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    48 Hours In Copenhagen

    48 Hours In Copenhagen


    There are many ways you can spend 48 hours in Copenhagen – this is just one suggestion! DAY ONE: 9AM: Caffeine and commence Grab a Danish pastry and coffee to wake up the right way – the Danish way. While there are many good locations around the...

    There are many ways you can spend 48 hours in Copenhagen – this is just one suggestion!

    DAY ONE:

    9AM: Caffeine and commence
    Grab a Danish pastry and coffee to wake up the right way – the Danish way. While there are many good locations around the city, one particular standout is this branch of Lagkagehuset (Frederiksberggade 21) on the main shopping street, Strøget. In addition to being a convenient starting point, the bakery offers some of the best pastries in the city. Take a number to order, and then pick from the many buns and cakes available for a sweet beginning to the day.

    10AM: Retail therapy on Strøget
    From Lagkagehuset, embark down Strøget, which is one of Europe’s longest pedestrian shopping streets. Browse well-known brands like Prada, Gucci and Louis Vuitton, and look out for some of the big local names, such as Sand Copenhagen, Mads Nørgaard and Acne Archive. Among the many shops are dozens of winding side-streets, each leading to another row of boutiques begging to be explored.

    12PM: Seafood in the harbour
    Just a minute’s walk from the end of Strøget is Nyhavn. As one of the most picturesque places in Copenhagen, it boasts a colourful row of colonial boathouses along a bustling harbour. Nyhavn is the perfect place to rest after a tiring morning of shopping and finding a cosy restaurant to sit in will not be a problem. If you’re looking for recommendations, Restaurant Gilleleje is an excellent choice. Open since 1876, the restaurant is still decorated with the items sailors used to pay for their meals. Or opt for the feel-good nostalgia of Heering Restaurant and Bistro, whose ‘Herring Platter’ is one of Copenhagen’s classic dishes.

    2PM: Perusing Parliament
    Now it’s time to turn around and follow the waterfront (or Strøget) back to Christiansborg Palace (Prins Jørgens Gård 1), a building with a rich history of firstly housing the Danish Royal Family and more recently the country’s Parliament and Supreme Court. Visitors are always welcome to tour parts of the building and explore the impressive collection of royal and national memorabilia. For just 150 kroner, take a look around the royal reception area (the rooms used for state visits by foreign leaders), the historic kitchens and stables, and the ruins beneath the palace.

    5PM: A night among the lights
    From Christiansborg head to Tivoli Gardens (Vesterbrogade 3), the second-oldest operating amusement park in the world. There you can find innumerable restaurants and diverse entertainment, including amusement rides as well as live music. The winding paths in the park are lined with warmly-colored lights, creating an unmissable atmosphere. Entry costs 120 kroner (a ride pass costs a lot more) and lasts until the park closes at midnight. Take a tip from the locals: skip the overpriced restaurants within the park and opt for a picnic on the lush lawn. All you have to do is bring your own food and blanket.

    DAY TWO:

    10AM: Alternative sightseeing
    Founded by squatters who took over an empty military barracks in the early 1970s, the ‘Freetown’ of Christiania is a bustling bohemian city within a city, distinct from Copenhagen thanks to its lackadaisical policy on street art and its open sale of cannabis. Don’t be put off by the name ‘Pusher Street’ as this commune has so much more to offer than drugs. The lively streets are brimming with personality, so make sure you take in some of the cosy cafes, inspired street music, and numerous art galleries. Guided tours are a great way to enjoy them – the Christianshavn Tour in English or Spanish leaves from Højbro Plads and lasts 90 minutes. This particular tour is highly rated – not only does it boast wonderful guides, but it’s free of charge, although you need to register in advance online.

    1PM: Organic lunch, historic church
    Grab lunch at one of the many organic cafes in Christiania before heading to the nearby Church of our Saviour (Sankt Annæ Gade 29) in Christianshavn. Built in 1696, the church has a view 90 metres above street level, allowing anyone who is brave enough to climb its 150 steps an amazing view of Copenhagen. The helix spire and paired winding staircase are famous not only for their unique look, but an urban legend that claims its architect killed himself by jumping off after realising it turned the wrong way (anticlockwise instead of clockwise). There is no truth to this myth, but it does serve to make the church that much more interesting to visit.

