their homeland and immigrated to Greater Boston. They were among the last such refugees allowed into the United States as a result of the Trump administration’s multiple efforts to ban immigrants...

    A year ago, eight Syrian families fled the violence of their homeland and immigrated to Greater Boston. They were among the last such refugees allowed into the United States as a result of the Trump administration’s multiple efforts to ban immigrants from certain majority Muslim countries, including Syria. To smooth the transition, Jewish Family Service of Metrowest launched the Syrian Refugee Humanitarian Project, working with Jewish synagogues, Islamic centers, doctors, dentists, businesses, and an army of volunteers to provide safety, hope and a new life to these immigrants. The Globe spent the past year following the refugees’ sometimes painful, sometimes joyous journey. From their first steps on American soil, Globe photographer Suzanne Kreiter and reporter Jenna Russell documented their struggles to acclimate to the climate, both meteorological and political; their efforts to adapt to a new culture while preserving their heritage; their determination to achieve self-sufficiency; and the bonds of friendship they forged with people who practice a religion they were taught as children to hate. Photography by Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff -- read more from the series --

    At Logan Airport, Nermin Helaly (holding paper), a case manager with the JFS Syrian Humanitarian Project, greeted Um Alnoor with a giant hug in November 2016. The Alnoors were the first of eight Syrian refugee families to arrive before the Trump administration enacted a ban on immigrants from certain Muslim-majority countries, including Syria. -- Editor’s note: Some names in this photo gallery have been changed to protect the subjects’ privacy. (Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff)

    Colors of the season

    Colors of the season


    Cities and towns around the world celebrate holidays with festive decorations and traditions. Holiday lights reflect in the waters off Nubble Light, silhouetting photographer Michael Blanchette of Bedford, N.H., Dec. 11, in York, Maine. The beacon on top...

    Cities and towns around the world celebrate holidays with festive decorations and traditions.

    Holiday lights reflect in the waters off Nubble Light, silhouetting photographer Michael Blanchette of Bedford, N.H., Dec. 11, in York, Maine. The beacon on top of the lighthouse has been helping mariners navigate the coastal waters of southern Maine since 1879. The seasonal decorations will stay lit through Jan. 1. (Robert F. Bukaty/ Associated Press)

    California fires roar again

    California fires roar again


    California is dealing with another round of disastrous wildfires, just two months after the Santa Rosa fires. A motorists on Highway 101 watches flames from the Thomas fire leap above the roadway north of Ventura, Calif., on Dec. 6. (Noah...

    California is dealing with another round of disastrous wildfires, just two months after the Santa Rosa fires.

    A motorists on Highway 101 watches flames from the Thomas fire leap above the roadway north of Ventura, Calif., on Dec. 6. (Noah Berger/Associated Press)

    Globe staff photos of the month, November 2017

    Globe staff photos of the month, November 2017


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: of Veterans Day, elections, thanksgiving day HS football, and Celtics winning streak. A Giant White turkey took interest in a photographer at Watts Family Farm in...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: of Veterans Day, elections, thanksgiving day HS football, and Celtics winning streak.

    A Giant White turkey took interest in a photographer at Watts Family Farm in Forestdale. The Watts have been selling turkeys for Thanksgiving for more than 20 years. (Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff)

    Autumn scenes

    Autumn scenes


    A look at fall around the world as winter and the holidays approach, and the colors and of this season disappear. A fallen leaf reflects in a puddle in a park in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on Nov. 13. (FRANK RUMPENHORST/AFP/Getty...

    A look at fall around the world as winter and the holidays approach, and the colors and of this season disappear.

    A fallen leaf reflects in a puddle in a park in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on Nov. 13. (FRANK RUMPENHORST/AFP/Getty Images)

    Trump tours Asia

    Trump tours Asia


    US President Donald Trump travels to five countries on an 12-day trip in Asia, his longest overseas journey as president. A child holds Chinese and USA national flags before the welcome ceremony for U.S. President Donald J. Trump and Chinese President Xi...

    US President Donald Trump travels to five countries on an 12-day trip in Asia, his longest overseas journey as president.

    A child holds Chinese and USA national flags before the welcome ceremony for U.S. President Donald J. Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Nov. 9. (ROMAN PILIPEY/EPA/Shutterstock)

    Globe staff photos of the month, October 2017

    Globe staff photos of the month, October 2017


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: leaf peepers in Vermont, Head of the Charles, hurricane aftermath in Puerto Rico, foggy football, baseball playoffs, and the start of the Celtics regular season. A woman...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: leaf peepers in Vermont, Head of the Charles, hurricane aftermath in Puerto Rico, foggy football, baseball playoffs, and the start of the Celtics regular season.

