Washington Free Beacon

    Claire McCaskill Praises Kamala Harris as ‘Leader’ on Immigration

    Claire McCaskill Praises Kamala Harris as ‘Leader’ on Immigration


    Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill (D.) praised her California colleague Sen. Kamala Harris on Thursday night as a "leader" in the party's effort to form "an immigration policy that is true to the heritage of this country." McCaskill introduced Harris at a...

    Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill (D.) praised her California colleague Sen. Kamala Harris on Thursday night as a "leader" in the party's effort to form "an immigration policy that is true to the heritage of this country."

    McCaskill introduced Harris at a NAACP dinner in St. Louis they both attended, and delved into the topic of immigration policy that has driven the week's news cycle. McCaskill has said she wants to work with Republicans on their immigration compromise bills, and stressed her desire to "secure the border." Harris, on the other hand, has been one of the most outspoken opponents of Republican immigration legislation and called for Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to resign.

    On Thursday night, McCaskill aligned herself with Harris.

    "[Harris] has been a leader in this effort to make sure we have an immigration policy that is true to the heritage of this country, and not to the misguided ideas of this president," McCaskill said.

    Harris has taken hardline immigration stances prior to the current uproar over family separation at the border.

    In March, Harris defended Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf's decision to warn residents about impending ICE raids, a move Trump called a "disgrace."

    "I think Mayor Schaaf is doing exactly what she believes is in the best interest of her community and I support that 100 percent," Harris said.

    Harris has also declared that California, which last year declared itself a "sanctuary state, "represents the future" on immigration policy.

    McCaskill, who has told voters she thinks she could work with President Trump and stressed that her "job is not to fight" his policies, also called Trump a "very stubborn man who never says he's wrong" during her introduction.

    Republican Josh Hawley's team responded to McCaskill's event with Harris by branding her "California Claire" and arguing that their immigration stances align.

    "California Claire and Kamala Harris are completely aligned on some of the most left-wing issues in the Senate," Hawley campaign spokesman Kelli Ford said. "They both support sanctuary cities, they both oppose a border wall, they don't want a citizenship question on the Census, and they fully endorse Senator Feinstein's open borders bill. It's pretty clear partisan liberal Claire McCaskill agrees more with California voters than Missouri's."

    McCaskill's introduction and Harris' speech at the NAACP event can be viewed here.

    The post Claire McCaskill Praises Kamala Harris as ‘Leader’ on Immigration appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

    NBA Legend Stirs Controversy for Apparently Attending Trump Rally in Minnesota

    NBA Legend Stirs Controversy for Apparently Attending Trump Rally in Minnesota


    A Basketball Hall of Fame inductee sparked controversy this week after he appeared to attend a rally for President Donald Trump in Duluth, Minnesota, on Wednesday night. Kevin McHale, who played for the NBA's Boston Celtics from 1980 to 1993, drew...

    A Basketball Hall of Fame inductee sparked controversy this week after he appeared to attend a rally for President Donald Trump in Duluth, Minnesota, on Wednesday night.

    Kevin McHale, who played for the NBA's Boston Celtics from 1980 to 1993, drew rebuke from liberal activists after social media users noticed an individual matching the former player's 6-foot 10-inch frame in photos taken at the rally.

    McHale, a Minnesota native, retired from the NBA as a player in 1993 but has remained active in the league as a manager, commentator, and coach—leading the Minnesota Timberwolves from 2008-2009 and the Houston Rockets from 2011-2015. Since 2016, he has been an analyst for NBA TV and Turner Sports' "NBA on TNT."

    Thousands came to cheer President Trump in Duluth. pic.twitter.com/SEzYnpnr5p

    — Glen Stubbe (@gspphoto) June 21, 2018

    Is this Kevin McHale at the Trump rally? ⁦@RandBallsStupic.twitter.com/jPZQGhiEE0

    — parikop (@peekay622) June 21, 2018

    It remains unclear whether McHale is the man in the photos. The basketball great has refused to comment on the story.

