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    Cops Seek Carjacking, Burglary Suspect

    Cops Seek Carjacking, Burglary Suspect


    LAS VEGAS (KXNT) – Las Vegas police were searching for a man suspected in a carjacking as well as a home burglary, which ended when the suspect got into a fight with the returning resident, authorities said. Investigators were looking for 43-year-old...

    LAS VEGAS (KXNT) – Las Vegas police were searching for a man suspected in a carjacking as well as a home burglary, which ended when the suspect got into a fight with the returning resident, authorities said.

    Investigators were looking for 43-year-old Norberto Espinoza in connection with the crimes, including the burglary that happened at a townhome located near the intersection of East Desert Inn Road and Cabana Drive around noon on Nov. 10, a Las Vegas Metro Police statement reported.

    After returning home to check on an active alarm, the resident told police an unknown vehicle filled with the victim’s property was parked in the home’s driveway.

    The resident blocked the vehicle in the driveway and confronted the suspect, who was sitting inside the vehicle. The victim got into a fight with the suspect, and the suspect fled on foot before police could arrive. However, the victim was able to take a photo of the suspect before he fled.

    Officers determined the vehicle was stolen in a carjacking in a residential neighborhood near the intersection of South Lamb Boulevard and East Vegas Valley Drive on Oct. 31. In that incident, the suspect approached the victim inside the vehicle and demanded the car at gunpoint.

    The suspect from that incident matched the description of the suspect in the burglary. Also located nearby was another stolen vehicle taken in another carjacking reported on October 29.

    Anyone with any information about any of these events, or the whereabouts of Norberto Espinoza, was asked to call the Southeast Area Command Patrol Investigations Section at 702-828-8242.

    Trooper: Vegas-Bound Camaro Sought After Fatal Hit-Run

    Trooper: Vegas-Bound Camaro Sought After Fatal Hit-Run


    PAHRUMP, Nev. (AP) — The Nevada Highway Patrol is looking for a Chevrolet Camaro after car parts were found at the scene of an overnight crash that killed man walking on a highway in the community of Pahrump. Trooper Jason Buratczuk said Friday that...

    PAHRUMP, Nev. (AP) — The Nevada Highway Patrol is looking for a Chevrolet Camaro after car parts were found at the scene of an overnight crash that killed man walking on a highway in the community of Pahrump.

    Trooper Jason Buratczuk said Friday that investigators think the Camaro was headed toward Las Vegas on State Route 160, and may have left-front-end damage after striking the pedestrian about 1:30 a.m. not far from Homestead Road.

    The name of the man who was killed wasn’t immediately made public, and Buratczuk says it’s not yet clear why he was in the roadway.

    The Camaro driver is expected to face a felony hit-and-run charge.

    Buratczuk didn’t say what car parts were found, but said they appeared to have come from a 2010-2013 model Camaro.

    LVMPD Begin Testing Acoustic Gunshot Detection System

    LVMPD Begin Testing Acoustic Gunshot Detection System


    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Las Vegas police have begun testing a network of acoustic gunshot sensors in a section of the city to see if it helps cut the time officers take to arrive at shootings. Department and elected officials announced Thursday the...

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Las Vegas police have begun testing a network of acoustic gunshot sensors in a section of the city to see if it helps cut the time officers take to arrive at shootings.

    Department and elected officials announced Thursday the ShotSpotter system is being deployed in an area northeast of downtown where police are called most often to investigate gunfire reports.

    Capt. Jim LaRochelle, the area commander, didn’t say exactly where the sensors are being placed. He said they are installed above the ground, in places such as buildings, and are not designed as microphones to pick up conversational speech.

    They are designed to identify pops or booms that that might be gunshots, triangulate the location, analyze the sound by computer and direct the data to a human analyst to notify police, officials said.

    Installation is part of a one-year pilot program designed to detect, locate and alert police of gunfire in less than a minute, which officials said could be faster than it would take for a person to determine if and where the shots were fired and decide to pick up the phone and call 911.

    People in some neighborhoods where gunfire is frequent may not call police at all, LaRochelle said. But he said police hope people will still make those calls.

    Officials said plans call for adding sensors in two other Las Vegas police command areas in coming months.

    ShotSpotter says more than 40 police agencies use the system, including Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Denver, New York, Chicago, Miami and the California cities of Sacramento, Fresno, and San Diego.

    Nevada Seeks to Use Untried Execution Drugs Including Opioid

    Nevada Seeks to Use Untried Execution Drugs Including Opioid


    LAS VEGAS (AP) — For Nevada’s first execution in more than a decade, state officials are turning to a never-before-tried combination of drugs, including a powerful painkiller that is fueling much of the opioid epidemic and a paralyzing drug that...