    3PM: King’s jewels and privates  
    If you enjoyed Christiansborg, you’ll love Rosenborg Castle – a quick trek back across the water and into town. Set within the beautiful Kongens Have (King’s Garden), the castle holds 400 years’ worth of royal art and regalia, including the Crown Jewels – a must-see embellishment of table-cut stones, enamel, and gold ornamentation. Make sure you visit the Knight’s Hall, which holds the coronation thrones, as well as the King’s private quarters. And then take a stroll around the gardens. Beautiful in their own right, the peaceful gardens offer respite from a hectic day. It should be noted that Rosenborg Castle is part of the museum district Parkmuseerne, for which a 195 kroner ticket grants you access to six museums in the nearby locale.

    7PM: New Nordic nourishment
    For dinner, try to get a booking at one of Copenhagen’s famous New Nordic restaurants. Over the last decade the cuisine has taken the world by storm by using local, seasonal produce to reinvent Scandinavian dishes. It’s true that establishments like Noma are impossible to get a reservation for, but others are better bets. Try Manfreds in Norrebro, PONY in Vestebro, or Host in central Copenhagen, among many others.

    9PM: After-dinner glints
    If you still have the energy after a long day and dinner, explore Copenhagen’s diverse nightlife. If you are interested in clubs, try Chateau Motel (Knabrostræde 3), which is close to Strøget, or Hive (Skindergade 45), another within walking distance of the main street. If you are too tired to dance but don’t want to end your night just yet, a bar might be a good idea. The nearby BrewPub Copenhagen (Vestergade 29) offers good beer and a cosy ambiance – a great place to unwind and chat to friends.

    Danish teams scrape through in Europe

    Danish teams scrape through in Europe


    It wasn’t pretty, but FC Copenhagen and FC Nordsjælland both managed to progress to the Europa League second qualification round yesterday evening. The Lions struggled mightily at home in Telia Parken stadium against Finnish outfit KuPS, but...

    It wasn’t pretty, but FC Copenhagen and FC Nordsjælland both managed to progress to the Europa League second qualification round yesterday evening.

    The Lions struggled mightily at home in Telia Parken stadium against Finnish outfit KuPS, but eventually made it through thanks to a late Denis Vavro penalty that gave them a 2-1 aggregate win.

    The Tigers meanwhile needed two second half strikes to overcome Northern Irish semi-pro team Cliftonville 3-1 on aggregate.

    READ MORE: 2018 WC: Denmark left to rue what could have been the luckiest draw of them all

    Nordic battles
    FCK will face Icelandic team Stjarnan next week in the second round of play, while FCN has a tougher task against current Swedish league leaders AIK.

    FC Midtjylland will take on Astana of Kazakhstan in the Champions League qualification, while Brøndby will be in the hat when UEFA draws the third qualification round for the Europa League on Monday.

    In related news, Brøndby has sold midfielder Christian Nørgaard to Serie A giants Fiorentina for around 26 million kroner.

    The 24-year-old, who joined BIF from Hamburg five years ago, signed a contract that will keep him in Fiorentina until 2022.

    Danish News in Brief: Record summer to keep on giving

    Danish News in Brief: Record summer to keep on giving


    Denmark’s historic summer looks set to continue over the next few weeks, according to the national weather forecasters, DMI. DMI predicts that temperatures will remain somewhere in the 23-28 degree realm and could breach the 30 degree mark in certain...

    Denmark’s historic summer looks set to continue over the next few weeks, according to the national weather forecasters, DMI.

    DMI predicts that temperatures will remain somewhere in the 23-28 degree realm and could breach the 30 degree mark in certain areas.

    “For the coming weeks of 30, 31 and 32 the weather situation will continue pretty much as it has been thanks to a stationary high-pressure system hovering about over Denmark,” DMI wrote.

    READ MORE: This summer is the Grinch that stole Christmas

    Historic year
    The summer of 2018 has already etched itself into the history books thanks to ample sunshine, high temperatures and a drought that has forced a nationwide ban on open fires and garden watering.

    DMI contends that this summer is likely already in the same category as other big drought years registered since 1874 – which are 1899, 1947, 1959, 1976 and 1992. But 2018 could end up surpassing them all.