    The unconfirmed photos triggered rebuke from media figures and liberal activists, with many demanding the NBA cut all ties with McHale.

    Henry Lake, a talk radio personality, said that if McHale admits he attended the rally, his employment should be terminated given "everything that is happening now and what Trump's done."

    "I'd love to get definitive confirmation," Lake wrote. "But if Kevin McHale actually showed up to Trump's rally in Duluth today with everything that is happening now and what Trump's done and stands for, yeah he's cancelled."

    I’d love to get definitive confirmation. But if Kevin McHale actually showed up to Trump’s rally in Duluth today with everything that is happening now and what Trump’s done and stands for, yeah he’s cancelled. pic.twitter.com/A99QSV56s4

    — Henry Lake (@lakeshow73) June 21, 2018

    GQ magazine writer Nathaniel Friedman echoed those sentiments, lambasting McHale for showing poor judgment by deciding to attend "a public Trump event." The writer asserted that McHale's choice "as much as his politics" exhibit "why he should never work" for the NBA again.

    "Kevin McHale is extremely stupid for attending a public Trump event," Friedman tweeted. "That, as much as his politics, is why he should never work in the NBA again"

    Kevin McHale is extremely stupid for attending a public Trump event. That, as much as his politics, is why he should never work in the NBA again

    — Nathaniel Friedman (@freedarko) June 21, 2018

    Others also went on Twitter to express their anger at McHale.

    Hall of Fame Celtic Kevin McHale and his wife attended a TRUMP rally?

    You're an analyst in a sport that is 75% black.

    You literally make money off the hard work of black athletes.

    Is this real? If so, he's gonna have a rough week. pic.twitter.com/pY6zCfI7gj

    — Mikel Jollett (@Mikel_Jollett) June 21, 2018

    If you're looking for a different Kevin McHale to support, one who most definitely would never attend a Trump rally or align himself with racists, etc., I'm still here.

    — Kevin McHale (@druidDUDE) June 21, 2018

    We getting Kevin McHale outta here?

    — Adrian Kofnarowski (@KofieYeboah) June 21, 2018

    Just catching up on this Kevin McHale thing.

    Look, nothing surprises me anymore.

    He’s from Minnesota and is a Boston legend.

    Sooooo, yeah

    — Carron J. Phillips (@carronJphillips) June 21, 2018

    I'm not mad, Kevin McHale.

    I'm just … disappointed.

    — Chris Walder (@WalderSports) June 21, 2018

    Slap a scarlet letter on Kevin McHale and anybody else still supporting Trump after three years of this BS.

    — Adam Best (@adamcbest) June 21, 2018

    Kevin McHale just became the other side of Collin Kaepernick. Hard to see him ever coaching again in the NBA.

    — Kelly Scaletta (@KellyScaletta) June 21, 2018

    turns out James Harden was extremely correct when he called Kevin McHale a clown https://t.co/Jer1FAJu6t

    — Jen Statsky (@jenstatsky) June 21, 2018

    Neither TNT nor the NBA have commented on McHale's employment status going forward.

    The post NBA Legend Stirs Controversy for Apparently Attending Trump Rally in Minnesota appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

    Merkley: Previous Immigration Deal Between Trump and Schumer Didn’t Include Border Wall

    Merkley: Previous Immigration Deal Between Trump and Schumer Didn’t Include Border Wall


    Sen. Jeff Merkley (D., Ore.) claimed Thursday that the proposed deal between President Donald Trump and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D., N.Y.) back in January did not include a wall along the southern border. MSNBC anchor Chuck Todd asked...

    Sen. Jeff Merkley (D., Ore.) claimed Thursday that the proposed deal between President Donald Trump and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D., N.Y.) back in January did not include a wall along the southern border.

    MSNBC anchor Chuck Todd asked Merkley whether he and his Democratic colleagues would vote to fund a border wall if Dreamers, illegal immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, receive a pathway to citizenship.

    "I mean, just to reiterate, you will vote for funding for the wall, full funding for the wall? I mean, you were willing—you and some Democrats were willing to do that if he really was willing to support citizenship for DACA." Todd said, referring to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which provided legal protections to Dreamers.