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — For Nevada’s first execution in more than a decade, state officials are turning to a never-before-tried combination of drugs, including a powerful painkiller that is fueling much of the opioid epidemic and a paralyzing drug that could mask any signs of trouble.

    If the state’s highest court approves the plan and it works without complications, the system could offer an alternative execution method to other states seeking hard-to-obtain drugs for lethal injections. But the drugs also carry serious risks, and their use in an execution could invite new shortages of medication used for surgery and pain relief.

    “It’s an experiment,” said Deborah Denno, a law professor and lethal injection expert at Fordham University in New York. “It sounds like a high-risk venture. Even trained people can’t claim to know what’s going to happen.”

    None of the drugs — the sedative diazepam, the painkiller fentanyl and the paralytic cisatracurium — has been used in executions before.

    Fentanyl has been at the center of the opioid crisis, with thousands of overdose deaths blamed on heroin laced with the synthetic opioid that often enters the U.S. from China and other countries. A fentanyl overdose killed Prince in 2016.

    An execution using diazepam, commonly known as Valium, along with high doses of fentanyl, could risk complications such as vomiting, which is common in people experiencing fentanyl overdoses.

    “It could be ugly,” said Jonathan Groner, a Columbus, Ohio, surgeon and lethal injection expert.

    Using fentanyl for an execution could also spur drugmakers in the U.S. and abroad to pull the legal version of the drug from the market in protest, Groner said, which could cut the supply for other legitimate purposes.

    A similar scenario occurred several years ago after Missouri announced a plan to become the first state to put an inmate to death using propofol, the powerful anesthetic blamed for the 2009 death of Michael Jackson. An outcry from the medical community helped scrap that approach.

    Using a paralytic as a third drug could prevent body movements and disguise any suffering the condemned inmate might experience, Groner said.
    The paralytic agent “pretty much ensures that if an execution is botched, we won’t know it,” he said.

    The Nevada judge who delayed the execution of Scott Raymond Dozier cited concerns about “masking” pain and suffering when she balked at letting Nevada prison officials use cisatracurium.

    Clark County District Court Judge Jennifer Togliatti said the state could go forward with the execution but only with diazepam and fentanyl.

    An attorney representing state Attorney General Adam Laxalt rejected that idea and said state officials would appeal to the Nevada Supreme Court, despite the wishes of Dozier, a 46-year-old twice convicted of murder. He has volunteered to die and said in court that he does not care if he suffers.

    A stay of execution was filed Tuesday, the same day Dozier’s death had been scheduled. Written arguments have not yet been submitted to the seven-member state high court, and a court spokesman said Thursday it wasn’t immediately known if justices would hold hearings or make a ruling based on court filings.

    The Nevada execution protocol was developed by a state chief medical officer, an anesthesiologist, who resigned two weeks ago but said his departure had nothing to do with the execution.

    If it goes according to plan, the diazepam will put Dozier to sleep, followed by the fentanyl, which will depress his breathing enough to kill him. Then the cisatracurium is supposed to make death a certainty.

    But an expert medical witness testified that if anything goes wrong with the first two drugs, and Dozier is still alive when the paralytic is administered, he could be left aware, unable to move and suffering “air hunger” until he suffocates.

    If Dozier experiences awareness, “it would be a horrific experience,” said Dr. David Waisel, a Harvard University anesthesiology professor presented as an expert witness by federal public defenders challenging Nevada’s three-drug protocol.

    Some other death-penalty states are already following Nevada’s lead in the hopes that the drug combination might provide a new execution method without the difficulty of obtaining drugs made by European companies opposed to the death penalty.

    Nebraska last week proposed using the same three drugs along with potassium chloride — to stop the heart — for a yet-to-be scheduled execution next year.

    The 31 states in the U.S. with the death penalty have wrestled with finding lethal injection drugs since pharmaceutical manufacturers stopped making some products available. Some executions using substitute drugs resulted in slow, apparently agonizing deaths.

    Executions in Arizona were placed on hold after convicted killer Joseph Rudolph Wood took nearly two hours to die in 2014 after receiving a two-drug combination — the anesthetic midazolam and the painkiller hydromorphone.

    Most death-penalty states are reaching for untried options, said Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, a nonprofit that charts how states carry out executions.

    “Sometimes they’re guessing, and sometimes they’re just desperate,” Dunham said.

    “Sometimes you can guess and get lucky,” he added. “But we’re in a position where everyone is just holding their breath hoping it doesn’t go wrong.”

    Woman And Two Children Shot At While Stopped At An Intersection

    Woman And Two Children Shot At While Stopped At An Intersection


    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A car at an Aberdeen intersection with a mother and two small children inside was struck by gunshots Thursday night according to police. Authorities were called to the scene at 6:42 p.m. and say two suspects fired multiple shots...

    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A car at an Aberdeen intersection with a mother and two small children inside was struck by gunshots Thursday night according to police.