    ”July looks to be very dry, perhaps record dry, and if August follows suit we risk passing the driest summer ever registered in 1976, when 49 mm of rain fell nationwide in June, July and August.

    Farmers get a hand
    But not everyone is loving the scorching summer and the Danish agriculture sector is languishing in a drought that could end up costing the industry billions of kroner. But now the sector has received some good news as the government has agreed to lend a helping hand. For a period of time, organic farmers will be permitted to reduce the content of roughage in cattle feed from 60 to 50 percent without losing their organic status. Moreover, it will be permitted for farmers to harvest hay on fallow land to use for feed and organic farmers will be allowed to use feed harvested from fields that are in the process of being converted to organic land.

    Micro business a boon
    A new report from the national statistics keepers, Danmarks Statistik, shows that the so-called micro businesses – with less than ten full-time employees – accounted for 70 percent of job growth in Denmark in recent years. The report also showed that small businesses accounted for 40 percent of growth measured in full-time employees. The report is based on figures from 2009-2016 and revealed that the micro business saw an increase of 35,433 full-time employees. Over the same period of time, job growth in medium and larger companies was far more meagre, while giga-companies saw a decrease in full-time employees by over 10,000.

    True to the game
    One of Denmark’s biggest ice hockey talents, Alexander True, took another step towards his NHL dream by signing an entry-level contract with the San Jose Sharks. The 21-year-old center spent last season with the San Jose Barracuda in the AHL, where he racked up 28 points in 68 games. True just misses out on becoming teammates with Danish NHL veteran Mikkel Bødker, who was traded to the Ottawa Senators earlier this summer.

    Firemen aiding Sweden
    A group of 27 Danish firefighters manning 8 vehicles are currently on the way north to Sweden to help fight one of the worst forest fires the country has seen. The volunteers have all agreed to cut short their holidays to assist the beleaguered Swedish fire fighting force, which is contending with 43 forest fires that are spreading across large parts of Jämtland and Dalarna regions. Aside from the Danes, Norwegian and Italian fire fighters have also helped out and the Swedes have asked the EU for additional assistance.

    Danish News in Brief: Number of eastern Europeans on benefits skyrocketing

    Danish News in Brief: Number of eastern Europeans on benefits skyrocketing


    According to new figures from Jobindsats.dk, the number of eastern Europeans receiving the unemployment benefit ‘dagpenge’ has skyrocketed in recent years. The figures revealed that there were over 5,000 eastern Europeans on dagpenge in April of this...

    According to new figures from Jobindsats.dk, the number of eastern Europeans receiving the unemployment benefit ‘dagpenge’ has skyrocketed in recent years.

    The figures revealed that there were over 5,000 eastern Europeans on dagpenge in April of this year, a significant increase from the 850 from April 2010. In fact, every 14th dagpenge recipient hails from Eastern Europe.

    “More foreigners are becoming aware of Danish wages and no longer accept low wages. Unfortunately, many of those demanding higher wages are pushed out and replaced with those who will,” Jens Arnholtz, a researcher at the Employment Relations Research Centre at the University of Copenhagen, told union magazine Fagbladet 3F.

    READ MORE: Most Danish foreign fighters have been on benefits

    In Pole position
    Poland and Romania account for the majority of eastern Europeans on dagpenge, with 1,617 and 1,439, followed by Bulgaria (629), Lithuania (552) and Latvia (245). In comparison, there are about 60,000 Danes on the benefits today, almost half of the number from 2010.

    But despite the spike, the Danish construction association, Dansk Byggeri, doesn’t see any issue with the development.

    “I don’t think 5,000 eastern Europeans on dagpenge is much, so it’s no problem at all. Eastern workers bring massive profit to the Danish labour market. Everyone will be needed and we still need more foreign labour,” Bo Sandberg, the head economist with Dansk Byggeri, told Fagbladet 3F.

    Fewer nuns and monks
    Unless something drastic happens, there won’t be any nuns and monks in Denmark before too long. Since WWII, and after the 1960s in particular, fewer Danes have signed up to dedicate their life to the church and celibacy. Currently there are under 100 nuns and monks in Denmark and the advanced age of many of the remaining means that monastery life looks set to come to an end. According to the Catholic research centre Cara, the number of men and women in monasteries has halved since the 1980s in Europe and the US.