    "What was in that bill was border security for a year-by-year basis. And border security done smart. Not a wasted concrete wall in quite the vision that Trump has," Merkley responded.

    Merkley's claim that the border wall specifically was never part of the January deal contradicts previous reports.

    Back in January, the Washington Post reported that Schumer offered Trump full funding for the border wall but later withdrew the deal. There were several other attempts at reaching an agreement, but with Schumer and Democrats saying the wall would not be included.

    The Oregon Democrat's claim also contradicts statements from his Democratic colleagues.

    In a Friday interview, Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D., Wis.) said Democrats offered Trump funding for the wall. Florida Sen. Bill Nelson (D.) also said the deal included the border wall.

    "We already agreed to that back six months ago to solve the DACA problem," Nelson said in a Thursday interview.

    Merkley added that if such a deal resurfaced, he would support it again.

    "Absolutely," Merkley said. "We needed the president to actually have a spine in this case. And he failed us."

    The post Merkley: Previous Immigration Deal Between Trump and Schumer Didn’t Include Border Wall appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

    Mulvaney Impresses Trump With Impassioned Speech on the Country’s ‘Byzantine’ Regulatory System

    Mulvaney Impresses Trump With Impassioned Speech on the Country’s ‘Byzantine’ Regulatory System


    White House budget director Mick Mulvaney appeared to impress President Donald Trump with an impassioned speech on America's "byzantine" regulatory system during a Cabinet meeting at the White House on Thursday. "Right now, because of the byzantine...

    White House budget director Mick Mulvaney appeared to impress President Donald Trump with an impassioned speech on America's "byzantine" regulatory system during a Cabinet meeting at the White House on Thursday.

    "Right now, because of the byzantine nature of the way that we regulate in this country … if you make a cheese pizza, it's governed by the Food and Drug Administration. If you put a pepperoni on it, that's governed by the USDA [U.S. Department of Agriculture]," said Mulvaney, who also serves as acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

    Mulvaney continued to highlight the complicated regulatory system, and had plenty of examples prepared to make his point.

    If you have a chicken, it's governed by the USDA. If that chicken lays an egg, it's governed by the FDA. But if you break the egg and make it into an omelette, that is now covered again by the USDA. If you have an open-faced roast beef sandwich, that's one or the other, but you put the bread on top of it, it's the other one. A hot dog: the hot dog meat is governed by one; you put it in a bun it's governed by the other. One of my favorites, if you have a saltwater fish, you have a salmon and it's in the ocean, it's governed by the Department of Commerce. Once it swims up-river, it's governed by the Department of Interior. And to get there, it has to go up a fish ladder governed by the U.S Army Corps. of Engineers.

    "This is stupid," Mulvaney added. "This is just—this makes no sense."

    "By the way, that was incredibly said," Trump interjected. "I think you should put that on television, not what I said."

    Members of Trump's Cabinet seated around the room laughed in response.

    The post Mulvaney Impresses Trump With Impassioned Speech on the Country’s ‘Byzantine’ Regulatory System appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

    Federal Judge Throws Out CFPB Lawsuit Over Agency’s ‘Unconstitutional’ Structure

    Federal Judge Throws Out CFPB Lawsuit Over Agency’s ‘Unconstitutional’ Structure


    A New York federal judge on Thursday threw out a case brought by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), ruling that the agency's structure is unconstitutional. Senior U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska ruled that the CFPB does not have standing...

    A New York federal judge on Thursday threw out a case brought by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), ruling that the agency's structure is unconstitutional.

    Senior U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska ruled that the CFPB does not have standing to pursue cases because of its structure, contradicting a U.S. appeals court ruling from earlier this year, the Washington Post reports. That ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is not binding in New York, and Preska said she "respectfully" disagrees.

    "Because the CFPB's structure is unconstitutional, it lacks the authority to bring claims," Preska's ruling said.