    Authorities were called to the scene at 6:42 p.m. and say two suspects fired multiple shots towards the vehicle at the intersection of Roosevelt Avenue and Post Road. Police say the car was struck multiple times, endangering the mother and her children’s lives.

    No one was injured. Police say it does not appear to be a random act of violence. They say the victim was purposely targeted.

    Anyone with information is asked to call Detective Testerman at 410-272-2121. All calls are confidential.

    Follow @CBSBaltimore on Twitter and like WJZ-TV | CBS Baltimore on Facebook

    Baltimore Mayor Says City Is Ready For Winter

    Baltimore Mayor Says City Is Ready For Winter


    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — While there may not be any snow on the ground, the winter season is just around the corner. Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh says the Department of Public Works is ready for the season. Since last winter, the city has replaced more...

    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — While there may not be any snow on the ground, the winter season is just around the corner.

    Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh says the Department of Public Works is ready for the season. Since last winter, the city has replaced more than 300 snow removal vehicles. There’s also a new salt and salt brine facility on North Avenue.

    The city is also hiring students between the ages of 14 and 21 interested in part-time snow removal jobs. For more information, call 3-1-1.

    Follow @CBSBaltimore on Twitter and like WJZ-TV | CBS Baltimore on Facebook

    Testimony Over In Administrative Hearing For Police Lieutenant

    Testimony Over In Administrative Hearing For Police Lieutenant


    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A decision on whether to fire a police lieutenant could come down from a police advisory board on Friday. Testimony is over in the administrative hearing for Lieutenant Brian Rice.  He was the ranking officer the day Freddie Gray...

    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A decision on whether to fire a police lieutenant could come down from a police advisory board on Friday.

    Testimony is over in the administrative hearing for Lieutenant Brian Rice.  He was the ranking officer the day Freddie Gray was arrested and suffered fatal injuries.

    Rice was acquitted of all criminal charges last year. He faced 10 charges before a police board.

    The charges against Rice stem from policies that do require officers to seat belt prisoners, and from policies to use force of investigations. The officers who have testified said they rarely, if ever, seat belted prisoners before Gray’s death.

    Evidence presented in hearings includes a log of Lieutenant Rice’s e-mails showing he got 1,000 pages of e-mail attachments in four days. Somewhere in those pages was a memo on the new seat belt policy.

    If he’s found guilty of even one charge, he could lose his job.

    Follow @CBSBaltimore on Twitter and like WJZ-TV | CBS Baltimore on Facebook

    ‘InstaMom’ Influencers Making Thousands As Social Media Brand Ambassadors

    ‘InstaMom’ Influencers Making Thousands As Social Media Brand Ambassadors


    STUDIO CITY (CBSLA) — Social media sites like Instagram and Snapchat are still often derided as child’s play, but the platforms have been huge sources of income for young, so-called “influencers.” Now, moms are also cashing in on their parental...

    STUDIO CITY (CBSLA) — Social media sites like Instagram and Snapchat are still often derided as child’s play, but the platforms have been huge sources of income for young, so-called “influencers.” Now, moms are also cashing in on their parental popularity and getting paid to post.

    Carly Anderson, who runs the blog Lipgloss and Crayons, is one of those women profiting from documenting their daily duties on their “mommy blogs” and Instagram. She told CBS2 News it’s like product placement you see on TV shows: pose with a product, then wait for the cash to roll in — eventually, anyway.

    “I would say it’s gonna take a year or two,” says Anderson. Though it’s on “the Insta,” the money is not instant. “You don’t get a paycheck the first month, or the second or third,” but when you do, it can be up to $1,000 to $3,000 per campaign.

     

    Still, it’s exciting if you think you’re just posting a photo of the family.

    “I told my husband. I was like, “Babe, they emailed! They want to pay me!” laughs InstaMom Claudia Felix-Garay. She runs The Penny Closet.

     

    Companies wanting moms as brand ambassadors makes sense. According to The Sway Group, an influencer marketing company, mothers control about 85 percent of household purchases, which accounts for $2.4 trillion.

    Moms also spend roughly 3 1/2 hours a day online, making social media and influencing a marketing match made in heaven.

    For anyone thinking about becoming a mom influencer, Anderson and Felix-Garay say it’s important to keep the posts “you” — stick to the products that support your brand, but don’t overwhelm your followers with sponsored posts.

    But what happens when the co-star of your Internet-famous photos doesn’t want to be in them anymore?

    “When he gets to the point he says, ‘I don’t want to take pictures,’ we have to respect that,” says Felix-Garay.

    “If she did say ‘no,’ the answer would be ‘no,'” echoes Anderson.

    Though it takes a lot to get to the top, like most things, “If you’re consistent and have great quality, there should be no problem for you to get up there and succeed,” assures Felix-Garay.