    A woman walked past a brightly colored mural along Broadway as a light rain fell in Somerville. The month ended with a series of rainstorms sweeping the Boston area. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)

    Stranger Things (of  the Animal Kingdom)

    Stranger Things (of the Animal Kingdom)


    Eerie captures of the many interesting earth dwellers that photographers have encountered around the world. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelA Secretary bird rolls its eyes back as it squawks at the World of Birds Wildlife Sanctuary in Cape Town, South...

    Eerie captures of the many interesting earth dwellers that photographers have encountered around the world. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    A Secretary bird rolls its eyes back as it squawks at the World of Birds Wildlife Sanctuary in Cape Town, South Africa. (NIC BOTHMA/EPA/Shutterstock)

    Rohingya refugees flee violence in Myanmar

    Rohingya refugees flee violence in Myanmar


    More than half a million Rohingya refugees have flooded into Bangladesh to flee an offensive by Myanmar’s military that the United Nations has called ‘a textbook example of ethnic cleansing’. The refugee population is expected to swell further,...

    More than half a million Rohingya refugees have flooded into Bangladesh to flee an offensive by Myanmar’s military that the United Nations has called ‘a textbook example of ethnic cleansing’. The refugee population is expected to swell further, with thousands more Rohingya Muslims said to be making the perilous journey on foot toward the border, or paying smugglers to take them across by water in wooden boats. Hundreds are known to have died trying to escape, and survivors arrive with horrifying accounts of villages burned, women raped, and scores killed in the ‘clearance operations’ by Myanmar’s army and Buddhist mobs that were sparked by militant attacks on security posts in Rakhine state on August 25, 2017. What the Rohingya refugees flee to is a different kind of suffering in sprawling makeshift camps rife with fears of malnutrition, cholera, and other diseases. Aid organizations are struggling to keep pace with the scale of need and the staggering number of them - an estimated 60 percent - who are children arriving alone. Bangladesh, whose acceptance of the refugees has been praised by humanitarian officials for saving lives, has urged the creation of an internationally-recognized ‘safe zone’ where refugees can return, though Rohingya Muslims have long been persecuted in predominantly Buddhist Myanmar. World leaders are still debating how to confront the country and its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate who championed democracy, but now appears unable or unwilling to stop the army’s brutal crackdown. -- By Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

    A Rohingya refugee boy cries as he fights his way in the crowd to get food aid from a local NGO at the Balukali refugee camp on Sept. 18, in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

    Maria’s aftermath in Puerto Rico

    Maria’s aftermath in Puerto Rico


    When I step off the plane in San Juan, eight days after the devastation, I see them. A wall of people trying desperately to get out of the country. They fill the airport — families, people in wheelchairs, people of all ages. Some have been camped...

    When I step off the plane in San Juan, eight days after the devastation, I see them. A wall of people trying desperately to get out of the country. They fill the airport — families, people in wheelchairs, people of all ages. Some have been camped out for days. It’s the first of a million long lines I will encounter in six days on the island. People are waiting for things we take for granted: gas, laundry, cash, water, food, medicine, shelter. At first the lines are jaw-dropping. After a while, they just become infuriating. Outside of San Juan, signs of Hurricane Maria are everywhere. A countryside entirely stripped of its foliage, debris strewn about, homes without roofs. Heading west, I spot a couple on the side of the highway carrying a basket of laundry down a steep hill. By the time I turn around to photograph them, they’re down in a stream washing their clothes. A few exits later, in Toa Baja, people are shoveling mud out of their homes. Manuel Albert Ruiz tells me a harrowing story about how he rescued his neighbor as the street began to flood in the middle of the storm. He calls her down to the street and demonstrates how he did it, scooping her up with one arm and tucking her to his side. They’re both laughing even though he’s in the midst of throwing away everything he owns. That night, Manuel’s wife will e-mail me and ask if I can send some of the pictures I shot of his baby photos. The framed photos had been covered in mud, and Manuel was throwing them away. His wife wanted my photos of them for her children. “Thank you! You have no idea what those few pictures mean to us,” she wrote. Reading her note, I wish I could do more. You want to fix things. You press the shutter. You hope, you shoot, you hope some more.   -- By Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

    In Corozal, Orlando Gonzalez holds his daughter, Nahielys, at the funeral of their neighbor, who died as a result of the storm. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)

    Raging wildfires in California

    Raging wildfires in California


    Destructive fires in Northern California have killed at least 21 people and destroyed at least 1,500 buildings, leaving devastating scenes in their path. More than 150,000 acres have been burned, forcing the evacuation of up to 20,000 people. Hundres of...

    Destructive fires in Northern California have killed at least 21 people and destroyed at least 1,500 buildings, leaving devastating scenes in their path. More than 150,000 acres have been burned, forcing the evacuation of up to 20,000 people. Hundres of people are recorded missing and the fire gained momentum as winds picked up on Wednesday.