    The conflicting rulings make it more likely that the Supreme Court takes up a case on the constitutionality of the CFPB's independent structure.

    "It will make the issue more attractive for the Court," said Allison Schoenthal, an attorney who represents banks before the CFPB and other regulators.

    The CFPB was created by the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, and Preska said that whole section of the law is illegal.

    "I would strike Title X in its entirety," the ruling said.

    The case in question was brought by the CFPB and New York's attorney general against RD Legal Finding, accusing the group of scamming injured former NFL players and 9/11 first responders. The state's attorney general can continue to pursue the claim, Preska ruled.

    David Willingham of Boies Schiller Flexner, which represents RD Legal, affirmed the ruling.

    "We are pleased that Court correctly found that the CFPB is unconstitutional as structured, and this underscores that the CFPB never should have brought this action in the first place," Willingham said.

    The latest ruling comes as the agency has also faced other controversy related to its independence from oversight. It is run by a single director and is funded by the Federal Reserve instead of Congress. CFPB's defenders claim those aspects are integral to its independence.

    The agency's critics consider it politically unaccountable thanks to its structure.

    Meanwhile, the Trump administration is facing a court case over whether the president lawfully appointed current acting CFPB chief Mick Mulvaney. A judge allowed Mulvaney to continue, even as progressives such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) claim Dodd-Frank prevents the president from appointing a new director at his pleasure.

    On Saturday, Trump nominated Kathleen Laura Kraninger to replace Mulvaney, who followed former director Richard Cordray. Cordray attempted to choose his chief of staff Leandra English to be his successor, but Trump chose Mulvaney, which led to a controversy over who was the lawful director.

    U.S. district judge Timothy Kelly said the CFPB director would have "unchecked authority" if English were given control of the bureau, creating "insulation from direct presidential control." English appealed, and it has not yet been ruled on by the D.C. circuit judges, the same court that ruled in favor of the bureau's constitutionality.

    The post Federal Judge Throws Out CFPB Lawsuit Over Agency’s ‘Unconstitutional’ Structure appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

    MSNBC’s Stephanie Ruhle Worries Detained Children Will Turn Into ‘Terminator-Like Characters’ Who ‘Seek Vengeance’

    MSNBC’s Stephanie Ruhle Worries Detained Children Will Turn Into ‘Terminator-Like Characters’ Who ‘Seek Vengeance’


    MSNBC host Stephanie Ruhle worried Friday that the detained children of illegal immigrants might one day turn into something akin to the Terminators from the James Cameron science-fiction film franchise. Ruhle made the comment while speaking to her...

    MSNBC host Stephanie Ruhle worried Friday that the detained children of illegal immigrants might one day turn into something akin to the Terminators from the James Cameron science-fiction film franchise.

    Ruhle made the comment while speaking to her guest, Dr. Dana Sinopoli, a psychologist who warned that the stress of family separation could permanently damage the psyche of many migrant children.

    "So to those who want to say, ‘I don't care about the welfare of these migrant children, I care about the welfare of my own children … my community,' help us understand what this kind of damage does to these young people," Ruhle said to Sinopoli.

    "Because they are going to be a member of society, and it makes me think, where do you think MS-13 was born? In Los Angeles, where you often see these angry gangs sprout up," Ruhle continued. "And I worry that you're creating Terminator-like characters that will seek vengeance! We must care."

    The Trump administration's zero-tolerance policy toward illegal border crossings has led many children to be separated from their parents, who are prosecuted for entering the U.S. illegally. This has triggered a fiery debate in the country about family separations at the border. This week, however, President Donald Trump signed an executive order to keep families together that are detained. Congress, meanwhile, is working on legislation to end family separation as part of a larger immigration package.

    The post MSNBC’s Stephanie Ruhle Worries Detained Children Will Turn Into ‘Terminator-Like Characters’ Who ‘Seek Vengeance’ appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

    CO Gov Candidate Condemns School Vouchers, But Sent Her Kids to Private Schools

    CO Gov Candidate Condemns School Vouchers, But Sent Her Kids to Private Schools


    Cary Kennedy, a former state treasurer now running for governor in Colorado, said she has been "blessed" to be able to send her own children to private school. But at the same time she is running on an education platform solidly opposed to voucher...