    Both moms use professional photographers for their posts, and they make sure to follow FTC rules and label photos that pay as “ad” or “sponsored.”

    ‘Great Streets’ Road Diet ‘Destroyed My Life And Ruined My Family,’ Says Mar Vista Restaurateur

    ‘Great Streets’ Road Diet ‘Destroyed My Life And Ruined My Family,’ Says Mar Vista Restaurateur


    MAR VISTA (CBSLA) — A Mar Vista businessman says a road diet meant to improve traffic on his street ended his dream of selling food where his grandfather did the same more than 60 years ago. “It was a beautiful family legacy,” restaurateur John...

    MAR VISTA (CBSLA) — A Mar Vista businessman says a road diet meant to improve traffic on his street ended his dream of selling food where his grandfather did the same more than 60 years ago.

    “It was a beautiful family legacy,” restaurateur John Atkinson told CBS2 News as he wiped a tear from his eye. “You’re gonna make me tear up because this is what we wanted to do.”

    The owner of the recently shuttered Louie’s in Mar Vista says business at his restaurant and bar plummeted after new bike lanes and parking were placed on either side of Venice Boulevard near Grand View earlier this year.

    Atkinson admits his decision to run his other business full-time contributed to his eatery closing, but he called the road diet “the last nail in the coffin.”

    This is not the first criticism of the street re-channeling project. This summer, angry residents lashed out area Councilman Mike Bonin at a town hall, saying the road diet was causing so much congestion, it was a public safety concern. They said the traffic would prevent an easy egress from the area in case of a natural disaster.

    Bonin did not reply to a request for a statement from CBS2.

    The project was part Mayor Eric Garcetti’s Great Streets Initiative, which calls for the removal of a lane for cars to create a bike lane and parking along a main thoroughfare in every Los Angeles council district.

    The owner of Venice Grind coffeeshop told CBS2 their business is down 25 percent since the road diet went into effect.

    Atkinson also says that, rather than make the street safer for bikers, the bottlenecks have made them more dangerous.

    “I saw two people get hit on bicycles in a month, and in five years, I never saw anybody get hit on a bicycle,” Atkinson told CBS2.

    Atkinson’s grandfather ran Louie’s Meat Market with a fellow World War II veteran at the location from 1954 to 1969.

    He says the road diet is a flawed design that ruined a dream.

    “Politicians murdered me,” laments Atkinson. “They killed my business.”

    TechShop Abruptly Shuts Down All Locations, Including San Jose HQ

    TechShop Abruptly Shuts Down All Locations, Including San Jose HQ


    SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — Another company has just closed down on what has become a troubled block in San Jose. TechShop is going out of business, closing its headquarters on South Second Street as well as its 10 locations. “In spite of many months of...

    SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — Another company has just closed down on what has become a troubled block in San Jose.

    TechShop is going out of business, closing its headquarters on South Second Street as well as its 10 locations.

    “In spite of many months of effort to restructure the company’s debt and raise new capital to fund our recently announced strategic pivot, we have depleted our funds,” TechShop states on its website.

    TechShop, which rents workshop space and tools for entrepreneurs, abruptly locked its doors on Tuesday and went bankrupt just months after making South Second Street its headquarters.

    It occupied the same space as a failed Zanotto’s Market, which closed its doors at the location several years ago, even though the chain thrives in other parts of the city.

    Ironically, both businesses received economic incentives from San Jose.

    But walk up and down on either side, and it’s one empty storefront after another. It’s a hard luck street in the heart of the city.

    Two nightclubs on the block recently closed as well.

    What is it about South Second Street between Santa Clara and San Fernando that causes businesses to die?

    Tattoo artist Abraham Ortega opened the Blacksuit Tattoo parlor last year.

    “It’s very desolate here. It’s empty,” Ortega said. “I don’t know what’s going on, why there are no businesses here. There haven’t been businesses here for years.”

    Blacksuit Tattoo is the only business to open recently and shares the only bright spot on the block with a Mini Market.

    “First Street’s good. Third Street’s good. North Second Street is okay. But South Second Street?  It’s just not there,” Ortega said.

    A comedy club in the old Jose Theatre still draws crowds, but mostly on weekend nights.

    The street has daytime foot traffic, light rail and bus stops and a parking lot.

    But it also has a bad reputation.

    Fountain Alley, a connecting pedestrian walkway, was once a notorious hangout for drug dealers.

    The police department has cleaned up the area, but problems remain.

    “The rent is kind of high,” said Alfredo Diaz who, with his wife Maria, runs Diaz Mens Wear. Their shop has survived since the 1980s.

    Diaz says city hall should target the area for economic development or else the street will continue to be a revolving door.

    “We’ve seen businesses coming and leaving, coming and leaving. It happens a lot,” Diaz said. “They come and go.”