    The main building at Paras Vinyards burns in the Mount Veeder area of Napa in California on Oct. 10. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)

    Globe staff photos of the month, September 2017

    Globe staff photos of the month, September 2017


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, remembering the Sept. 11 attacks, signs of fall, the Boston mayoral race, and the football season in full swing. Volunteers in Weston placed...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, remembering the Sept. 11 attacks, signs of fall, the Boston mayoral race, and the football season in full swing.

    Volunteers in Weston placed 3,000 flags on the Weston Town Green to commemorate those who died in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. (Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff)

    Beyond the lines

    Beyond the lines


    Manny Machado, the Baltimore Orioles third baseman, took some heat earlier this season when he said that baseball is “a little boring to watch.” It’s true that unlike other major sports, most players on the field of play are usually standing...

    Manny Machado, the Baltimore Orioles third baseman, took some heat earlier this season when he said that baseball is “a little boring to watch.” It’s true that unlike other major sports, most players on the field of play are usually standing around. But he’s not looking at the big picture, especially the carnival-like atmosphere of Fenway Park. The Globe’s Stan Grossfeld trained his camera away from game action to record scenes that are anything but boring.

    The view behind Lynne Smith of Wellesley, the “Fenway Hat Lady”. (Stan Grossfeld/ Globe Staff)

    NRA night at NASCAR in Bristol, Tenn.

    NRA night at NASCAR in Bristol, Tenn.


    Tens of thousands of NASCAR fans gather near this tiny southern town for a premier event, and one that’s sponsored by the NRA. But here, deep in Trump country, there was universal condemnation for white supremacists and Neo-nazis. -- By Jessica...

    Tens of thousands of NASCAR fans gather near this tiny southern town for a premier event, and one that’s sponsored by the NRA. But here, deep in Trump country, there was universal condemnation for white supremacists and Neo-nazis. -- By Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff photographer

    Warren Denney, a professional Abraham Lincoln impersonator, wears his hat as he stands to watch the cars take off for the Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race Qualifying Race. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)

    Deadly earthquake hits Mexico City

    Deadly earthquake hits Mexico City


    A powerful 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck Mexico City on the 32nd anniversary of the city’s biggest quake that killed thousands. Rescue and search missions are under way as workers and residents dig through the rubble looking for survivors. The quake...

    A powerful 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck Mexico City on the 32nd anniversary of the city’s biggest quake that killed thousands. Rescue and search missions are under way as workers and residents dig through the rubble looking for survivors. The quake has claimed at least 200 lives, including 21 children trapped in their school.

    A rescue worker listens for signs of a person trapped under the rubble of a building in the Ciudad Jardin neighborhood of Mexico City on Sept 21. (Eduardo Verdugo/Associated Press)

    Impact of Hurricane Irma

    Impact of Hurricane Irma


    Hurricane Irma devastated the Caribbean Islands and left a path of destruction all over the state of Florida. At least 72 people are dead, as rescue operations continue and the extent damage is still being determined. Florida is dealing with record...

    Hurricane Irma devastated the Caribbean Islands and left a path of destruction all over the state of Florida. At least 72 people are dead, as rescue operations continue and the extent damage is still being determined. Florida is dealing with record flooding, and over six million people lost power.

    Bill Quinn surveys the damage caused to his trailer home from Hurricane Irma at the Seabreeze Trailer Park in Islamorada, in the Florida Keys, Sept. 12. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

    Globe staff photos of the month, August 2017

    Globe staff photos of the month, August 2017


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including a solar eclipse, Boston Comic Con, the Elite Dodgeball National Championships, a record setting attempt for visiting every T station on every subway line, and...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including a solar eclipse, Boston Comic Con, the Elite Dodgeball National Championships, a record setting attempt for visiting every T station on every subway line, and the counter protest to the “Free Speech Rally” in Boston.

    Boston Police officer Muryelle Staco shows her moves during a “Dance with a Cop” contest with youngsters at the YMCA’s Camp Ponkapoag in Milton. (David L. Ryan/Globe Staff)

    The 20th anniversary of the death of Princess Diana

    The 20th anniversary of the death of Princess Diana


    She was adored in Britain, and beyond, and in her death was dubbed “the people’s princess.” Diana, Princess of Wales, brought a warmth and humanity to the British monarchy that it hadn’t known before, and the masses loved her for it. Her...