    Cary Kennedy, a former state treasurer now running for governor in Colorado, said she has been "blessed" to be able to send her own children to private school. But at the same time she is running on an education platform solidly opposed to voucher programs, which help move some children out of a failing public school and into a private school.

    Many on the right have long criticized these kinds of arrangements as fundamental hypocrisy on education policy, something Kennedy was asked about at a recently televised debate.

    "Cary, you're opposed to vouchers in education, and yet you sent your own kids to private school through eighth grade," said Shaun Boyd, a reporter with the local CBS affiliate. "What do you say to parents who want that same opportunity for their kids but can’t afford it?"

    "I don't support taking public money—public taxpayer money—out of the public education system to send it to private school in the form of vouchers." Kennedy went on to say she believes voucher systems leave the overall public school system with "diminishing resources."

    But Boyd pushed the issue.

    "But you would understand where some people would say, ‘This isn't fair, really. You send your own kids to private school,' but you say to them, ‘No, you've gotta stay in your failing neighborhood school and we're not going to help you with choice.'"

    "I feel really lucky, I feel blessed, that we were able to send our kids to a school that supported their individual learning needs. And I have worked on this issue my entire career because I believe every one of Colorado's kids deserves that great education."

    Going into the election season, the presumed front-runner in the primary has been Jared Polis, currently serving as the representative to Colorado’s Second Congressional District anchored in Boulder, a Democratic stronghold. Two recent polls show him with about a 10-point lead over Kennedy, with many undecideds remaining.

    According to Chalkbeat Colorado, Polis has twice claimed Kennedy was previously a supporter of vouchers, and Kennedy’s campaign has denied it both times.

    However, Alex Cranberg, one of the biggest donors and leading proponents of education reform in Colorado and other states, told the Free Beacon he remembers Kennedy as a voucher supporter around 2003.

    "Cary had a very supportive attitude toward my and Children’s Campaign work on vouchers for low income, poorly performing students at poorly rated schools," Cranberg told the Free Beacon via text. "She was at Childrens (sic) Campaign while the campaign worked hard with us on a legislative effort to ‘fix' some technical flaws on the basis of which the Supreme Court ruled."

    Cranberg was referring to a 2004 decision by the Colorado Supreme Court upholding a lower court ruling that the voucher law in question did not adhere to the state constitution for issues related to local control.

    "Cary has never supported vouchers and doesn’t believe public money should go to private schools," said Serena Woods with the Kennedy campaign. The campaign did not respond to a request to elaborate further on the debate response about private schooling.

    "It's ‘choice for me, not for thee,'" said John Schilling, president of the American Federation for Children, in an email. "We applaud families with means exercising school choice because they want what’s best for their children. But the notion that choice in K-12 education should be reserved only for families with means is appalling."

    Derrell Bradford is the executive vice president of 50can, an organization that advocates for charter schools and other choice options around the country. As a student, he went to both private and public schools, but says his time in private school was "life changing" and believes it may have been for others as well.

    "I don't begrudge anyone the right to send their child to the school that is the best fit," Bradford said. "Parents know their children best. But you cannot hold the position that it's great for you to be able to choose but not for others to make similar choices with a straight face. In a democratic primary you'd think there'd be some acknowledgment of the positive role private schools—and scholarships, government-funded or otherwise—play in the educational development of America's kids of color. Catholic schools and an elite independent day school in Hawaii gave us the country's first black president. Underperforming public schools and opposition to private school choice might be why it took so long."

    Given Polis's status as the front runner, Kennedy surprised many when she won a nonbinding straw poll at Democratic caucusing in March and then won a solid majority of the rank and file at the state party assembly in April, giving her the coveted top line on the primary ballot.

    Much of that success with party activists, however, is attributed to her backing from the Colorado Education Association (CEA), the state’s largest teachers’ union, and the likelihood that many of those who are politically motivated enough to go to caucus and to the state assembly are oftentimes also members of the CEA.