    More noise complaints in CPH
    The number of noise complaints in Copenhagen last month was considerably higher than the June of 2017, according to data from City Hall. The city centre saw the most complaints with 784, followed by Nørrebro (304), Vesterbro (287), Copenhagen S (148) and Østerbro (113). The 48 percent increase in complaints compared to last year has been attributed to the warm summer this year, which has seen more people out on the streets and partying in apartment the windows open to allow cool air inside.

    Rats at Sluseholmen
    It is bad news for those who enjoy cooling off at Sluseholmen harbour pool after rats were found at the popular Copenhagen swim spot. Sluseholmen has been closed by the authorities until the issue can be resolved and no re-opening date was forthcoming. The authorities cited the closure as being due to rats being carriers of contagious diseases. Just four days ago, another harbour swimming venue in Aalborg was closed for the same reason.

    SAS up the rankings
    The Scandinavian airline SAS jumped up five spots on the annual Skytrax World Airline Rankings this week to settle in 60th position. Finnair was the best Nordic airline at 27th, followed by Norwegian at 32nd.  In related news, Copenhagen Airport urged travelers to remove the little stickers (see image below) that sometimes appear on bags during travel. The stickers – called bingotags – contain ID and route information that can be scanned – and having old ones on luggage can lead to bags missing flights.

    Queen of quizzes: Brian’s Brainteaser in association with the Globe Irish Pub

    Queen of quizzes: Brian’s Brainteaser in association with the Globe Irish Pub


    Brian’s Brainteaser in association with the Globe Irish Pub in Copenhagen is back, or at least for a special summer instalment, to give you something to ponder while you’re stuck in the office pretending to work. Or maybe you’re on holiday in...

    Brian’s Brainteaser in association with the Globe Irish Pub in Copenhagen is back, or at least for a special summer instalment, to give you something to ponder while you’re stuck in the office pretending to work.

    Or maybe you’re on holiday in Copenhagen trying to figure out what to do on Thursday August 2?

    It’s simple: answer the nine questions below and deduce what the answers have in common to solve Brian’s Brainteaser, and win a prize!

    READ MORE: Craicing the whip at the top of the Globe for 16 years and counting

    Trivia this Thursday
    The first correct submission sent to [email protected] will win free entry for a team of five to the Globe quiz on Thursday August 2, plus a pitcher of Carlsberg.

    The answers will be posted below once we have received a correct entry.

    Good Luck!

    Entry to the Globe Quiz costs 30 kroner per person, with a maximum of five in a team. The quiz consists of three rounds of 15 questions each.

    First prize is 1,000 kroner, second prize 500 kroner and third prize a crate of beer.

    There are also bonus questions at the end of each round – two chances to win a round of drinks for the entire team, and a rollover question currently standing at 4,000 kroner – and a raffle.

    The Globe Quiz officially starts at 19:30, but it’s advised you get there early (like 18:00-18:30) to ensure you get a table.

    Danish News in Brief: Research – 40 percent of multinational profit earmarked for tax havens

    Danish News in Brief: Research – 40 percent of multinational profit earmarked for tax havens


    Danish research from the University of Copenhagen has documented that 40 percent of surplus from multinational companies ends up in tax havens. The research is produced by the two Danish PhD students, Thomas Tørsløv and Ludvig Wier, in collaboration...

    Danish research from the University of Copenhagen has documented that 40 percent of surplus from multinational companies ends up in tax havens.

    The research is produced by the two Danish PhD students, Thomas Tørsløv and Ludvig Wier, in collaboration with the noted French economist, Gabriel Zucman.

    “Our research shows that about 40 percent of surplus generated by the multinational companies is moved every year to countries that have a low taxation,” Thomas Tørsløv, told Berlingske newspaper.

    “It’s long been discussed how to calculate these streams of funds from multinational firms to tax havens. We’ve done something as dull as to look into national accounts based on new OECD figures and we’ve landed on a conservative estimate of 40 percent based on new calculation methods.”

    READ MORE: Danish connection unearthed in latest tax haven leak

    Billions in Bermuda
    The research looks into the amount of profit created by the private sector in countries, as well as how much wage is paid. These key figures give an idea about the relationship between a company’s activities in a country and its surplus in that country.

    They can then see a significant different in surplus for local and multinational companies.