    She was adored in Britain, and beyond, and in her death was dubbed “the people’s princess.” Diana, Princess of Wales, brought a warmth and humanity to the British monarchy that it hadn’t known before, and the masses loved her for it. Her struggles, her heartbreak, her tireless charitable work endeared her to people everywhere, and 20 years ago — on Aug. 31, 1997 — Diana’s death at 36 in a high-speed car crash in Paris left the world in mourning. Tens of thousands paid their respects in person, tearfully laying flowers at the gates of Kensington Palace in her memory. Millions more watched her funeral, which was televised around the globe.

    From left, Prince Charles, Prince Harry, Earl Charles Spencer, Prince William, and Prince Philip stood as the coffin bearing the body of Princess Diana was taken into Westminster Abbey in London on Sept. 6, 1997. (John Gaps III/Pool)

    Hurricane Harvey devastates southeast Texas

    Hurricane Harvey devastates southeast Texas


    Hurricane Harvey made landfall as a Category 4 storm along the southeast coastline of Texas over the weekend, the most powerful storm to hit the United States since 2004. As the storm lingers in the region, rainfall has caused major flooding in the...

    Hurricane Harvey made landfall as a Category 4 storm along the southeast coastline of Texas over the weekend, the most powerful storm to hit the United States since 2004. As the storm lingers in the region, rainfall has caused major flooding in the Houston area and south Texas, leading to thousands of people needing rescue and evacuation.

    People wait in line to buy groceries at a Food Town during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 30 in Houston. Monster storm Harvey made landfall again Wednesday in Louisiana, evoking painful memories of Hurricane Katrina's deadly strike 12 years ago, as time was running out in Texas to find survivors in the raging floodwaters. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

    There goes the sun, total solar eclipse 2017

    There goes the sun, total solar eclipse 2017


    For the first time since 1918, a total eclipse of the sun was viewable from coast-to-coast in a 70-mile wide path of the United States for around two minutes at totality. -- By Lloyd YoungA woman reacts to seeing the solar eclipse along the waterfront...

    For the first time since 1918, a total eclipse of the sun was viewable from coast-to-coast in a 70-mile wide path of the United States for around two minutes at totality. -- By Lloyd Young

    A woman reacts to seeing the solar eclipse along the waterfront near the Children's Museum in Boston. (Keith Bedford/Globe Staff)

    Scenes from the ‘Boston Free Speech’ rally and counterprotest

    Scenes from the ‘Boston Free Speech’ rally and counterprotest


    Thousands of counterprotesters march down Tremont Street towards the “Boston Free Speech” rally on the Boston Common. (Matthew J. Lee/Globe...



    Thousands of counterprotesters march down Tremont Street towards the “Boston Free Speech” rally on the Boston Common. (Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff)

    ‘Ragnarok’ event reenacts mythic battle

    ‘Ragnarok’ event reenacts mythic battle


    For 32 years now, one week each summer, the world has come to an end. Behold, Ragnarok: a weeklong battle event, held at a campground in Pennsylvania, whose name references an apocalyptic Norse myth. It’s part medieval history, part celebration of...

    For 32 years now, one week each summer, the world has come to an end. Behold, Ragnarok: a weeklong battle event, held at a campground in Pennsylvania, whose name references an apocalyptic Norse myth. It’s part medieval history, part celebration of author J.R.R. Tolkien’s books and a dizzying array of people brandishing foam weapons and foam shields. With “storyline battles” straight out of “Lord of the Rings,” fighters take to the field for full contact combat. The sport is called Dagorhir (it means “Battle Lords” in Tolkien’s Elvish language) and its players fight each other with foam swords, arrows, axes, rocks, and shields. Only traditional garb is allowed here. Think tunics, flowing skirts, leather shoes. Some embrace the medieval, while others go full Orc. There’s a deeper sense of shared community that flows through each camp set up here where fighters camp out together sometimes in period tents and cook together. Some of the more established camps host nightly gatherings where IDs and period drinking vessels are both required. This year’s event drew more than 1,800 people according to organizers, a far cry from the 75 people who were there the first time the world ended back in 1985. -- By Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

    Armed with foam shields and weapons, gladiators from the camp Rome charged into battle at Ragnarok XXXII. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)

    US border patrol agents in training

    US border patrol agents in training


    President Trump has pledged to add 5,000 agents to the existing Border Patrol force of more than 21,000 as part of his border security policy. All new agents complete a months-long training course at the US Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, N.M. -- By...

    President Trump has pledged to add 5,000 agents to the existing Border Patrol force of more than 21,000 as part of his border security policy. All new agents complete a months-long training course at the US Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, N.M. -- By John Moore/Getty Images

    US Border Patrol trainees run upon their initial arrival to the US Border Patrol Academy on Aug. 2 in Artesia, N.M. All new agents must complete a months-long training course at the New Mexico faciltiy before assuming their posts at Border Patrol stations, mostly along the US-Mexico border. (John Moore/Getty Images)