    This alliance between Kennedy and the CEA hasn't necessarily paved a smoother road for the candidate, either.

    For example, the CEA was just busted by a local television station for sending out "blatantly false" information to its members about another candidate in the contest, former state senator Mike Johnston.

    "The CEA was unable to explain why the fabricated claim was made," the report by KUSA noted.

    The report held the CEA accountable for the misinformation and not Kennedy, but it still was another instance in which a news story reminded voters that Kennedy has been accused of not adhering to the pledge all the Democratic candidates made to run a clean campaign with no attack ads precisely because of the messages and advertisements of third-party supporters.

    "Kennedy has refused to distance herself from negative attack ads funded by teachers' unions against her Democratic rivals, Johnston and Rep. Jared Polis," the KUSA report declared.

    The same Democratic assembly in which Kennedy won top line on the ballot was notable for other education moments. Delegates there told an organization known as Democrats for Education Reform (DFER) they could no longer use the word "Democrats" in their name.

    "DFER Colorado State Director Jennifer Walmer was clearly emotional as she defended her organizational and personal commitment to the Democratic Party," another report from Chalkbeat said. "She was booed throughout her remarks and stopped speaking at one point to ask to be allowed to continue."

    Mail ballots were distributed earlier this month, and as of Tuesday, just over 425,000 had been returned, according to the Colorado secretary of state’s office. Voting wraps up next Tuesday.

    Adding to the complexity, this year's vote in Colorado will be the first in which unaffiliated voters can participate in a party primary vote. However, an unaffiliated voter who wishes to do so can only vote in a single party primary. Yet the new wrinkle adds roughly 1.1 million new voters for Republicans and Democrats to chase, a population they’ve only had to appeal to in past general elections, but not party primaries. Unaffiliated voters outnumber both registered Republicans and Democrats, according to data from the secretary of state's office from February.

    The race has lacked the dropouts and consolidation behind a single candidate through endorsements that one might typically associate with a presidential race.

    A candidate must only win a plurality of votes in the primary to advance as the nominee, meaning that based on current polling, undecided or unaffiliated voters will likely have to break hard for Kennedy or for Johnston in order for either of them to steal the nomination from Polis.

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    At Candidate Forum, Only 1 of 10 Dem Hopefuls for Congress Says They’d Support Pelosi for Speaker

    At Candidate Forum, Only 1 of 10 Dem Hopefuls for Congress Says They’d Support Pelosi for Speaker


    At a forum held Thursday for the 10 Democrats running for Congress in New Hampshire's first district, only one candidate said they would support House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) for speaker of the House. New Hampshire political reporter...

    At a forum held Thursday for the 10 Democrats running for Congress in New Hampshire's first district, only one candidate said they would support House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) for speaker of the House.

    New Hampshire political reporter Paul Steinhauser captured the moment on Twitter.

    "If you are elected, if you go down to Washington, DC, and if the Democrats retake control of the [House of Representatives], would you support Nancy Pelosi as speaker?" the moderator asked the candidates. "If you would support her, raise your hand."

    2018 WATCH: Only one of the ten Democratic congressional candidates running in #nh01 who were taking part in a @hamptondems forum last night said they would support @NancyPelosi as House Speaker#nhpolitics #2018Midterms pic.twitter.com/j6NqiHTeDt

    — Paul Steinhauser (@steinhauserNH1) June 22, 2018

    Only one of the 10 Democratic candidates seated next to each other in a row raised their hand.

    An increasing number of Democrats have indicated that they do not want Pelosi, who served as speaker from 2007 to 2011, to remain in her leadership position. A recent report found that least 20 Democrats running for the House in November have publicly said they will not support Pelosi for speaker.

    Rep. Tim Ryan (D., Ohio), who unsuccessfully challenged Pelosi for House minority leader in 2016, has said the California Democrat does her party more harm than good in her leadership role.