    “There is less profit for multinational companies in non-tax havens, while multinational companies operating in tax havens have abnormally high profit compared to their wage costs. In short, the local ice cream vendor in Bermuda has a normal surplus, while Google has an abnormal surplus on the island,” said Tørsløv.

    A specific example of this was seen in Ireland in 2015, where the difference between surplus and wages was at 800 percent in 2015 for multinational companies. Normally, the difference would be at 30-40 percent.

    Billions out of EU
    That’s the result of big international conglomerates such as Apple, Google, Nike and Starbucks shifting their surplus to tax haven nationals like Ireland or Bermuda to avoid paying much tax on the surplus. Google Alphabet, a holding company for Google, registered a surplus of 19.2 billion US dollars in 2016 – and that’s without any noteworthy activities or employees on the island.

    It is estimated that these tax moves by the big firms cost the EU some 450 billion kroner every year – 20 percent of company tax income. In fact, since 1985 the average global company tax percentage has fallen from 49 to 24 percent as countries lower taxes to remain competitive.

    ”It’s a clear picture: The companies move profit without moving activities. That’s why we call it ‘paper profits’ as the surplus only exists in Excel and is simply shifted around to where it’s most advantageous,” said Tørsløv.

    The tax haven issue has risen into the spotlight in recent years thanks to the Panama Papers and Paradise Papers leaks.

    Dreaded caterpillar hits Bornholm
    Several people on Bornholm were forced to seek medical help at the local hospital after coming into contact with toxic oak processionary moth caterpillars over the weekend. The caterpillars are covered in thousands of toxic hairs that it can emit from itself if bothered and the hairs can cause rashes, itchiness and respiratory problems. The authorities warned citizens to stay away from the handball-sized caterpillar webs in the trees near Dueodde and to avoid touching the caterpillars, dead or alive. Pets and other animals can also become very ill from sniffing the larvae. The caterpillars are usually found in southern Europe, but lately the larvae have been discovered further up north, including in the UK.

    Firemen busy as drought continues
    The ongoing drought in Denmark has fire stations across the country working overtime as the lack of rain has made the dry landscape more susceptible to fire hazards. According to the authorities, there have been 469 nature fires in the first half of July alone – an average of 31 fires every day – easily surpassing the previous mark for the entire month which stood at 449. While the authorities maintain that they have put out all the fires so far, they admit to not possessing equipment allowing them to fight fire from the air.

    Denmark invests in Bolivian wind
    The government as announced that it intends to invest 300 million kroner into wind turbine parks in Bolivia. The parks are scheduled to be completed by 2020 and will provide green energy to about 1 million people. Bolivia has a goal to provide stable energy supply to 95 percent of its population by 2020. Vestas has been charged with building the parks – the first project for the Danish wind energy giant in Bolivia. More specifically, the parks will be located near Santa Cruz and will produce a total of 108 MW. Some 11 million people live in Bolivia, one of the poorest countries in South America.

    B&O turns it around
    The Danish tech company Bang & Olufsen has managed to turn several years of downturn into a positive financial year for 2017-2018. Turnover increased by 11 percent and profit by 81 million kroner compared to the previous financial year, which saw a deficit of 117 million kroner. B&O head Henrik Clausen said the turnaround was down to a change in business model, the launch of innovative products and a boost in branding and distribution. It’s the first profit for the company since the 14-15 financial year and it expects an increase in turnover of at least 10 percent for next year. The company has 284 shops in Europe, 14 in North America, 31 in China and 81 in the rest of the world

    Danish News in Brief: Danes can best afford meat

    Danish News in Brief: Danes can best afford meat


    According to the latest Meat Price Index, published by the online catering firm Caterwings, Danes on minimum wage can more easily afford meat products than their counterparts in other countries. The index (here in English) showed that Danes on minimum...

    According to the latest Meat Price Index, published by the online catering firm Caterwings, Danes on minimum wage can more easily afford meat products than their counterparts in other countries.

    The index (here in English) showed that Danes on minimum wage need to work the fewest hours to be able to afford a kilo of beef, chicken, pork or lamb. And only the Swedes have to work less to be able to afford to purchase a kilo of fish.

    Danes on minimum wage need only work one hour to be able to pay for one kilo of beef, 0.3 hours for a kg of chicken, 1.2 hours for a kg of fish, 0.7 hours for a kg of pork and one hour for a kg of lamb.

    READ MORE: Danish experts: baby food in pouches can impact development

    Meat munchers
    The results also showed that the Danes were among the biggest meat consumers in the world per capita, ranking seventh – every Dane on average eating 95.2 kg of meat per year.

    At the opposite end of the spectrum, India was the ‘leader’. A person on minimum wage in India needs to work over 30 hours to afford one kg of fish, pork or lamb, over 20 hours for beef and over 10 hours for chicken.

    The index compares the minimum wage of 52 countries and compares the prices of 13 different meat products – such as mince meat, chicken breast, salmon, sausage, ham and lamb chops.

    It’s important to underline that the index does not take in net earnings into account but rather only gross income.

    Vestergaard sets the mark
    Just a month after Thomas Delaney set the record for the biggest transfer in history involving a Danish footballer, a new record has been set. Jannik Vestergaard has set the new mark following a 186 million kroner transfer to Southampton from Bundesliga outfit Borussia Mönchengladbach. The towering defender will join countryman Pierre-Emile Højbjerg at the Saints, who narrowly avoided relegation from the Premier League last season. The 25-year-old left Brøndby for the Bundesliga at just 17 and played about 200 games for the likes of Hoffenheim, Werder Bremen and Mönchengladbach. He also has 16 caps for Denmark and was part of the Danish team that participated at the 2018 World Cup in Russia. Other big moves involving Danish players so far this summer include Daniel Wass shifting from Celta Vigo to Valencia and Riza Durmisi leaving Real Betis for Lazio.

    Entry fee not an earner
    Two years after the Danish government coerced the nation’s culture institutions to usher in entry fees due to austerity measures, the National Gallery of Denmark has revealed that the move has not led to any profit. The gallery revealed that it has not only failed to make a profit, but it has also lost a quarter of its visitors. According to its figures, its visitor numbers plummeted from 451,000 in 2015 to 334,000 last year. The museum said that it had expected the visitor numbers to drop based on similar experiences from the UK and Sweden.

    PKK arrest in Denmark
    A high-level member of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) has been was arrested in Denmark on Friday, according to the state prosecutor. The 58-year-old Turkish citizen was arrested near Rødbyhavn after arriving from Germany. An international warrant for his arrest had been issued for him by Turkey and according to the Turkish media outlet Daily Sabah, the man is PKK’s co-ordinator in Scandinavia. Now it is up to the state prosecutor to ascertain whether there are grounds for him to be extradited to Turkey and until then he is being held in remand in Denmark until July 27. PKK is banned in Turkey and has been listed as a terror organisation in a number of other countries.

    Zoo fencing out the foxes
    Aalborg Zoo has been forced to invest millions of kroner on new fox-proof fences following the untimely demise of several of its inhabitants. Aside from a number of flamingos, peacocks and rhea birds being devoured by the crafty foxes, several other animals have been eaten. The zoo has tried to combat the problem using traps and locking up the animals during the night, but doing so is not optimal. The new fences are dug deeper into the ground and give electric shocks to foxes trying to climb over. The fence is expected to be completed by September 1, after which the zoo will round up the 4-8 foxes that have made their home in the zoo.

    A world without porpoise: the killings that made us blubber

    A world without porpoise: the killings that made us blubber


    Denmark doesn’t kill whales; it likes them. That much was clear when a hump-back was sighted in early June in the Kattegat off the northeast coast of Jutland. “It’s totally wild,” said the ancient mariner who spotted it – yes, literally and...

    Denmark doesn’t kill whales; it likes them. That much was clear when a hump-back was sighted in early June in the Kattegat off the northeast coast of Jutland. “It’s totally wild,” said the ancient mariner who spotted it – yes, literally and figuratively.

    And that would appear to be the national inclination: let them roam free in the big blue ocean. Accordingly, we only hear about the rare sightings and when they get washed up on beaches.

    But that isn’t the whole truth, as it wasn’t that long ago that Denmark was indisputably a whaling nation, and no, this has nothing to do with the Grindadráp, the annual slaughter of around 800 pilot whales on the Faroe Islands, a territory of the Danish Kingdom that every year results in widespread condemnation across the planet.