    Rep. Carol Shea-Porter (D.) currently represents New Hampshire's first congressional district but said she will not run for reelection this year. The district is considered highly competitive and important for Democrats' hopes of retaking control of the House in November. Shea-Porter and Republican Frank Guinta traded victories for the district's congressional seat in several recent election cycles.

    One of the candidates running in the district's Democratic primary is Levi Sanders, the son of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.). The younger Sanders is running on a progressive platform similar to his father's that includes raising the minimum wage and free college.

    The post At Candidate Forum, Only 1 of 10 Dem Hopefuls for Congress Says They’d Support Pelosi for Speaker appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

    ABC Approves ‘Roseanne’ Spinoff Without Roseanne Barr

    ABC Approves ‘Roseanne’ Spinoff Without Roseanne Barr


    ABC announced Thursday that it will go forward with a spinoff of the popular sitcom "Roseanne," only without the eponymous character. The show's star, Roseanne Barr, was let go and the show was canceled abruptly three weeks ago following a racist tweet...

    ABC announced Thursday that it will go forward with a spinoff of the popular sitcom "Roseanne," only without the eponymous character.

    The show's star, Roseanne Barr, was let go and the show was canceled abruptly three weeks ago following a racist tweet by Barr, but ABC said in a release that the network is starting a new show about the Conner family without her.

    Barr stoked outrage on social media after she compared former Obama administration official Valerie Jarrett to an ape, and she will not be involved in the new show, tentatively titled "The Conners."

    "Roseanne Barr will have no financial or creative involvement in the new series," ABC said.

    The show will deal with "parenthood, dating, an unexpected pregnancy, financial pressures, aging, and in-laws in working-class America," ABC added. "Through it all, the fights, the coupon cutting, the hand-me-downs, the breakdowns—with love, humor, and perseverance, the family prevails."

    Barr agreed to let the show go forward without her and made a statement about the settlement she came to with the network.

    "I regret the circumstances that have caused me to be removed from ‘Roseanne,'" she said. "I agreed to the settlement in order that 200 jobs of beloved cast and crew could be saved, and I wish the best for everyone involved."

    "Roseanne" was a hit in the 1980s and 90s and returned to television last year after a two-decade hiatus. It immediately became the the highest-rated series on broadcast television but was cut short after Barr's tweet led ABC to issue an apology and cancel the show.

    "Roseanne's Twitter statement is abhorrent, repugnant, and inconsistent with our values, and we have decided to cancel her show," read a statement from ABC after the tweet.

    Bob Iger, CEO of ABC's parent company Disney, personally apologized to Jarrett for Barr's tweet, leading President Donald Trump to tweet about a double standard because Iger had not apologized for anything ABC commentators said about him.

    Barr, who had previously run for office on a left-wing platform, became a supporter of President Donald Trump in real life as well as in the show.

    The post ABC Approves ‘Roseanne’ Spinoff Without Roseanne Barr appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

    Inside the Ring: North Korea on Summit

    Inside the Ring: North Korea on Summit


    A review of North Korean state media provides key insights about Pyongyang’s approach to the issue of denuclearization. Based on a careful reading of official reports after the Singapore summit, North Korea appears to be signaling domestically that the...

    A review of North Korean state media provides key insights about Pyongyang’s approach to the issue of denuclearization.

    Based on a careful reading of official reports after the Singapore summit, North Korea appears to be signaling domestically that the government will pursue an arms agreement that the regime hopes eventually will lead to lifting economic sanctions. State-controlled North Korean propaganda outlets featured the summit in Singapore between President Trump and Kim Jong-un as a "great event" that promoted what was described as reconciliation, peace, stability and prosperity on the Korean Peninsula.

    On the topic of North Korea giving up its nuclear weapons, the ruling Korean Workers’ Party newspaper Rodong Sinmun, however, carefully referred to denuclearization in the context of the entire peninsula and not solely by North Korea. The newspaper stated in its report on the summit that Mr. Trump and Mr. Kim agreed to step-by-step "simultaneous" actions in the process of eliminating nuclear weapons.

    Read the entire article at the Washington Times.

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