    A whale of a problem
    The world tends to describe the likes of Japan, Norway and even Iceland as whaling nations, but rarely Denmark. However, just 30 years ago it was reported that Danish fishermen were technically some of the most prolific whalers in the world, with an annual catch of approximately 7,000.

    Now, we’re not talking about the type of whales seen in Greenpeace videos. The whale in question was the common or harbour porpoise, a much smaller creature, of which almost half of the 700,000 at large in the world live in the North Sea area close to Denmark, making it the only species of whale that breeds in Danish waters.

    Tragically, many of these small mammals were being needlessly killed every year after getting tangled up in fishermen’s nets and subsequently drowning. Porpoises need to surface to breathe about every four minutes.

    Something needed to be done, and Denmark became a co-signatory of the Agreement on the Conservation of Small Cetaceans of the Baltic and North Seas in the early 1990s.

    With several countries on board to make a difference, a breakthrough came in 2001: the introduction of underwater sonar alarms to warn the sound-sensitive porpoises that they were entering heavily-netted waters. The technology has been a success and far fewer porpoises are today being killed as bycatch.

    Dolphin’s less fun cousin
    The porpoise (Phocoena Phocoena) is a small species of whale closely related to the dolphin. They are generally smaller than dolphins, bluish in colour on top and white below, and have rounded conical heads that lack the dolphin’s characteristic beak. They usually grow to about one and a half metres long and weigh about 50kg.

    Instead of vaulting out of the water like dolphins, they make wheel-like rolls, and they do not play in the bow waves or wakes of ships as dolphins tend to do. The porpoise is normally found around tidal estuaries and the inlets of large rivers, and they are rarely seen in the open ocean.

    The porpoise lives off fish – particularly herring, mackerel and cod. They often travel in small schools that make explosive exhalations when they surface. In waters where visibility is bad, they use their sense of hearing to navigate and search out food. ln open waters, the porpoise’s most feared enemy is the killer whale. In Danish waters, its only enemy is man.

    Like most mammals the relationship between the mother and her young is close. At birth these small whales are approximately half the length of their mothers. The porpoise feeds its young one at a time and helps them to the water’s surface for their first gasp of air. Offspring are usually born in open waters, but the mother will soon take her young to shallower waters that offer richer feeding grounds.

    The age of sexual maturity is between three and four years, and it is common for porpoises to live to be about 13 years old.

    A history of blubber
    The porpoise has been hunted in Denmark since the Stone Age, but methods became more organised and prolific in the Middle Ages when it was common to cook porpoise blubber in wine and use it as a treatment for dropsy (oedema).

    Other early remedies included grinding the ashes of crushed porpoise teeth into the gums as an apparent cure for toothache. Sailors also considered porpoise tails good luck to have on board.

    It is estimated that approximately 140,000 porpoises were hunted and killed in the 19th century. At the time porpoise blubber was burned for lighting and their intestines were used as sausage skins. Only the poor ate porpoise blubber as according to a description from 1774 the meat was “fishy and stinky and sumptuous feast for swineherd”.

    The number of porpoises substantially decreased to the point they became a protected species in 1967. However, the accidental killing continued, attracting severe criticism from animal protection agencies and over the next three decades, the pressure to take action unsuprisingly increased, as the killings without purpose were in danger of giving Denmark waters without porpoises.
    Today, thanks to the widespread use of underwater alarm systems, the porpoise can again flourish in the cool Danish waters it likes to call home.

    About Town: Bertel’s burgers – all the folks love them

    About Town: Bertel’s burgers – all the folks love them


    Half of the Danish elite were island-hopping to Bornholm for Folkemødet, the brainchild of former minister Bertel Haarder, in mid-June Joe Biden (second left), the former US vice-president, was a participant at the Copenhagen Democracy Summit on June...

    Half of the Danish elite were island-hopping to Bornholm for Folkemødet, the brainchild of former minister Bertel Haarder, in mid-June

    Joe Biden (second left), the former US vice-president, was a participant at the Copenhagen Democracy Summit on June 22, where he lunched with Danish PM Lars Løkke Rasmussen (left) and former PM Anders Føgh Rasmussen (right)

    A bicycle-themed gathering was held in the city centre to honour French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand (right), who is best known for his book ‘Earth from Above’, on June 10. He was joined by French ambassador Francois Zimeray (left)

    South Korean ambassador Choi Jai-Chul (sunglasses) was among those in attendance at the Kimchi Festival, a celebration of Korean food and culture at Torvehallerne in central Copenhagen

    US ambassador Carla Sands (left) was among the guests at a concert at Tivoli Concert Hall on June 24 marking the centenary of the birth of US conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein

     

    Museums Corner: Let nobody say they’re a stay-at-home nation!

    Museums Corner: Let nobody say they’re a stay-at-home nation!


    The great outdoors has never ceased being an inspiration to the way Danes live – New Nordic cuisine, for example, owes everything to the way the locals get the most out of their environment. From the Viking longboats that opened up new horizons and the...

    The great outdoors has never ceased being an inspiration to the way Danes live – New Nordic cuisine, for example, owes everything to the way the locals get the most out of their environment.

    From the Viking longboats that opened up new horizons and the calming rural environment that provided the heartbeat of the nation for centuries, to the beautiful gardens that fuelled the minds of the literary elite and the scientific approach to zoos, the Danes have a deep understanding of nature and its potential.

    So what’s stopping you this summer! Get a bit of fresh air while exploring the great outdoor venues and museum parks of Copenhagen.

    A breath of history
    Open Air Museum (Frilandsmuseet), Kongevejen 100, Kongens Lyngby; open Tue-Sun 10:00-16:00, closed Mon; free adm; natmus.dk
    The Open Air Museum takes you back in time. Get a taste of old Danish country life with all its buildings, objects, gardens and domestic animals. The museum shows Denmark’s history from 1650 to 1940 in a living exhibition where you have the chance to explore the culture and lifestyle of centuries past.  The buildings are accurately recreated to give you an understanding of people’s changing occupations and roles in society through time. In order to illustrate the life of old town communities even better, the staff are dressed up in coeval costumes and work with crafts. In the summer period you can take part in many different activities and workshops every day, from following the beekeepers at work to meet the animals of the museum. Plan to spend plenty of time here and bring a picnic basket for the full outdoor experience.

    Take a walk with the wildlife
    Copenhagen Zoo, Roskildevej 32, Frederiksberg; open daily 09:00-18:00; over-12s: 195kr (180kr after Aug 12), under-12s: 100kr, under-3s free adm; zoo.dk
    A popular activity among kids is going to the zoo. Copenhagen Zoo is a local favourite and not like any other zoo you have visited before. The zoo is very active in the field of science and the breeding of endangered species, which is why you will have the rare opportunity to see a rhinoceros juvenile. The zoo has animals from all over the world, so you can travel to multiple continents within a day, from the African savannah to the North Pole – visit the new underground tunnel to see the polar bear swimming by. You can bring your own lunch and eat outside or purchase food in the park.

    Jump aboard the Viking world
    Viking Ship Museum, Vindeboder 12, Roskilde; open daily 10:00-17:00; 100kr, under-18s free adm; vikingeskibsmuseet.dk
    The Viking Ship Museum is the only place in the world where you can walk straight from the museum to Viking ship reconstructions built in the manner of the original 1,000-year-old models. Between 1 May and 30 September 2018 you can come aboard to sail in Roskilde Fjord and feel the wind blowing in the big sails just like the Vikings. See reconstructed models and maps of how Denmark and the North used to look 1,000 years ago. Learn how the Vikings built their ships and why it remains an important aspect of Denmark’s cultural heritage and history.

    Stroll through the Golden Age
    Bakkehuset, Rahbeks Alle 23, Frederiksberg; open Tue-Sun 11:00-17:00, closed Mon; 50kr, under-18s free adm; bakkehusmuseet.dk
    Bakkehuset is a literary and cultural history museum in Frederiksberg. The museum is situated in what used to be the apartment of the author couple Kamma and Knud Rahbek. They ended their days here in 1829 and 1830 respectively. Kamma Rahbek’s beautiful restored romantic garden is rich in rare flowers. The Orangery is open daily through the summer and is a great place in which to sit back and enjoy the surroundings. The museum invites you into a time warp, away from the busy life of the city. Check the website to keep up with events and changing exhibitions. Guided tours in English are offered every day.

    For more inspiration from Copenhagen Museums and Attractions, visit cphmuseums.com